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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Plenty of giant hooks, plenty of awesome songs
From the explosive opener, "Regular John," to the subtle and soulful closing song, "I Was a Teenage Hand Model," this is one splendid debut album by QOTSA. From the gimmicky Mexican-tinged thematics, to the abstract song titles that have seemingly little to do with the lyrics, to the crushing and tuneful guitars and awesome drum work, this is one of the best rock and roll...
Published on May 27, 2003 by Sal Nudo

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Self titled self explanatory...
Remember acid rock? Turning up the volume (on the stereo and the drug) till the bleeding - distorted guitar riffs, deep bass slides, and drum sets that are just a high hat and snare would make your eyes sink into your now disformed skull. Yes , its alive with Q.O.T.S.A. first full album. Like most Freshman attempts kinks do need to be worked out though. The songs can...
Published on July 31, 2005 by Nari YoYo-Beat Jones


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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Plenty of giant hooks, plenty of awesome songs, May 27, 2003
By 
Sal Nudo (Champaign, Illinois) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
From the explosive opener, "Regular John," to the subtle and soulful closing song, "I Was a Teenage Hand Model," this is one splendid debut album by QOTSA. From the gimmicky Mexican-tinged thematics, to the abstract song titles that have seemingly little to do with the lyrics, to the crushing and tuneful guitars and awesome drum work, this is one of the best rock and roll CDs in my collection. It's like Led Zeppelin meeting the Pixies who meet up with the Stone Temple Pilots. There's lots of muscially pleasing stuff here, riff after riff, gigantic chord after gigantic chord, as the songs breezily sail forward before you even know what hit you, without one plain or unworthy musical moment occuring.

Mastermind Josh Homme, he of the pleasing, purely melodious song structures emanating from his head to his guitar on a 24-hour basis, plays stellar guitars while changing his falsetto voice and mood from mournful to pleading to bored as the album moves along. It's not all Homme, though. Part of this album's charm is its pervading darkness, underneath all the big guitars, crass, indifferent attitude and bravado. Much of this ingratiating darkness comes from the heavy bass sound heard throughout. Mixed with Homme's crush-heavy ax guitar is somber, Soundgarden-like tuning down, which makes for great music. These guys are much more akin to Nirvana than bands like the Foo Fighters, Blink-182 or most radio bands today who are slaves to their record companies. In my mind, QOTSA were undoubtedly so sure of themselves back in 1998 for one reason: Their music was unstoppable. It's notable that QOTSA's original drummer was great on the skins; his drums on this album really enhance the overall sound.

One song of special mention is the somber "You Can't Quit Me Baby." Playing the role of a lost, depressed soul, Homme sounds mournful and weary as a heavy bass and hard-popping drums surround his isolated voice like down-and-out bliss. The song is a bit of a respite on this heavy rock record, and it fully makes its point, even stands out quite prominently as the music begins to wind down.

No, this debut record is not as complex or musically diverse as QOTSA's later album, Songs for the Deaf, nor is it as sonically easy on the ears perhaps as Queens of the Stone Age - Rated R, but therein lies its beauty. This is Led Zeppelin for a later age -- Zeppelin with a sense of humor, irony and better tunes.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thickish groovly sub-stoner rock fatalist crunchtasy., May 19, 2003
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This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
Finding out about Queens of the Stone Age is like opening that trunk in the basement. The funky one you never really noticed, the one that's been there longer than you can remember, the one that's full of priceless stuff you've always wanted and should've found ages ago.
QOTSA revealed themselves to me on the Heavy Metal 2000 soundtrack which I bought for a one-off Pantera tune, and in the classic form of bad movies having exceptional music attached to them I found the QOTSA sound, playing "Infinity" to the best of their form. About a month later, they were booked for the Winter X Games at Mammoth Mountain. After 3/4 of the floor cleared because their limp aural ethic couldn't handle the QOTSA vibe, it was up to me and twenty devoted friends, by ourselves, to be hit full and complete with a great show that reached well back into QOTSA history. After the show, one of my pals suggested I look into Josh Homme's roots and listen to Kyuss if I like this stuff so much. After you buy this album, go try Kyuss' Blues for the Red Sun and it just gets better. This sound has its own gravity.
The band creates high quality, juicy, sludgy, fat and chewy neo-Sabbath stoner/desert rock without sounding like they're trying very hard at all. Their ability to stick to a groove and play it out is uncanny. "You Would Know" - a weird, jerky phone call-stalker anthem that grows into a exceptionally heavy mini-raga. "Avon" - made for radio but too damn good for people to appreciate. "You Can't Quit Me Baby" - suicide on a stick, a melody rich plea for recognition. None of it's the same - listen and grow into it. All of this sound smacks of garage band production ethics done for the big screen, and the QOTSA sound is uncorruptable. If you like your desert metal big and thick, intelligent and complete but utterly rock & roll with a meaty slab of funky Black Sabbath or Deep Purple-style metal flair, try this on.
jf
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Album, October 30, 2004
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
I first bought Songs for the Deaf and was pretty blown away. Being a classic rocker, I usually cringe at the sound of modern music these days. The QOTSA sound was unlike any other ive ever heard before and I instanly fell in love with it. The way the album sounded like a radio was also very cool. Anyways, I just recently decided I'd pick up the other two albums of the collection. Rated R was so-so. However, this album, their self-titled debut is outrageous! It's about 3 times better than songs for the deaf, if that is possible. I like every song on this album. I recommend it to anyone that is looking for something different than the nu-metal sound that so many bands posess today. Considering I usually listen to the Floyd, Zeppelin, Beatles, and The Who, you should take it from me that this is an amazing modern band and an amazing album.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must-have Reissue, May 27, 2011
By 
Luke (Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age - (Censored) (Audio CD)
Finally the long awaited reissue of Queens of the Stone Age's self-titled debut arrives, much to the delight and anticipation of fans yet to snag a high priced original copy of the out of print classic. For the fans yet to acquire a copy of the original pressing this reissue is a no-brainer, BUY, BUY, BUY! So perhaps the more relevant question should be: Is this a good value reissue worth re-buying for the fans that snared an original copy in years past?

After such a long wait and several lengthy delays I can report that this reissue has been carefully put together with some nice new features and a healthy respect to the great, almost cult status of the original pressing. Firstly the tracks themselves have been updated with a remastering job. Now there is good argument that the original album sounds as crisp, fuzzy and vibrant as ever and a remaster is entirely unnecessary. Those who dispute the idea of a remastering have a good point; however, after piecing together a reissue of an album over ten years old why not give it a nice tune-up? Admittedly the results are quite subtle and it took listening to the older pressing and this new update side-by-side to distinctly discern between them. Josh Homme's vocals are a little clearer and more up front while the guitars and general mix offer enhanced clarity and volume.

Perhaps the greatest asset of this reissue is not only the inclusion of three hard-to-find B-sides previously available on their early splits with Kyuss and Beaver, but the fact that Homme sequenced them carefully into his once intended order in the original release. This is refreshing after so many reissues slap the bonus tracks at times haphazardly at the end of the album proper, or on an extra disc. Artwork and layout has been slightly altered and updated without losing the cheap charm of the original booklet. The inclusion of all the lyrics is a welcome addition.

Two of the bonus tracks are instrumental (`These Aren't The Droids You're Looking For', `Spiders and Vinegaroons') though both are more interesting than original instrumental track `Hispanic Impressions', especially the latter `Spiders and Vinegaroons' with its hypnotic slow building rhythm and industrial tinged breakdown/climax. `The Bronze' remains one of Queens' early classics and is a must hear song for the uninitiated and a welcome inclusion. This beefs up the playing time of the album without overstaying its welcome.

The original tracks on the debut remain as vital as ever, retaining the smooth grooves, eclectic edges and the hard rocking, fuzzed out vibe and tight jams that made this album such a pleasure to begin with. Alfredo Hernandez (ex-Kyuss) is superb on drums, delivering an energetic, varied performance while Homme's song-writing chops, assured, melodic vocals and guitar work are obvious standouts. Queens Of The Stone Age is a must-have rock album that stands tall when stacked up against their distinguished catalogue, and for that matter, any rock album from the modern era. Recommended to fans old and new.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Post-Grunge Overdrive, March 1, 2000
By 
Joe (Hellmont, MA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
QOTSA share much in common with my old 5.0 Mustang. It didn't have any options, sounded like a beast at idle and ran like a mother when you opened it up. It couldn't handle corners at all, but that never mattered to me. It was a machine with attitude. Just like these guys. QOTSA take a pure distillation of 70's rock sensibility and drop it into the chassis of 90's grunge to create something better than both. Simple, catchy rhythms, heavy riffs and lots of drums make this power trio an A list selection for any hard rock fan. If you want complexity in a power trio, buy some Rush, but if you just wanna rock, buy QOTSA.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wailing Vocal Sets the Ever So Cool Scene, June 19, 2000
By 
Jeff Whiteside (Palm Desert, California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
Josh Homme is, like another reviewer said, a genius. His project, Queens of the Stone Age are a relentless force, chugging out desert-like riffs and steady drumming. His wailing vocal is very cool, and is one of the best since John Garcia first came on to the scene. I like to call this porno-stoner-rock, because of the more used topic of women in their music, much opposed to the usual, dune buggy-van-desert-sunset music. Still, this does not stray far from the usual stoner rock, with their sun baked riffs. This CD is fast paced and packed chock full of bluesy melodies like "Regular John", "You Would Know", "I Was a Teenage Hand Model", and "Avon". They are very talented guitar players, too, and their riffs aren't hard, but they certainly are harder to play than bands like sHEAVY, who sound like they have never played before. This is a great item, great band, and great individual musicians as well. Check this out if you're into Hendrix or Clutch.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Melody over Metal, December 27, 2002
By 
"drumb" (milwaukee, wi United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
On Kyuss' final album, "...And the Circus Leaves Town," the band had shown a markedly different approach to their trademark desert rock style. The extended psychedelic fuzz was replaced with mellow wah-wah grooves and the songs themselves were shortened to a much more pop oriented length. With Kyuss now deceased, it should come as no surprise that these final genre evolutions on "...Circus..." were really laying the groundwork for Josh Homme's new project "Queens of the Stone Age." Now, continuing in the same vein as Kyuss' final days, QOTSA's self-titled debut is still plenty heavy, but their explorations of new and original sounds are what really make this album such an overall refreshing and inviting affair. Homme's soft waves of gentle feedback and muscular falsetto singing style replace the emotive destruction of Kyuss, finally giving the guitarist room to explore his quieter, emotional side that was always so rarely touched upon. Even the heavier numbers, "Walkin' on the Sidewalks" and "Mexicola", have a newly found warmth and personality to them that make the entire record much more enchanting. Obviously, this preference for a lighter sound brings melody to the forefront, but through Homme's ability to encapsulate so much beneath this melodic front, from Lo-fi on "I Was a Teenage Hand Model" to full-on metal on "Regular John," he proves himself to be a truly diverse and multifaceted individual who has more than enough ideas of his own to carry a band. Although Kyuss was always much more textured and intricate than their critics gave them credit for, Homme really opens up the band's shell shedding some of the unnecessary testosterone to let the overshadowed emotional core shine through. While the dissolution of Kyuss is nothing short of disappointing, Homme's revitalized Queens of the Stone Age have and hopefully will continue to capture all the glory and power of their late iconic predecessors.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Most Underrated Albums Ever?, June 10, 2005
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
I've been a huge fan of Kyuss for years and I got into QOTSA since it featured Josh Homme and Nick Oliveri. I was always a fan of Josh's guitarwork and catchy, rhythmic, hook-driven rock. I loved R, Songs for the Deaf and Lullabies to Paralyze and after seeing them in concert recently during which they played several songs from this album I had to check it out. I purchased it and fell in love instantly. On Kyuss' final album '...And the Circus Leaves Town' you definatly hear the music growing from the heavy, sludged out Sabbath rock into something more polished and constructed. I found this record to be a perfectly blended middle point, its very Kyuss yet very Queens. This album is refined sludge, its catchy, rhythmic, atmospheric and fierce all at the same time. All of the songs are good, my personal favorites are If Only, Mexicola, you Can't Quit Me Baby, Give the Mule What he Wants and Regular John. If you want a great rock album that you can play over and over for days on end pick this up. And if you ever get a chance check them out in concert, it'll be one of the best rock shows you'll ever see.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Muy Bueno QOTSA!, September 3, 2002
By 
Paul Mcdonough (Irving, Texas United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
This album, the debut from Queens of the Stone Age is everything that you could hope for from a heavy music album, in fact, it may well be the perfect hard rock/heavy metal album. From the opening "Regular John" to the awesome "lead" drums of "avon" to the bass intro to "mexicola" this album is damn near perfect! I was skeptical following the demise of Kyuss, but Josh Homme (not quite John Garcia) is a great rhythm/lead guitarist whose ephemeral vocals compliment these songs perfectly. However, it is the rhythm section that really stands out on this disc (You don't get much more "locked in" than Olivieri and Hernandez do). In addition (and as hard as it may seem), these guys are even better live, a testament to their musical commitment. Buy this CD (and pick up all the Kyuss stuff while you are at it) if you even pretend to like heavy music
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Under 17 Admitted, May 9, 2005
By 
This review is from: Queens of the Stone Age (Audio CD)
While less adventurous, this album is much in the same vein as "Songs for the Deaf" and "Lullabies to Paralyze". If you've been introduced to QoTSA recently and want to check out some of their older stuff, this is what you want. Their 2nd album "Rated R" is far too experimental in my opinion and (while it did win them acclaim among critics) it doesn't really sound like it fits in QoTSA's library. Even though the first album may not be flashy like later releases, it's just good grinding rock.
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Queens of the Stone Age - (Censored)
Queens of the Stone Age - (Censored) by Queens Of The Stone Age (Audio CD - 2011)
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