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Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics, and Literature (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies)

4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0816529070
ISBN-10: 0816529078
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Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics, and Literature (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies) + Two-Spirit People: Native American Gender Identity, Sexuality, and Spirituality + Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies)
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Queer Indigenous Studies is an important contribution to queer social theory, Native studies, and the ethnography of American misunderstanding and the culture of comparison." –Center for Great Plains Studies


"Drawing upon diverse fields ranging from anthropology, gender, sociology, feminism, ethnic and indigenous cultures, this book is a groundbreaking attempt to analyze politicized points intersecting the controversial discourses of queer and indigenous studies." –AlterNative


“Raises the bar for critical discussions of race, gender, sexuality, and beyond.”—JAC: A Journal of Rhetoric, Culture, & Politics

From the Inside Flap

This edited collection examines the understanding of gay, lesbian, transgender, queer and Two-Spirit communities within indigenous society. Based on the reality that queer Indigenous people "experience multilayered oppression that profoundly impacts our safety, health, and survival," this book is at once an imagining and an invitation to the reader to join in the discussion of decolonizing queer Indigenous research and theory and, by doing so, to partake in collective resistance working toward positive change.

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Product Details

  • Series: First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies
  • Paperback: 258 pages
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press (March 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816529078
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816529070
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #101,828 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Garrett Nichols on June 13, 2012
Format: Paperback
Driskill, Finley, Gilley, and Morgensen have compiled an astounding and ground-breaking collection that challenges all of us to recognize and interrogate the intersections of sexuality, sovereignty, and settler colonialism. More importantly, though, the editors and authors graciously and generously invite all scholars, Native and non-Native alike, to respond to and understand their own role in these systems of oppression and the struggle to decolonize our lands, bodies, literature, and relationships.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is great, it includes viewpoints typically excluded from other studies involving indigenous peoples.

And, contrary to what was posted in another review, I think it is accessible. It would certainly help to have some familiarity with the works that are cited in this book- but compared to a lot of things out there, it's a fairly straightforward read.
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By apmxtd on January 28, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
okay
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6 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jeffery Mingo on June 14, 2011
Format: Paperback
When I lived in Guam, Chamorro activists placed a big sign on a major road that read something like, "Have the American Indians or Alaskan Natives been helped by these measures?!" When I studied Federal Indian Law, Felix Cohen's text ends with casework from Canada and New Zealand. There's a good book called "The Nations Within" that discusses Native Americans, Canadian First Nations, and New Zealand Maoris. This anthology differs from other Two Spirits book as it includes other indigenous people, namely from Canada and New Zealand.

But be warned that this is noooooo easy read. Unless you can understand complex writers like Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, or Homi Bhabha, you may be scared away here. This is a book for academics' academics. For example, Dr. B.J. Gilley's book on Two Spirit men is much more user-friendly than his chapter in this text. (It's interesting to see too that he came out as a heterosexual Native in this chapter, rather than just coming out as hetero.) Sometimes the chapters here seem overly critical too.

I can't say it enough: this is hardcore! It is for graduate students, not everyday folk.
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