Quiz Show 1994 PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

(107) IMDb 7.5/10
Available in HD

A big-money, high-stakes TV game show becomes the subject of scandal when a Washington investigator uncovers corruption behind-the-scenes - implicating both the current and former champs.

Starring:
John Turturro, Rob Morrow
Runtime:
2 hours 13 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Quiz Show

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Robert Redford
Starring John Turturro, Rob Morrow
Supporting actors Ralph Fiennes, Paul Scofield, David Paymer, Hank Azaria, Christopher McDonald, Johann Carlo, Elizabeth Wilson, Allan Rich, Mira Sorvino, George Martin, Paul Guilfoyle, Griffin Dunne, Michael Mantell, Byron Jennings, Ben Shenkman, Timothy Busfield, Jack Gilpin, Bruce Altman
Studio Hollywood Pictures
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

A second reason this film succeeds so well is its tremendous period feel.
Robert Moore
Usually, when I see a film about the fifties, it looks like someone's imagination of what those times were like.
Linda Linguvic
His confession to a Congressional panel of being fed the answers to show questions disrupted his life.
Annie Van Auken

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 1, 2002
Format: DVD
Although not a reason this movie is so good, I would like to begin by stating that as a graduate of Ouachita Baptist University of Arkadelphia, Arkansas, I believe this is the only movie ever made that mentions Arkadelphia. And not just once, but twice!
There are many, many reasons this movie succeeds so marvelously, but I would like to focus on three.
First, this movie benefits from an exceedingly fine cast. Not merely the leads, but many of the lesser roles are filled with extremely good actors and actresses. While Ralph Fiennes, John Tuturro, and Rob Morrow all shine in the leads, lesser parts are filled with people like David Paymer, Hank Azaria, Mira Sorvino, and Martin Scorsese. I was especially impressed by the always superb but underutilized Paul Scofield (who won the Oscar portraying Thomas More in A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS). He seems the very embodiment of the man of reason, erudition, and courtesy portraying Mark van Doren, and his pain upon learning his beloved son has lost his teaching position at Columbia is one of the great poignant moments in the film. Look very carefully at the scene where several attractive coeds interrupt Ralph Fiennes and Rob Morrow and you will spot Calista Flockhart (a.k.a. Ally McBeal).
A second reason this film succeeds so well is its tremendous period feel. The movie looks and feels like the late 1950s at every second. QUIZ SHOW does a great job of [pulling] you in and giving you an almost tangible sense of time and place.
Finally, the movie is easily one of the most accurate historical films I have ever seen, although drama is never sacrificed for the mere sake of being accurate. If one has done any reading about the scandals or perhaps if one remembers the events, the film constantly impresses with the amount of accurate detail it contains.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Linda Linguvic HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 31, 2004
Format: DVD
Directed by Robert Redford and nominated for several Academy Awards, this 1994 film tells the true story of the quiz show "21" in the 1950s and how the contestants were given the answers ahead of time and coached for the show. As a child at the time I remember the hoopla and how whole families would watch this show together, holding their collective breaths during the competitions for big money. It was a time of innocence and the viewing community was deceived. And never again have the networks won that kind of public trust.

Paul Attansio adapted the screenplay from the book written by Richard N. Goodwin who was the government investigator at the time. In the film this role is played by Rob Morrow who is determined to uncover the deception. All the other actors are excellent too - most notably John Turturro who is cast as a Jewish man from Queens who is allowed to win for seven weeks before being replaced by Charles Van Doran, a professor at Columbia who came from a long line of scholars. Paul Scofield also shines in the role of Van Doran's father, who stands by his son even though the family is disgraced by the publicity.

It's not just the quiz show phenomenon that comes alive in this film. It is the nature of the times as well as the anti-Semitic undercurrent and cultural conflict that was endemic. Usually, when I see a film about the fifties, it looks like someone's imagination of what those times were like. But this film was different. I really felt I was right back there, many years before computers or even color television, sitting wide-eyed in front of that black and white set and admiring the contestants for being so smart. Times have changed. Now, we know we're being manipulated. And there is no outrage.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Kovatch on August 18, 2000
Format: DVD
When I first heard about this movie, I thought, "A guy cheats on a quiz show. What a dumb idea." Then when it was up for the 1994 Oscar for Best Picture, I said to myself, "Well, I saw the other four movies up for BP this year." So I rented it. Then I bought it. Then it was playing in my VCR almost every day as background sound when I played on the computer or ate. I have the dialogue pretty much memorized now. The movie is art. It was an instant classic. A must see. Every time I watch it I notice something new or "get" a joke I never understood before. It has fantastic actors, unbelievable dialogue, and is a cute little story. This reigns as my favorite movie of all time.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Ariel Escasa on July 4, 2003
Format: DVD
How many times have you seen this disclaimer at the end credits: "The story depicted in this motion picture is based on actual events. However, certain characters and incidents were added for dramatic effect."
What the filmmakers are telling us here, folks, is that without these added elements, the movie would be downright boring. See, if we tell it like it is, we won't make money.
Director Robert Redford and screenplay writer Paul Attanasio would have none of that. They chose to chronicle the events leading up to the quiz show scandal of the late 1950s without the embellishments that have become so much a part of Hollywood tradition. For that alone, they deserve the highest praises. But what makes Quiz Show a cinematic marvel is its ability to keep the viewer involved while remaining unerringly faithful to the facts.
John Turturro and Ralph Fiennes turn in career performances as contestants who at first benefit from, but later become victims of a system that dictates that ratings are more important than moral integrity. Turturro plays Herb Stempel, the annoying Jew who at first makes for an appealing underdog but soon wears out his welcome, and so has to take a "dive." Fiennes is Charles Van Doren, the handsome, clean-cut Ivy Leaguer who is seen as the worthy replacement and goes along with the deception, only to soon find himself in over his head but unable to just walk away.
Equally impressive is the supporting cast: Rob Morrow as Congressional investigator Richard Goodwin, Hank Azaria and David Paymer as the quiz show's manipulative producers, and Paul Scofield as Van Doren's ever-supportive but unaware father. Also exceptional, but easy to overlook in the glow of the all-star cast, are Johann Carlo as the unsophisticated, non-intellectual but nonetheless faithful Mrs.
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