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Quomodo Invidiosulus Nomine Grinchus Christi Natalem Abrogaverit: How the Grinch Stole Christmas in Latin (Latin Edition) Paperback


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Quomodo Invidiosulus Nomine Grinchus Christi Natalem Abrogaverit: How the Grinch Stole Christmas in Latin (Latin Edition) + Winnie Ille Pu (Latin Edition) + Cattus Petasatus: The Cat in the Hat in Latin (Latin Edition)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 and up
  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers (October 1, 1998)
  • Language: Latin
  • ISBN-10: 0865164207
  • ISBN-13: 978-0865164208
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.1 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #736,718 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

...the most unusal new book this holiday seasons -- a Latin version of the version of the Dr. Seuss classic, How the Grinch Stole Christmas! Yep. Latin. Frontus to backus. -- Scott Smith, The Gazette (Colorado Springs), Nov. 1998

...the most unusal new book this holiday seasons -- a Latin version of the version of the Dr. Seuss classic, How the Grinch Stole Christmas! Yep. Latin. Frontus to backus. -- Scott Smith, The Gazette (Colorado Springs), Nov. 1998

Anyone who claims Latin is dead should take a look at this book. The translation of Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine Grinchus Christi natalem Abrogaverit reminds us of just how alive Latin can be. -- Kenneth Kitchell, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Certainly the child in every Latinist will be delighted to read this old favorite of Dr. Seuss. -- Ginny Lindzey, Texas Classical Association

Hic liber usui erit non solum professoribus linguae Latinae send quoque discipulis in scholis et universitatibus qui loqui Latin vellent . . . Et quoque Grinchus Latine est bona fabula. -- Alvin P. Dobsevage

It's something sill, I thought, and in LATIN, no less
Write a review? What to do? I was confused, I confess.
But, once I cracked it to take a good look,
I saw there was quite a lot to this book.
The Latin is easy and spunky and quick
and I laughed when the Grinch tried to look like St. Nick.
There are plenty of figures of speech in this writing
alliteration, assonance and onomatopoeia are there for the citing.
And for those who like a word list near re ought to be MORE!
They reminds us that Latin does not just survive
It's ALIVE
and it needs us to help it to thrive.
So three cheers for the Tunbergs, Dr. Seuss, and Bolchazy!
For without them, I think, we could all become lazy. -- Margaret Brucia

Jennifer and Terence Tunberg have succeeded in rendering a modern myth in lively, impeccable Latin, accompanied by the charming illustrations of the original Dr. Seuss story. -- John Traupman, author of Conversational Latin

Splendid translation . . . It is Latin indeed! -- Jozef Ijsewijn, Katholicke Universiteit Leuven

The Grinch Who Stole Christmas by Theodor Geisel (Dr. Suess) has been a storybook staple for over 40 years. To the many languages around the world in which it has been successfully published we must now add one more -- Neo-Latin! All thanks to scholar-translators Jennifer and Terence Tunberg who have done a delightful version courtesy of Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, the leading publisher of Latin and Greek classroom language materials in this country. -- James A. Cox, Editor-in-Chief, The Midwest Book Review

The Tunbergs make Ted Geisel sound like Virgil! -- The Washington Po

Volo quod dicam, Dixi quo vellem; Spiritum Verum Doctoris Appellem! (I mean what I say and I've said what I meant: the spirit of Seuss one-hundred percent!) --Judith Hallett, University of Maryland

Anyone who claims Latin is dead should take a look at this book. The translation of Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine Grinchus Christi natalem Abrogaverit reminds us of just how alive Latin can be. -- Kenneth Kitchell, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Certainly the child in every Latinist will be delighted to read this old favorite of Dr. Seuss. -- Ginny Lindzey, Texas Classical Association

Hic liber usui erit non solum professoribus linguae Latinae send quoque discipulis in scholis et universitatibus qui loqui Latin vellent . . . Et quoque Grinchus Latine est bona fabula. -- Alvin P. Dobsevage

It's something sill, I thought, and in LATIN, no less
Write a review? What to do? I was confused, I confess.
B --Judith Hallett, University of Maryland

Language Notes

Text: Latin (translation)
Original Language: English --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

"A person's a person, no matter how small," Theodor Seuss Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, would say. "Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted."

Brilliant, playful, and always respectful of children, Dr. Seuss charmed his way into the consciousness of four generations of youngsters and parents. In the process, he helped millions of kids learn to read.

Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904. After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1925, he went to Oxford University, intending to acquire a doctorate in literature. At Oxford, Geisel met Helen Palmer, whom he wed in 1927. Upon his return to America later that year, Geisel published cartoons and humorous articles for Judge, the leading humor magazine in America at that time. His cartoons also appeared in major magazines such as Life, Vanity Fair, and Liberty. Geisel gained national exposure when he won an advertising contract for an insecticide called Flit. He coined the phrase, "Quick, Henry, the Flit!" which became a popular expression.

Geisel published his first children's book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937, after 27 publishers rejected it.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1984, an Academy Award, three Emmy Awards, three Grammy Awards, and three Caldecott Honors, Geisel wrote and illustrated 44 books. While Theodor Geisel died on September 24, 1991, Dr. Seuss lives on, inspiring generations of children of all ages to explore the joys of reading.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#53 Overall (See top 100 authors)
#53 in Books
#53 in Books

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
"The Grinch Who Stole Christmas," in Latin is one of the greatest Latin books I have read. I am a student of Latin and it is hard to find interesting books to read and translate. The translation is not hard and with the glossary, it makes reading very easy.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By David Stabler on June 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
Imagine my surprise when this showed up one day from a friend of mine. He gave it to my wife and me because she was a religion major and I'm a theology student working through my latin. There is nothing quite as fun as trying to make sense of something you already know, and the Grinch is a story I've known for years! The flow and cadence are even preserved, making the translators into linguistic artists beyond compare! Just be sure to pick up Winnie Ille Pu as well, and read to your kids in a language that is, to quote Python, "not dead yet!"
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 13, 1999
Format: Hardcover
When I first saw the book I knew it was what I was looking for. The idea of putting children's books into Latin is great because books in Latin are very few and far in between. I liked the book because it is colorful and easy to translate. Also the book makes a great gift for Latin students and teachers because it makes Latin a fun and interesting langauge.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Sine Nomine on January 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
multum gaudium ex hoc libro excepi; multas gratias Guineverae et Terentio Tunberg ago. oportet omnes lingua Latina fruentes hunc librum emere. lingua Latina iam vivit!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "wumouse" on July 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
Having been read by children of all ages and even made into a movie, the story of the Grinch is a familiar and beloved tale. The timeless triumph of love and goodwill retains all of its charm in Latin, especially because the authors retain rhyme and meter, even throwing in new wordplay.
The pictures from the original Dr. Seuss book help the reader follow the storyline, and the glossary in the back has every word in the book. Especially in modern context, the Grinch in Latin appeals to us by giving hope when even a grinch can be won over by sincere faith. Thus, while this book is wonderful as a gift to those studying Latin or looking to study Latin, it is also perfectly suitable for those who simply want a good story.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
The glossary included in this book is awesome. You will not find a word in the story that is not included. The classic favorite has all of the illustrations we remember from childhood - while the Latin text allows you to practice, and keep building your vocabulary and reading skills. What a wonderful way to bring Latin to your children!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The children enjoy their weekly Latin class, but THIS book excites them to learn everything they can in order to read The Grinch in Latin.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Id est quod est. My Latin is not good enough to evaluate the translation's quality, but this now has a spot on my shelf along with "Hobbitus Ille" and "Winnie Ille Pu."

The biggest failure of this small book is not the translator's fault. Seuss' poetry is remarkable for its extremely regular rhythm and rhyme, two qualities that Latin poetry in general tends to downplay. To impose English poetic conventions on the language of Cicero would make it something ... well, something else.

Fun! For Latin students, and people with strange senses of humor like myself.
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