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4.5 out of 5 stars
RCA ANT751 Durable Compact Outdoor Antenna
Price:$41.99 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
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470 of 503 people found the following review helpful
on June 29, 2010
Verified Purchase
My wife and I were with Comcast for 10 years and they recently decided to make some major changes (triple the cost or only 20-30 channels almost ALL of which are local or shopping). Minor changes did take place during the time we were with them such as Price and Services (I would go into details but I would rather not bore you). We had always decided that Comcast was pretty much the only other option then Direct TV and such.

Amazingly we noticed (because Comcast wanted to make these recent major changes) that we didn't really watch that much TV, and when we did, it was the Local Stations that we were mostly watching. We then decided to cut Comcast completely out of the picture (no pun intended), and we started to shop for an antenna. Needless to say, we found this one. Reading the reviews on both Amazon and one other web-site (apparently I can't say which web-site that is, because "Amazon's" people will end up deleting it from this review "[...]") I was very excited to test this out, especially where Wal-Mart was selling this exact one for $30 more than what Amazon was selling it for at the time I purchased it.

The installation of this antenna was simple. It is very light and perfect to work with, just make sure that you have coax cable to go with it. The HD Quality is unbelievable. There are some stations that we receive in HD that we are now getting better reception with then what Comcast was providing at the time we had them. With this antenna, we get between 24 to 30 English stations and roughly 10 to 15 Spanish stations (I would only assume it is different in each State/County).

I viewed some of the reviews on Wal-Mart's web-site on this antenna and noticed that one reviewer had pictures where he placed this antenna in their attic. I recently finished our basement and did not want to drill more holes. I have my main connection to our Cable/TV runing next to my breaker box in our Cold Room (food Storage), and I placed the Antenna in their, a simple connection. I installed the antenna on the Ceiling of the room. I live in Utah County and we have Mountains that can easily block the signal. The closest tower for reception where I live is about 40 miles, it is also beyond the corner of one of the Mountains. Even with that and being in our basement the picture is great!

This Antenna is a must have!!! Very Simple to put together, very light and you really can stick it anywhere. I figured by putting it indoors, it will not get weather damage and should last us a very long time. Hurray for FREE TV! Also note that I do not have an Amplifier with this as other reviews do have and still getting great reception. It does make me curious though if I would get more channels or even better reception on those channels that don't have a 100% reception on.
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288 of 307 people found the following review helpful
on July 18, 2012
Verified Purchase
There's no magic antenna that works for everyone. It all depends on your distance to the broadcast station, whether your channels are UHF or VHF, and existance of inteference/obstructions. To find out if it works for you, go to antennapoint.com and see

1. How far you are from the broadcast station - If you're less than 40 miles without anything in between (hills/trees/buildings) then it will work. I'm 37 mile from the main one, so I get all channels. If more than 40 miles then try a bigger outdoor antenna, like the Winegard.

2. Whether the channels are UHF only or both UHF and VHF - If UHF only then you're in luck, because you might be able to find a smaller indoor antenna that will work fine. If both UHF/VHF then you'll need an antenna like this RCA NT751R.

Quality - Its aluminum construction is lightweight and won't corrode. A sturdy mount is included (unlike other antennas). It can flip 90 degrees, allowing mounting on both horizontal and vertical surfaces.

More things to buy - You'll need to buy bolts/screws to fasten the mount into your roof/wall. You'll also need to buy your own coaxial cable. I also bought a 4ft pole to extend the height of the antenna past the crest of my roof. The round pole drops into the mount easily and the antenna has a U brace that clamps onto the pole.

Installation - The hard part will be installation and wiring. Point the smaller end toward the broadcast station for best reception. National Electrical Code also requires grounding it in case of lightning strike. If possible, you should try attic installation first, to hide the antenna from view and to forgo the grounding requirement. In my case, I lost a couple of important channels (out of around 55), so I decided to mount it on the roof. You can buy a coaxial cable that has a ground wire attached to it. If you drill any hole into the house, you'll have to cover up the hole with silicone sealant to avoid molding problem inside the wall. Antenna cables are considered "low voltage", so you are not required by code to cover it up with metal or PVC tubes like electrical wires.
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263 of 287 people found the following review helpful
Verified Purchase
UPDATE DEC 2014: I wrote this back in Sep 2011, and three years and a couple of months later, this antenna is still up in the attic doing its job. My neighbors tree has gotten "leafier" in the last few years, so I have some issues with a few rogue channels, but all the important ones I have no problems with. Great purchase.

Original Review: I had to cut cable TV earlier this year due to money issues, and from about May till September I was operating with good old rabbit ears in the house. When they worked, it worked great. But I was getting fed up of the constant moving of the rabbit ears, or the twiddling of the dial to get this channel or the other. There was some sort of interference inside my house preventing them from working well enough. Once in a blue moon, I'd get lucky, find a sweet spot and get everything, but it didn't last long. I was unwilling to go on the roof for an antenna, so I was thinking about the attic.

I've been around TV for a long time, and my "head" tells me that to get better reception, you need to get a bigger antenna. I figured with a large tree in my neighbor's house, as well as it being an attic, I was looking at something large up there. Specifically this (Antennas Direct DB8 Multidirectional HDTV Antenna). I was looking at getting the DB8, when a friend of mine who was going to help me by mounting it in the attic suggested I might get by with something smaller. He recommended the antenna I'm writing about now. I was initially skeptical (again, the bigger is better attitude). But I read through a ton of reviews, and there were a lot of happy people. At the time I bought it, there were 220 reviews on Amazon with an average star rating of 4.5 out of 5. That's actually a higher review than the DB8 I was looking at. So I started reading, and was thinking perhaps I'd go with this.

Then while we were thinking about how to run cable, I remembered when my wife and I got the house 9.5 years ago (as of Sep 2011, when I'm writing) it was wired for Cable TV. I dropped the Cable TV, but the wires were all still there. Which meant that there was a cable run there already. So I decided to run a test. I took the same stupid $6 rabbit ears I was at the time using (RCA ANT111R Basic Indoor Antenna), and took 'em into the attic. I found the cable that went to the jack by my TV, and plugged the rabbit ears into it. Rescanned, and wow. Not only was my interference gone, it was picking up a lot more channels than I knew about. The most I got with the rabbit ears inside the house was about 35-40. It was more here. So I figured with the rabbit ears doing that much better, perhaps I didn't need the overkill DB8, and opted for this antenna, the ANT751R.

Did my research beforehand. Hit up antennaweb as well as tvfool for compass directions. Personally I think tvfool has way better antenna resources than antennaweb, but that's a side story. I got it installed in the attic (you can see a picture of my installation in the photo gallery here on Amazon). The mounting was fairly painless, although I will say what others have said. It's quite a value that the antenna comes with the mounting brackets and the pole in the box. Not all antennas do. The one thing that was missing was the wood screws needed to actually bolt the bracket to whatever you're attaching it to. The instruction manual even says to use a couple of wood screws (not included). Given they gave you the more expensive pole in the box gratis, you'd think they'd throw in a few wood screws, but that's a minor quibble.

Once I got it up there and hooked up, I reran a scan on the TiVo. I was bloody well amazed at what it found! The total number of channels it found was 79. Granted, several of those are inactive, or are otherwise things I don't care about. There were also a couple of channels it found which were on neither antennaweb's or tvfool's reports. Since I live right outside of Dallas, the majority of these kinds of channels are spanish speaking something or other. Given that's not my language, they're of little interest to me. What WAS of interest to me are the major networks (PBS, ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, & one local "old UHF" channel that broadcasts Texas Rangers games).

All of these channels are quite strong. Even with the large tree outside and being in an attic, the average signal strength of these channels (according to the signal strength meter on the TiVo) is around 80-85 or so. PBS is a bit low (mid 60's), but the same friend who lives about 3 miles away from me says that PBS is his weakest signal too, but it's not an issue unless there's some epic storms out, but we're probably not watching much TV at that time anyway. At least one or two of the channels that are of lesser concern to me are quite strong - I had a couple of them as high as 98 on the meter : Oh, before I forget, in the Dallas area, the majority of the antennas (especially the major networks) are in the same general area, as it's the highest point in the general D/FW metroplex. According to tvfool, I'm anywhere from 28.2 to 30.7 miles from the transmitters (except for a few rogue close ones that are about 8 or 14 miles), and they all are 80-85 or so in an attic mounted, non powered antenna.

There is no signal booster on here. It's just the antenna that was in the box hooked up through a cable run that used to be used for Cable TV into my TiVo box, and then on into my HDTV, which is this, BTW. The quality is astounding. The signals are rock solid, and I have to say, I'm quite happy with my purchase of this antenna.

While the old rabbit ears worked "OK" enough (especially for $6), it wasn't quite a universal solution. I'd have to fiddle with the antenna depending on what I wanted to record. Given I TiVo everything, having to worry about where the antenna was pointed meant I was back to the pre-TiVo days of caring what the broadcaster's schedules were. Didn't like that, so I looked into what became this choice of antenna. I'm quite happy with it. I suppose the only negative I could say is that the antenna is sold as an outdoor antenna. When I was putting it together, I felt like it wouldn't hold up to extreme winds, and things of that nature outside. It works great, but if left outside to the elements, I'm not sure how well it would hold up. But as an attic antenna, it won't have to deal with any of that, so it should last a good long time up there.

I was inititally concerned that this being a "cheaper" antenna wouldn't function well enough as one that was into the $100 range or so. I was wrong. This works really quite well for me.
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200 of 220 people found the following review helpful
on August 28, 2009
Verified Purchase
We just moved to Santa Fe and wanted to get broadcast TV (I hate cable!) but most stations are near Albuquerque. According to [...], all of our stations are around 35-40 miles away. This antenna was very quick to install - it took my husband less than 15 minutes to install it on the roof, we then re-scanned our channels and picked up 26 digital channels. This includes all of the major broadcast channels including two PBS stations that are all crystal clear - a perfect picture. There are no trees or tall buildings around us, but there is a mountain range between us and Albuquerque so we were worried we wouldn't be able to pick up the channels. This was a great price, the antenna is not too large and obtrusive, and it works great for both UHF and VHF channels.
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54 of 58 people found the following review helpful
on April 2, 2011
Verified Purchase
After reading several reviews I decided to try this one. Living halfway between Boston and Providence there are just about as many channels in either direction, however they are not exactly in line. I printed out a diagram from Antennaweb.net and found that 90% of the channels were in either of 2 directions. The Boston area channels were approximately North and the Providence Channels were South West. I bought 2 of these antenna's and mounted them each at the top of a 10 foot mast. This is now mounted from the side of the top of the 2nd floor of the house pointed with 1 towards Boston and the other towards Providence. I now receive 32 channels most at 98% and 2 at 76 to 78%. The antenna I replaced was actually a very large one with a rotor. The Rotor quit during this winter so this is why I had to replace them. Using RG6U 75OHM lead up to only 1 matching transformer. The 2 antenna's are connected with 300ohm twin lead (Foam filled insulation) one antenna to the other then the 75ohm matching transformer is attached where the 2 meet this way you avoid using a 75ohm splitter/joiner with it's inherant signal loss. In the basement I am using an old Archer VHF-UHF-FM amplifier that boosts the signal about 6Db. May replace it with the newer kind since there are 3 more channels that show up at being 30% but the TV will not lock onto them. I am going to try to upload a photo to the photos for the product. By the way this Antenna is built in the USA in case anyone wants to buy a USA product. (says so on the box)
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on October 16, 2014
Verified Purchase
I wanted TV channels, but I DID NOT want a cable bill - opted for installing this fantastic little antenna and getting entirely too familiar with my attic space. I worked without a spotter, so I made a lot of trips up and down those stairs (putting my calf muscles, thigh muscles and sweat glands to the test). This latest DIY project only cost me a few well-spent dollars and a good bit of patience and it was well worth it. Once i got the antenna installed and correctly oriented, I went from 0 to 48 digital and analog channels! I'm also getting 9 radio stations.

Since I connected the antenna to two TVs (in family room and master bedroom), I decided to add a preamp. It proved to be very unnecessary so I returned it. Both TVs have incredibly clear video and audio - I'm very pleased.
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78 of 90 people found the following review helpful
on June 1, 2011
Verified Purchase
Product was easy to assemble, but I also had trouble with the 75/300 ohm TV Antenna Transformer Adapter.

Considering I had no instructional advice from the package, I preceded through the install by making hand tight connections. After several attempts to re-aim this antenna to improve reception, I purchased an amplifier to help increase the signal strength. This helped a bit, but my frustration was mounting and I sought the help of my neighbor, who is getting 99% reception from the UHF tower that was just 17.3 miles away. We initially thought I needed to get a UHF only antenna (one that was more like my neighbor had purchased).

After reading through all the reviews, I noticed references to problems with the adapter. I purchased a $2 replacement 75/300 ohm TV Antenna Transformer Adapter from Menard's. I very gently connected it to the RG6 cable, and then very gently connected this to the antenna. Now this antenna works great, and I'm hoping my review might help someone else.
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45 of 51 people found the following review helpful
on August 4, 2011
Verified Purchase
I could not be happier with this antenna. I live in the outlying valleys of Southern California, and all of our TV stations are generally clustered around Mt. Wilson, approximately 40 miles from my location. Before installing this antenna, an amplified 'inside' antenna could only pick up 2 digital channels in my house, 7 and 58.

The antenna comes with the antenna, of course, a transformer (a small device that attaches to screws on the antenna - the other end of this device is where you attach your cable), a mount and a J bar that attaches to the mount and the antenna. There is no antenna assembly - just click the pieces out, they are folded in for transport.

I extended the antenna arms, connected the transformer, and then connected the antenna to the J bar. I then mounted the mount onto my house, attached the J bar to the mount, and then moved the antenna to 287 degrees. (Use [...] to determine the correct degree for pointing your antenna). I attached a 100 foot RG6 cable (also from Amazon) to the transformer, and ran it into the input line for all of my house outlets.

Every TV in the house now gets 103 digital channels. Even after a 100 foot cable run and 2 splitters on every outlet in the house. This antenna is picking up stations from outside its target area, including one 55 miles away and 100 degrees away from the antenna direction. NO Pre-Amp installed. NO rotator! Just the antenna and some good RG6 cable.

You really just can't go wrong with this antenna. If you need an outdoor TV antenna, just get this one. The price is right and the quality of the signal is beyond belief.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2013
Verified Purchase
I just replaced my satellite dish with this antenna. Here is my opinion:

1.) Mounting of the antenna is simple. I like the way the u-bolt bracket digs into the mounting mast. I was able to attach it to my existing satellite mast (even though a new one came with the antenna), and there are no concerns with it falling or spinning around. It bites into the pole very well.

2.) The antenna is fully assembled. Very few attachments needed. I literally put the whole thing together with two sockets.

3.) The reception is impressive. I was not expecting what I received. As soon as the tv scanned, I received 31 channels, and I'm in an area that the scanning websites say I will get little to no service.

4.) I like the ability to just attach it to the satellite dish. Sure, it's not on top of my house, but it could have not been a more simple installation. Just bolt it on, and plug in the same cable from the satellite.

The installation was not much more than adding an indoor antenna. In the end, it's cheaper, too, because I am feeding 4+ tv's, versus buying indoor antennas for each of the tv's. I paid for one $40 antenna, and I am now saving $100 a month on satellite service. Sure, I pay for Netflix and an internet connection, but I was paying that anyway.

Today is a good day.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2012
Verified Purchase
I have tested the RCA 751 R side by side with the Clearstream4 Antennas Direct ClearStream4 HDTV Antenna and found the RCA 751 R provides better reception and more channels. The RCA 751 R was less than half the price of the Clearstream 4. I then combined the 2 of them and got even better reception. For pretty good indoor coverage, I recommend the RCA ANT 1500 RCA ANT1500 Digital Flat Passive Antenna. The 1500 does not provide as good reception as the larger outdoor 751 R, but is much smaller and more portable.
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