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RESTful Java Web Services Paperback – December 2, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-1847196460 ISBN-10: 1847196462

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (December 2, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847196462
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847196460
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,135,920 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jose Sandoval

Jose Sandoval is a software developer based in Canada. He's played and worked with web technologies since the Mosaic web browser was released into the wild, and for the last eight years he's consulted for various financial institutions and software companies in Canada and the US, concentrating in large-scale Java web applications. He holds a Bachelor of Mathematics degree from the University of Waterloo and an MBA from Wilfrid Laurier University.

Aside from coding and writing, he enjoys watching a good soccer match and coaching his son's soccer team. You can learn more about his interests at his personal web site josesandoval.com or his consulting firm's web site sandoval.ca.


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Customer Reviews

The book has sufficiently many typos and minor flaws that it becomes annoying.
Per Holst
Note, however, I completely lost the real meaning of the title and "RESTful Java Web Services" became "Java Web Services".
Jacek Laskowski
The reader is left to scour the web for supplement documentation and examples.
JB

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been waiting for a book on Java and REST for a few months, and when I saw this book included chapters on the Jersey and Restlet frameworks, I bought it without a second thought.

On the positive side, the book provides a decent introduction to four frameworks, Jersey, Restlet, RestEasy and the Rest plugin for Struts. The comparisons are useful, and in the Struts section the comparison to Ruby On Rails is also useful. In addition, I understand the JAX-RS standard a bit better after reading the book.

On the negative side:
* Lots of printed boiler plate code. Is there any reason to list full implementations of code on the page? Is there any reason to repeat large portions of it as it's discussed? Two of the frameworks implement the JAX-RS standard, and the *same code*, pages and pages of it, is printed in both chapters.

* A good deal of the code listings represent bad practice. Here, I referring to hand generated xml and json strings. The reader would have been better served with a chapter introducing ideas of binding objects to serializations, then a discussion of the various serialization libraries that are out there, especially JAXB and Json-lib. I would've discussed other content-types as well, especially xhtml.

* Where's WADL? A big gap with REST thus far is the lack of schemas, validation and type support. WADL is a step toward filling this hole. WADL isn't mentioned in this book, nor are the issues it's trying to solve. A discussion of JAXB would have fit nicely here as well.

In, summary, I'm aware that untyped languages like Ruby and Python are successfully employed in RESTful applications, but I was hoping that a book on RESTful Java would show how type safety and well defined APIs are compatible with the REST philosophy. This book doesn't provide that material, and I'm left to wonder why the authors chose Java as a language in the first place, as they leverage none of its strengths.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jacek Laskowski on August 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
Let me begin by acknowledging that although I've been playing with Java Web Services for a while I would hardly claimed myself fluent in the concepts of Web Services. I do lack extensive hands-on experience with Web Services in Java, and yet somehow, I passed Sun Certified Developer for Java Web Services (SCDJWS) 5. I've recently been asked to run the course SW502 Intermediate Web Services Using IBM Rational Application Developer V6 (its Polish code's XML48PL). That was when I truly touched the Java Web Services code accompanied with very old theory - mostly about JAX-RPC. It was as much devastating to my understanding of the latest Java Web Services developments (esp. JAX-WS that was not covered at all) as helpful since I finally found some spare cycles to fully delve into WS-I Basic Profile, syntax and semantics of SOAP protocol, WSDL and partially UDDI. It let me experience beloved Aha moment when gained real understanding of the differences between the Document vs RCP style binding as well as literal vs encoded use. It was very refreshing experience.

Shortly after it, I decided to read a book about Web Services in Java hoping to gain more current knowledge about the state of Java Web Services in Java EE 5 and the latest 6 editions. Contrary to the proverb "Don't judge a book by its cover", the cover of the book "RESTful Java Web Services" by Jose Sandoval seemed to have met my expectations. The title had all the words I was chasing understanding of (plus REST), and with its 234 pages seemed quite easy to digest. Entertained myself with the reading. Note, however, I completely lost the real meaning of the title and "RESTful Java Web Services" became "Java Web Services". I don't think it influenced my opinion about the book very much, though.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JB on November 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book gives a decent introduction to RESTful web services but that's about all. There is lots of filler. There are long code listings that add little value. Chapter 7 is 90% the same as chapter 5. The book covers each framework enough to build an simple application but skimps on advanced usages. The reader is left to scour the web for supplement documentation and examples. It would be a better book if it covered one framework and went into greater detail like RESTful Java with Jax-RS (Animal Guide).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cody Koeninger on August 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
...even though I checked it out from the library.

Get this if you want to see the exact same boilerplate code written in 3 different frameworks (4 if you count the rest easy chapter, which is literally a copy paste of the jersey chapter). Otherwise avoid it.
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