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Rabbit Redux [Kindle Edition]

John Updike
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (356 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $16.00
Kindle Price: $9.99
You Save: $6.01 (38%)
Sold by: Random House LLC

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Book Description

In this sequel to Rabbit, Run, John Updike resumes the spiritual quest of his anxious Everyman, Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom. Ten years have passed; the impulsive former athlete has become a paunchy thirty-six-year-old conservative, and Eisenhower’s becalmed America has become 1969’s lurid turmoil of technology, fantasy, drugs, and violence. Rabbit is abandoned by his family, his home invaded by a runaway and a radical, his past reduced to a ruined inner landscape; still he clings to semblances of decency and responsibility, and yearns to belong and to believe.

Books In This Series (5 Books)
Complete Series


  • Editorial Reviews

    Review

    "A superb performance, all grace and dazzle...a brilliant portrait of middle America." -- Life

    The assumptions and obsessions that control our daily lives are explored in tantalizing detail by master novelist John Updike in this wise, witty, sexy story. Harry Angstrom -- known to all as Rabbit, one of America's most famous literary characters -- finds his dreary life shattered by the infidelity of his wife, Janice. How he resolves -- or further complicates -- his problems, makes for a novel of the first order.

    "Updike owns a rare verbal genius, a gifted intelligence and a sense of tragedy made bearable by wit....A masterpiece." -- Time

    "An awesomely accomplished writer...For God's sake, read the book. It may even -- will probably change your life." -- Anatole Broyard

    "Dazzling." -- The Washington Post

    "A triumph." -- Newsday


    From the Trade Paperback edition.

    From the Publisher

    10 1.5-hour cassettes

    Product Details

    • File Size: 1558 KB
    • Print Length: 449 pages
    • Publisher: Random House; Reissue edition (July 23, 2010)
    • Sold by: Random House LLC
    • Language: English
    • ASIN: B003WUYRAY
    • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
    • X-Ray:
    • Word Wise: Not Enabled
    • Lending: Not Enabled
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #151,344 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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    Customer Reviews

    3.8 out of 5 stars
    (356)
    3.8 out of 5 stars
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    Most Helpful Customer Reviews
    137 of 151 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars Anti-Hero Trapped in Unhappy Marriage? Run! January 16, 2005
    Format:Paperback
    Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom was a high school superstar only a handful of years ago. Now he is a young married father, trapped in the suburban 60's, unhappy with a cluttered house, a drunken wife, and a son who will never be the athlete he was. Will this former basketball star find a way to make his life better, or will he run like a rabbit? The title says it all and Harry Angstrom does indeed run whenever things don't go his way.

    Leaving the house to pick up his son, he impulsively drives from his Pennsylvania home to West Viriginia. He wants to run to the sunny shores of Florida to live the life he feels he deserves. Surely a man like Rabbit deserves more in life, or so he imagines. Unable to complete this journey, he runs to his former coach, a tired and washed-up man who introduces him to a part-time prostitute. Rabbit moves in with Ruth that very night and they begin a relationship they flaunt and thus humiliate his very pregnant wife and both sets of parents.

    Is there an ounce of unselfishness in Rabbit? The reader may think so when he returns to his wife the night she goes into labor. Their reunion is bittersweet and because in large part of Rabbit's inability to see beyond his own needs, their reunion burst apart in a senseless tragedy that is horrific but so beautifully written the reader is glued to the page hoping against hope this terrible thing is not happening.

    Will Rabbit be able to grow up and realize he is no longer the high school hero? Will he be able to comfort his wife, to provide a home for her and his children? Will he forsake Ruth, the hooker who accepts him as he is but is now pregnant with his child? In which direction will Rabbit run this time?
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    68 of 73 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars I hated it so much I read the sequels June 6, 2006
    Format:Hardcover
    This is a Great Book - it must be - the NYT and other literary experts say so. Rabbit's life is awful - his wife's a drunk, his job sucks, nothing is really what he thought life would be. He tries to run away and fails at that too. According to Time magazine, Rabbit Angstrom is "an unflinchingly authentic specimen of American manhood". Yikes! Let's hope not - but maybe there is more truth in it than one likes to admit.

    It's hard not to recommend reading this book even though reading it is really not an enjoyable experience. Rabbit evoked powerful emotions in this reader - especially anger and depression; maybe a little anxiety. You are almost guaranteed to feel worse after you read this book - especially if you can identify with any part Angstrom's angst. On the other hand, the mature reader (er, middle-aged) who has experienced the fullness of life's sorrows may sort of shrug at Rabbit as if to say 'what did you expect from life? Pull yourself together, son.'

    Read at your own risk.
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    32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
    Format:Paperback
    Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, John Updike's monumental "everyman" creation has reached middle age, and we find him ten years after the previous book comfortably ensconced in his mother-in-law's home, running Springer Motors for her and Janice, and actually in love with his wife at last. The Angstroms have achieved the American dream and are even the center of their own little clique at a country club established for the nouveau riche.

    If you remember the Carter era, gas shortages, Cheryl Ladd replacing Farrah Fawcett in "Charlie's Angels" and Toyota's "Oh, what a feeling!" commercials, you will love this look back at America in 1979 and into the early 80's.

    A fatter, richer Rabbit dabbles in gold and silver, plays golf, and wages war with his son Nelson, now a student at Kent State. When Nelson drops out of college and returns home, Rabbit says, "I like having Nelson in the house. It's great to have an enemy. Sharpens your senses." Nelson is the worst of Rabbit, scared and running, torn between two women, impregnating and marrying one while too young to handle the responsibility, and taking off.

    Rabbit, though outwardly-satisfied and enjoying his affluent life, has never ceased mourning for what he cannot have. A young girl who enters his Toyota dealership reminds him so much of himself and Ruth, his lover from RABBIT, RUN, that he is convinced she is the daughter he never knew and is restless until he can confront Ruth about her. Janice, on the other hand, has matured into a suburban wife, playing tennis and lolling about the country club pool and in general convincing Rabbit to admit that the decade past has taught her more than it has taught him.

    The secondary characters in this installment are brilliant.
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    46 of 52 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars The first - a burst of intensity April 11, 2005
    Format:Paperback
    I always find it interesting that in a lot of extended series of novels, the first book tends to be compact and to the point, while later novels tend to be more sprawling and expanded. Glancing over my line of Updike's Rabbit novels, of which this is the first, that seems to be the case, but time will tell whether those later books successfully trade the taut intensity of this novel for a more spacious feel. The Rabbit novels take up four books, all tracing the life of Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, a man growing up in the latter part of the twentieth century, with each book taking place in a different decade, highlighting not only the changes in Harry but the changes in the country itself as it winds through the crazy years of the 1900's. This book takes place in the early fifties or late sixties and introduces us to the man himself, Rabbit, who does his best to fulfill the verb embedded in the title and run as far as he can. Harry feels trapped in his marriage, with a three year old already present and his wife heavily pregnant and drinking all the time, he takes a look at his dreary life and wigs out, trying to drive as far away as he can before coming back and attempting to find himself, with increasingly flailing results. His quests lead him to encounter a priest, a prostitute, an old coach and his parents and in-laws, all of whom have advice and none of which seem to have the right advice. So Harry tries to forge his own way but that might not be right either. Read more ›
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    Most Recent Customer Reviews
    5.0 out of 5 stars What a fantastic piece of writing
    What a fantastic piece of writing. Updike was way ahead of his time. A sometimes shocking insight in to ordinary American lives. Read rabbit run first then this. Loved it.
    Published 6 days ago by Orby
    3.0 out of 5 stars Must Have Been Fun to Write
    Even pornography can somehow earn a Pulitzer.
    Published 19 days ago by Dale Lund
    4.0 out of 5 stars A great read.
    A great read...........brings back many memories having lived during those years...........Rabbit has many facets....not all good but still turns out loveable. Read more
    Published 19 days ago by Carol B
    3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
    Rabbit is a loose cannon
    Published 21 days ago by michael vincent
    4.0 out of 5 stars Read it now
    I don't know why it has taken me so long to read Rabbit. But at last I meet him in all his faded glory and crudeness. Read more
    Published 23 days ago by RJD
    1.0 out of 5 stars I do not recommend
    One of the worst books I've ever read. I am trying to read all the books on the Pulitzer Prize list and this was one of the worst. I don't know how it won a prize. Read more
    Published 25 days ago by Juliann Neumann
    5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece of American Masculinity and American Repression
    It took me a while to get around to writing a review of this incredible book by John Updike. Processing the intense feelings and experience I had reading this piece was difficult,... Read more
    Published 1 month ago by Garrett Zecker
    5.0 out of 5 stars The best contemporary writer
    John Updike is the best contemporary writer I have read. As a Language Arts teacher, I appreciate the tremendous level of craft and mastery of the language as I read again this... Read more
    Published 1 month ago by Covacha Quauhtlatoa
    2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars
    Doesn't really stand the test of time...
    Published 1 month ago by J. Dubey
    2.0 out of 5 stars A very dark book
    I read this book because it was on the Time Magazine list of best books of the modern time period. I don't see how this book was rated so highly. Read more
    Published 1 month ago by D. W.
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    More About the Author

    John Updike was born in 1932, in Shillington, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Harvard College in 1954, and spent a year in Oxford, England, at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. From 1955 to 1957 he was a member of the staff of The New Yorker, and since 1957 lived in Massachusetts. He was the father of four children and the author of more than fifty books, including collections of short stories, poems, essays, and criticism. His novels won the Pulitzer Prize (twice), the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Rosenthal Award, and the Howells Medal. A previous collection of essays, Hugging the Shore, received the 1983 National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism. John Updike died on January 27, 2009, at the age of 76.

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