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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's Robin Cook on Steroids
Rabid is one of those reads that hit the ground at full speed and pick up momentum from there. Either T.K. Kenyon doesn't know where the brake pedal is or decided the hell with it, and frankly, I'd bet it was the latter. This is a full blown, balls-to-the-wall scorcher. Dual themes - out-of-control scientific research and[...]- make hot-as-the-devil premises and great...
Published on April 4, 2007 by Arthur Tirrell

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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Know What You're Getting Into
Rabid is a fun fantasy of religion and science. It's entertaining in part because author T K Kenyon (no periods after the initials, please) likes showing off her vast knowledge of both. And of pedophile priests.

But fantasy it is. Events and personalities here are just not credible. At various points I asked myself, Is this a parody? Here's a list of a few...
Published 22 months ago by Kurt Keefner


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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's Robin Cook on Steroids, April 4, 2007
This review is from: Rabid: A Novel (Hardcover)
Rabid is one of those reads that hit the ground at full speed and pick up momentum from there. Either T.K. Kenyon doesn't know where the brake pedal is or decided the hell with it, and frankly, I'd bet it was the latter. This is a full blown, balls-to-the-wall scorcher. Dual themes - out-of-control scientific research and[...]- make hot-as-the-devil premises and great platforms for the author's fascinating and often thought-provoking philosophical tirades. Whether science or religion, Rabid gives no quarter. These people are flawed, even hateful. Yet, you feel their pain, their doubt, their fear. They sear their way into your subconscious and in the end you love them and root for them because they are you. If the American priesthood is infested with [...], the underlying causes have never been explained better, made more exciting, or presented in a way that offers so much hope for the future. Get yourself a copy, strap yourself into your favorite chair, and find out what's really been going on in the places you never knew you'd need to start worrying about.

Also recommended: 'Bang BANG' by Lynn Hoffman, an inspiring read.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly readable yet surprisingly deep, December 6, 2007
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D. Dorset (Nashville, TN) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Rabid: A Novel (Hardcover)
I bought this book on a recommendation from a well-read friend, and after recently reading "Special Topics in Calamity Physics," "Saturday," and "Never Let Me Go," this book was exactly what I needed. At first blush, with its delightfully raunchy characters and turbo-charged pace, "Rabid" seems like a here-today, forgotten-tomorrow mass-market thriller you'd pick up in the front of an airport bookstore. However, this intelligent book has some intriguing, unusual themes stuck inside its highly digestible prose. The dialogue is, in my opinion, some of the best I've seen in any novel. The conversations amongst the characters are illuminating and entertaining without being unrealistic. Furthermore, as someone who has degrees in Biotechnology and Biomedical Engineering, I relished Kenyon's many references to laboratory culture.

Kenyon does an impressive job of juggling the four intertwined characters, and I was happy with three of the four endings. One of the character's endings just seemed abrupt and unfinished based on everything that had happened, but this didn't make me enjoy the book any less. This is an amazing and inspiring first effort. Kenyon skillfully teeters on the edge of absurdity with several of the elements in her plot; one almost expects her to take this plunge that many first-time novelists would indulge in, but she keeps the story firmly on the rails despite navigating amongst disparate settings.

If you're weary of a lot of the overwrought and unnecessarily obscure fiction that's been on the market lately and want a read that is unashamedly enjoyable yet thought-provoking, you won't go wrong picking up "Rabid."
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Know What You're Getting Into, September 3, 2012
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This review is from: Rabid: A Novel (Hardcover)
Rabid is a fun fantasy of religion and science. It's entertaining in part because author T K Kenyon (no periods after the initials, please) likes showing off her vast knowledge of both. And of pedophile priests.

But fantasy it is. Events and personalities here are just not credible. At various points I asked myself, Is this a parody? Here's a list of a few of the things in the story. MILD SPOILERS AHEAD. A priest who looks like Antonio Banderas (she doesn't say that specifically; she usually compares him to an angel). A scientist who illegally experiments with rabies. Another scientist who illegally experiments with HIV and discovers the secret to the soul. Rampant and blasphemous priestly pedophilia, graphically described. A person tortured by their mother until they become a Catholic zombie. Lots of "casual f***ing." Interesting but inconclusive debates between faith and science. References to Voltaire, Marx, Newman, Joyce, etc. A woman raping a man. Religious renditions. Nobody escapes the Italian Inquisition. END SPOILERS

Really, this novel is a comic book. Realism is left far behind. That's not a put down. There is a place in this world for comic books. Just don't get the idea that this is literary fiction, despite the fact that the author got her MFA at Iowa, the most prestigious writer's training camp in the US. In many ways this reads like well-crafted fan fiction and seems to be part of a general trend toward the excess that occurs in the absence of gatekeepers. (And I speak as a self-published author myself.)

So enjoy it in the spirit of fun, with enough intellectual icing on the cake to make you think you're being deep.

I can't resist recommending a novel that those who like Rabid may enjoy: Nevermore
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kenyon refuses to play the complacency game, November 14, 2007
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This review is from: Rabid: A Novel (Hardcover)
Rabid, by T.K. Kenyon, was released by Kunati, Inc. in Spring, 2007. It is an amazing book!
One word for this book: riveting. No, two words: riveting, compelling...actually, Rabid would take more words than I even know to use, and I'm a wordsmyth myself. I could not put it down.
T.K. Kenyon's Rabid is an amazing story. Masterfully woven plotlines and an absolute commitment to truth and utter refusal to play the complacency game left me feeling as if I had gone on an "explore" with the author. Kenyon has the gift of pulling the reader in to the world of her characters. She manages to make an untouchable character like Leila a sympathetic one.
I look forward to Kenyon's next novel. Can't wait.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very readable but..., April 10, 2008
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A reader (Highland Park, NJ) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Rabid: A Novel (Hardcover)
This book was interesting and certainly kept one's attention and raised some interesting issues. The only objections I have are that the logic was inconsistent, the picture of university politics not realistic, and a very, very minor one - its "Columbia" not "Colombia" University.
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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Far from perfect, June 30, 2007
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This review is from: Rabid: A Novel (Hardcover)
First of all, I must say that the reviews thus far have been far too quick to award this book with a 5-star rating! Rabid is periodically entertaining, but it is not flawless by any means.

The author has crafted a compelling narrative, but Rabid is often bogged down by superfluous scientific terminology. Unless you are a doctor or scientist, you will frequently be forced to consult your dictionary. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, but it quickly becomes tedious.

Also, the book could have used another edit -- several scenes could have been condensed or omitted altogether -- and the character development isn't entirely effective. I wanted to care about these fictional lives, but the character I felt was most complex was the doctor's mistress, Leila. You would never guess from the first chapter, in which housewife Bev finds a pair of underwear in her husband's suitcase (the first of countless cliches), but Leila is actually the main focus of the novel and the book really hinges on her fascinating personal struggles.

Rabid is worth a look, but don't expect an easy summer read or a literary classic. One thing is certain -- if you're reading it with a book club (which I did), it will certainly inspire some interesting discussion.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Elegant and Thrilling, July 7, 2007
This review is from: Rabid: A Novel (Hardcover)
Let me tell ya something about elegance. Elegance is
a matter of refinement and quality, sure. But it's
also a matter of complexity. Elegant things just have
more going on than things that are merely excellent.
You may disagree, but I find the Beatles excellent,
Bach elegant. You get my drift?

The first layer in this book is the question of murder itself.
We know from the outset that someone's going to
die, but we don't find out who until half-way into the
book. The author hasn't so much muddied the waters as
she's added levels to them. Is the victim to be
*the annoying and ambitious medical researcher? Could
be-he's unlikeable enough and no innocent creatures-or
readers- would miss him much.
*the graduate student with whom he is conducting an affair?
Maybe-she is brutally transgressive of all the rules of
female romantic life. She's the sort of heroine who is
always dispatched in the movies to reinforce the notion
that sin doesn't pay.
*how about the researcher's milquetoasty wife?
The researcher obviously wants her dead and from the way
her character is built, it seems that the author did too.
Her husband not only has the motivation, he has access to
all sorts of yummy viruses to do the job.
*or maybe it's the impossibly refined and educated priest
who's just arrived on the scene, sent by the Vatican to
lead their parish out of the inferno of a child-abuse
scandal and into the paradiso of something better. His
name, of course is Dante and he has the combination of
faith and doubt that is sometimes resolved in pulpier
novels by a heroic death.

Then there's the question of sex. (is sex a question?)
anyway, all the main characters are simmering with
unfulfilled lusts. Some, like Leila the grad student, are
ferociously acting out. (Leila is a deliciously
good acter-outer by the way). Others are celibate or so
repressed as to be semi-celibate. Does all this sexual
stewing have anything to do with the illicit sex that
Dante has been sent to stamp out? Or isit thematically
related to the HIV research going on in Leila's lab?

The science adds another layer, an elegant hypothesis
is teased out of the authorized and underground experiments.
The conjecture relates ultimately to questions of faith
which are another layer.

There is more, much more. The roles and rules of men and
women, the politics of institutions and the tidal waves
of ambition all weave threads that recur and fascinate.
What makes the whole thing work is that the author is bigger
than any of the devices she uses. Nothing is obvious, every
thread leads to another consideration without a hint of cliché.

So let's define something else: the word thrill. A thrill
is a shiver of delight-it's physical and mental and spiritual.
Suspenseful, erotic, many-layered and intelligent, Rabid is truly
an elegant thriller.

Lynn Hoffman, author of bang BANG, ISBN
9781601640005
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, but not bad, December 12, 2012
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Although described as Robin Cookish, I found no similarities. The story was less medical mystery and move fictionalized court drama.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Medical Thriller???, November 20, 2012
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Well I finished the book and have mixed feelings about it. My primary issue is that I wouldn't classify it as a medical thriller. OK, there is some medical stuff, and every once in awhile it's a bit thrilling BUT you have to wade through a whole lot of other "stuff" to get there. It's a bit convoluted with other topics appearing and reappearing a lot more often than the medical. Yes, priests, pedophilia, microbiology, chemistry and a whole lot of infidelity. So.. with that said I must also admit that I enjoyed the book though I did think about giving up a couple of times. For some reason I kept going back for more and in my estimation that means the book had to be "good" otherwise I would have left and never looked back. So, if you desire a good read with a lot of information that may or may not be valid (I really don't care if it is or isn't if it keeps my interest) some sex, a less than stellar priest etc. this is the book for you!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended!, June 9, 2011
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This review is from: Rabid: A Novel (Hardcover)
An outstanding thriller, Rabid is based on a plausible scientific hypothesis that reflects the author's scientific education and experience. On this she builds a psychological, legal and religious drama that captures and holds the reader's attention. The main characters are well drawn, deeply flawed human beings who still have something of the heroic in them.
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Rabid: A Novel
Rabid: A Novel by T. K. Kenyon (Hardcover - April 1, 2007)
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