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Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation Hardcover – October 30, 2012


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Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation + Inside the Minstrel Mask: Readings in Nineteenth-Century Blackface Minstrelsy + Forgeries of Memory and Meaning: Blacks and the Regimes of Race in American Theater and Film before World War II
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Trade (October 30, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230341829
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230341821
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,438 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"(Deggans is) the nation' premiere commentator on matters relating to race in the media...(Race-Baiter is) a troubling read, needless to say, but Deggans has done a thoughtful, sober and intelligent analysis." - Verne Gay, Newsday.
"Deggans, the first-rate media and TV critic for the Tampa Bay Times...makes a smartly-resented call for more civil discourse." - Ken Tucker, Entertainment Weekly.
"(An) incisive take on the state of our media culture. Mr. Deggans writes about race with clarity and wit." - Tene Croom, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

“Deggans makes a smartly presented call for more civil discourse.”—Entertainment Weekly

“Mr. Deggans writes about race with clarity and wit. He understands and explains the politics of the broadcast and cable networks and the logic of its programming decisions without letting them off the hook for falling short of their own goals.”--The Pittsburgh Post Gazette

“Troubling, detailed account of race and racism in today’s media.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Eric Deggans is one of the most insightful and provocative writers about television today.  In his columns for the St Petersburg Times and his NPR commentaries, Deggans has established himself as a voice worth listening to. His many fans -- and I'm one of them -- will devour this book.”—Andy Borowitz

"If you care about this country, if you want to take part in a citizen’s movement that helps heal the deep racial, economic, and cultural divides tearing us apart, you must read Eric Deggans’ Race-Baiter. No book of recent vintage so thoroughly dissects the media’s monetized appetite for division. Provocative, honest, and smart, Race-Baiter is a supremely important book. Read it and let the conversation begin."--Connie May Fowler, Author of Before Women had Wings

“Eric Deggans proves that he is one of the most insightful and courageous writers covering today's fast-shifting media landscape. This is an important book.”—Michele Norris, NPR's All Things Considered and founder of The Race Card Project

 

From the Author

The story of how I came to write my first book, Race-Baiter, also outlines why the book is so necessary, and how its lessons can help legions of consumers cut through the toxic messages clogging modern media.

I was searching through my email one evening years ago, when I stumbled on a message from a reader I'd never met.

 "Any idea why Bill O'Reilly called you a racist hate monger tonight?" he wrote. "Congratulations!"

To be honest, I wasn't that surprised. Ever since I criticized the Fox News Channel star for using code words and unfair tactics to demonize black rappers in a 2002 prime time special, O'Reilly had always reserved a special bit of televised bile for me.

After I dropped a column in the St. Petersburg Times newspaper highlighting the racially-charged language he used in describing Hurricane Katrina victims, he'd called me "a dishonest, racially motivated correspondent writing for perhaps the worst newspaper in the country." And this latest attack, aired as part of O'Reilly's Talking Points Memo segment on April 7, 2008, was no different.

"One of the biggest race baiters in the country writes for the St. Petersburg Times newspaper," he thundered to an audience of millions. "Eric Deggans also serves as the chairman of the Black Journalist Media Monitoring Committee. Deggans takes delight in branding people racist. Senator Joseph McCarthy would love this guy."

Besides getting the name of my group wrong - it's the National Association of Black Journalists, a group which has advocated for accurate news coverage of African Americans since the mid-1970s - O'Reilly revealed a time-honored tradition in his response to my work.

Bullies such as O'Reilly often try to silence those who criticize their clumsy words on race by accusing the critics themselves of racism.

What really stood out here was his larger message; that people in his audience -- largely, older, middle class and white - could trust him to cut through the clutter of talk about racial oppression in America.

In O'Reilly's world, this outrage only works one way; his outrage was focused only on allegedly unfair accusations of racism against white people.

He had no words or sympathy for when people of color might balk at seeing then-Fox News colleague Glenn Beck accuse the nation's first black president of having a "deep-seated hatred of white people" or radio pundit Rush Limbaugh might laugh at a parody song he created called "Barack the Magic Negro."

O'Reilly's true goal: drawing his audience closer to him by leveraging his own unfair accusations of racism and prejudice. Even as the nation was preparing to elect its first black president, the Fox News anchor was taking advantage of any feelings his audience might have of discomfort and fear to encourage viewers bond with him by rejecting those who might talk about racial oppression.

This is, in part, how O'Reilly has become the most-watched host on cable TV news; a towering figure who often scores high in viewer polls listing America's most influential journalists, despite the fact that he isn't a journalist and twists facts like taffy to serve his purposes.

And anyone who opposed his efforts was likely to be slapped with a term whose pejorative power shuts down all debate: race baiter.

Flash forward a few years, and you see that tactic spread across an entire chunk of major media outlets.

Once upon a time, media outlets earned revenue by gathering the biggest crowds, selling advertisers access to them. But in today's fragmented media environment, many of the fastest-growing platforms pursue the biggest pieces of that audience - I call it the Tyranny of the Broad Niche - and they have found leveraging prejudice and stereotypes effective in drawing audience.

My book, Race-Baiter, offers a handy road map to decoding these tactics and defusing them. The topics include: Fox News' use of scary black people to motivate viewers; the history of how corporations turned angry white men on radio into a moneymaking formula; the uneasy questions raised by activist Al Sharpton's dual role as MSNBC anchor and advocate for the family of slain teen Trayvon Martin; the way a lack of poverty coverage has allowed politicians to demonize the poor for under-informed audiences.

In a tribute to how far we have already come on these discussions, it is generally accepted that mainstream society rejects outright racism and prejudice. Which means the best way to defeat such techniques in modern media is simply to expose them; drag implicit messages meant to work on the edges of your mind into the light, as explicit themes the audience must consciously accept or reject.

Of course, by doing that, you risk being accused of bringing up stereotypes and prejudice unfairly.

You risk being called a race baiter.

But sometimes, having that title hung on you by the right people means mostly one thing: You're on the right track.

More About the Author

Eric Deggans serves as TV/Media Critic for the Tampa Bay Times, Florida's largest newspaper. Some people call him the most critical guy in the place, because he's served as TV critic, Pop Music Critic and Media Critic at various times. He also provides regular commentaries on TV for National Public Radio and writes about media issues for the National Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University.

Raised in Gary, Indiana, he earned a degree in journalism from Indiana University, working at newspapers in Pittsburgh, Pa. and Asbury Park, N.J. before landing in Florida. A drummer for more than 30 years, he performed in a band signed to Motown Records in the late 1980s and still plays the occasional show with local artists. He has won awards for his journalism from the Florida Society of News Editors, the National Association of Black Journalists, the Society for Features Journalism and American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors; his work also has appeared in the Washington Post, Seattle Times, Chicago Sun-Times, Ebony magazine and Rolling Stone Online.

Customer Reviews

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It is well written by a very articulate author.
Dirtlawyer
I highly recommend this book to anyone who is a conscientious adult, cares about the world and is willing to think outside of the box.
Coach Michele Reeves
This book give the reader a chance to think, understand and watch.
A. Zakowski

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Shane Tiernan on November 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Great view into journalism, media and race relations. I haven't read any other books on the subject but this seemed to be a fair assessment of what goes on "behind the scenes" and often right in front of our faces.

Mr. Deggans gives away the magician's secrets, whether those magicians are news anchors, radio talk show hosts, screenplay writers or"reality" shows actors, he tells you what to look for to understand what's really happening and how they make it look or sound like something else.

He talks about the problems people have with discussing race, suggests ways we can get past those problems. He talks about drawing attention to racism masked with key phrases and probably most importantly about talking about race before something racial explodes rather than waiting for things to explode.

Another interesting point is that "color blindness" isn't the answer because it ignores differences in culture that really do exist.

A lot of this should be in schoolbooks somewhere. Learning it when your 9 would probably be a lot more helpful than learning it when you're 39.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Diane on April 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I learned so much from this book. I was reassured by Deggans' balanced approach. His point that we the audience must demand balanced, honest, and informed journalism is well taken.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By P. Williams on January 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For those who are interested in whether the media manipulates what we think about, this is an excellent primer. Race Baiter also provides categories to evaluate media and critique content. Provides current social media as well. As journalism professor, I highly recommend.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By peaches on January 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I found this book to be thought-provoking, many times in an uncomfortable way. I would definitely recommend to anyone interested in current events and media/politics , as the author provides insight in a way that is easy to understand.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dirtlawyer on November 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have always suspected that publishers, producers, and similar persons selected characters that followed their visions of persons. This book confirmed my suspicion. It is well written by a very articulate author.

My only problem with the book is Deggans obvious respect for Al Sharpton, probably because Deggans is too young to remember that Sharpton himself uses race to advance his own agenda. Deggans does not mention the pogrom he started in Harlem that had a killed a couple of people. A review of the early NY Times stories on Sharpton might help.

Over all, though, the book should be read by everyone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cara Ojiem on January 9, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a really well written, intelligent, and in depth look at a subject many people tend to try to sweep under the rug. I applaud the author for starting a way to rationally discuss these issues without pointing fingers or inciting anger. Thoroughly researched and backed up with well documented data and facts...a must read for any one who believes these issues are important...which should be everyone...
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By melissa on August 14, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have to be honest.. I skimmed through the book. I understood his opinions but I've heard many of his thoughts through history courses in college.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gderf on March 25, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Deggans parlays great familiarity with his topic in providing extensive insights on media practice and underlying ideology. He makes a good case that commentators use racial issues to create controversy to expand their product. It's not just Fox-News. It's mostly about programs and commentators that I don't generally watch or listen too. I catch Rush Limbaugh and Laura Schlesinger only on radio on one a year vacation trips. Most of the others I am totally unfamiliar with. About the only exception is "Meet the Press" where Deggans shows reverse prejudice against middle aged white men. None the less the book provides instructive background on an important topic. It's well worth reading.
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