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Rachel Ray Paperback – September 10, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-1162681375 ISBN-10: 1162681373

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (September 10, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1162681373
  • ISBN-13: 978-1162681375
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 9.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'a welcome reprint of a rare novel of Trollope's and one of his more idyllic Birmingham Post

'Excellent editions with accessible and helpful introductions. Certainly ideal for undergraduate teaching. Dr L. G. Turton, Birmingham Polytechnic

'a welcome reprint of a rare novel of Trollope's and one of his more idyllic' Birmingham Post --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

As young adult, Trollope endured seven years of poverty in the General Post Office in London before accepting a better-paying position as postal surveyor in Banagher, Ireland in 1841. The years in Ireland formed the basis of his second career delineating clerical life in small cathedral towns. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By H. Curtler on April 11, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One must make allowences for the occasional sloppiness of Trollope's writing, given the serialized format and the incredible number of novels he wrote while working full-time for the post office. He always has something important to say and usually says it well. This novel is one of his shortest and one of his best. Like George Elliot and Charles Dickens, Trollope was dragged kicking and screaming into industrialized England in the 19th century. And, like them, he saw beneath the glitz and glamor of new-found wealth and the breakdown in social classes that followed the Reform movement in England. He seems at times to be overly preoccupied with the demise of the "lady" and the "gentleman," but this concern reveals a well-founded alarm over the vanishing of such Victorian values as "nobility" and "duty to others." In this novel he expresses many of those concerns while targetting the Evangelicals, an attack that is right-on and timely indeed. He reveals the hypocrisy of so many of those who are filled with resentment and hatred of their fellow humans while professing to bask in the love of Christ.

I would rate this novel, alongside The Warden, as first-rate and excellent ways to come to Anthony Trollope, who is, in my view, a vastly under-rated writer, despite his flaws.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By J. Cochran on March 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
Rachel Ray is (IMHO) the least of Trollope's longer works. Set in a pleasant country town, with a terribly pleasant cast of characters, the novel is, well, ..... pleasant .... without ever offering anything more for the reader. I suppose there are some who would say that Trollope's genius was to write a work that was as pleasant as its setting, but after seeing how good he is at social novels (e.g., The American Senator, The Way We Live Now) and more excitingly peopled romances (e.g., The Claverings) this book was, for me at least, a real let-down. The plot involves a young girl who is certain of the affections of her suitor even when (highly contrived) circumstances make it appear to all around her that he is, in fact, a jilt. Don't read this next sentence if you plan on reading the book: Surprise! Little Rachel was right all along and her lover in fact marries her. *YAWN!*

Along the way, there are a lot of fairly typical Trollopian subplots dealing with country families putting on town airs, modernization of the brewing industry, and other fun stuff that does illuminate nineteenth-century country life for the twenty-first-century reader. But none of it is particularly compelling, at least not for me.

Bottom line: I adore Trollope and have read most of his output, but if I were to rank his works Rachel Ray would be near, or even at, the bottom.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Carol Bakker on February 14, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Beer and evangelicals: that's what you'll find in Anthony Trollope's Rachel Ray.

What Luke Rowan cares about is brewing good beer. He inherits a portion of the brewery of Messrs. Bungall and Tappitt, gentlemen who consistently made muddy, disagreeable beer. Naturally Mr. Tappitt objects to an upstart nephew suggesting ways to improve his beer. To Tappitt, beer is business; Luke thinks there is a great deal of poetry in brewing beer.

He is "a young man, by no means of the bad sort, meaning to do well, with high hopes in life, one who had never wronged a woman, or been untrue to a friend, full of energy and hope and pride. But he was conceited, prone to sarcasm, sometimes cynical, and perhaps sometimes affected." Perhaps the greatest compliment is that Luke "had the gift of making himself at home with people."

In the character of Dorothea Prime, Rachel's widowed sister, Trollope takes aim at pharisaical pietism. "Her fault was this: that she had taught herself to believe that cheerfulness was a sin."

Nice things aggravated her spirits and made her fretful. She liked the tea to be stringy and bitter, she liked the bread to be stale; --as she preferred also that her weeds should be battered and old. She was approaching that stage of discipline at which ashes become pleasant eating, and sackcloth is grateful to the skin. The self-indulgences of the saints often exceed anything that is done by the sinners.

Sweet Rachel Ray is the antithesis of her sister. "She walked as though the motion were pleasant to her, and easy,--as though the very act of walking were a pleasure." Rachel's sister wants to keep her cloistered at home, leaving only for church services and afternoon teas at Miss Pucker's house.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joost Boswijk on September 27, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An easy read, but certainly not the best Trollope wrote. The characters don't come to live, and the part about the elections, which quite often Trollope describes well, falls flat. The other Trollope speciality, a hunt, is missing. All in all, the book is rather bland.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Martin Ternouth on March 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Having read all forty-seven of Trollope's novels, I would recommend Rachel Ray as the first one to read for someone unfamiliar with Trollope's work. The book is relatively short, Rachel is a delightful person, the plot is simple, the anti-evangelical theme is typical Trollope, the sense of place is good, and it all ends happily. What's not to like?
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Format: Paperback
I am a big fan of Trollope's and have read several of his large and well known books. I can see where many reviewers see this as minor or too easy of an entertainment. However, he accomplished his message very very well. There is a lot to chew on here:

1. Rachel and Mrs. Prime: How are they bucking "feminine" expectations? One can see that in their own way, they truly are.
2. Small town relationships: it's fascinating how rumors spread and affect people's lives so much. I grew up in larger city, but a small Greek parish-I have seen this in play with my own two eyes.
3. The "want of propriety" that Mrs. Prime, Miss Pucker, and Mrs. Tappitt accuse Rachel of-it was clear that Trollope was satirizing these viewpoints. He makes it clear that the only thing Rachel does is look pretty and some guys notice her. It is a story as old as time-resenting someone who is endowed with many natural gifts.
4. Mr. Tappitt's complex reaction to his business-at root can be understandable...perhaps Luke's approach could have been different?
5. Isn't depressing that the Glencora-esque Butler Cornbury lady is seen as a fairy godmother of sorts? Why?

I think that this "shorter" and "lesser" Trollope story still deals with complex issues and lessons, and the characters, particularly Mrs. Prime, are very interesting. My only quibble is the jarring anti-Semitic language that I have already seen extensively in Trollope. It's still not fun hitting those parts.
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