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93 of 99 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXACTLY what I've been looking for...for a LONG time!
I have been searching and hoping to find a book that covers this topic. And HERE it is, like an early Christmas present! There are so many books out there about nutrition, but they are not written for people who train their behinds off 6-7 days a week.
I love the way this book talks about WHEN to eat and how that affects your body.
I am happy Matt included...
Published on December 18, 2009 by Chad Tibbetts

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237 of 264 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Addition but Touts Disproven Physiology Theories
Fitzgerald is a great training resource, and I was very excited to get this book as weight is not addressed enough in the sport of running and how it can affect performance.

Unfortunately, he does fall back into some of the party-line statements about diet and calorie consumption that have been outdated or completely disproved.

For instance, he touts...
Published on January 12, 2010 by Amazon Customer


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93 of 99 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXACTLY what I've been looking for...for a LONG time!, December 18, 2009
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This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
I have been searching and hoping to find a book that covers this topic. And HERE it is, like an early Christmas present! There are so many books out there about nutrition, but they are not written for people who train their behinds off 6-7 days a week.
I love the way this book talks about WHEN to eat and how that affects your body.
I am happy Matt included different specifics for different endurance sports. This is not just a running book. It's for rowers, cyclists, triathletes, and anyone who knows what its like to workout for over an hour.
I think that knowing and understanding some of the science behind what happens to your body when you work out and when you eat helps to stay committed to getting to "racing weight".

Plus, I've always wondered what the top athletes really eat...and now I know. It's all here, and it couldn't come at a better time for me since I happen to be in the middle of training for the Boston Marathon and struggling to lose these last stubborn 15 lbs.

This book is helping me understand why the pounds are there, why they stay there, and how to shed time...I can't wait :)

[...]
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237 of 264 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Addition but Touts Disproven Physiology Theories, January 12, 2010
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This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
Fitzgerald is a great training resource, and I was very excited to get this book as weight is not addressed enough in the sport of running and how it can affect performance.

Unfortunately, he does fall back into some of the party-line statements about diet and calorie consumption that have been outdated or completely disproved.

For instance, he touts the discredited theory that muscle burns 40-50kcal per pound whereas fat only burns 3-5kcal. This factors heavily into his argument for being lean rather than just light, but it IS NOT TRUE. Muscle does burn more calories, but the two numbers are more like 4-6kcal/lb for muscle and 3-5kcal/lb for fat. It is a small difference overall.

And he also touches on nutrient timing for performance, which is GOOD. But he too easily slips into saying that you can also change up the times of the day that you eat in order to lose more weight. Also, not so much.

So... not a bad book and it addresses an underrepresented topic, but check sources and make sure that you really trust what he is saying before committing 100% to his statements.
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60 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a terrific book!, November 30, 2009
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This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
I love this book. Filled with great, down to earth info on maintaining weight and not the latest fads in diet. The fact that it's also "sport specific" is really a welcome feature as well. I learned something new reading each chapter. I also like the fact that when a statement is made, it's backed with research and not conjecture.
It doesn't hurt that the author seems to a likable guy and writes in a nice breezy style. Just the last chapter (Supplements) was worth the price!
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I finally know my Optimum Performance Weight, January 5, 2010
This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
Racing Weight: How to Get Lean For Peak Performance
By Matt Fitzgerald
Velopress, 2009, 288 pages, $18.95
Reviewed by Charles Kyle (chuckkyle@me.com)

Like many other books on cycling fitness, I picked up Racing Weight purely do to advertising within Velonews. I really had minimal expectation and figured that this book would layout the obvious points that many others do at each publication. The first thing that caught my attention was the second chapter entitled, "How to Determine Your Optimal Performance Weight". Noticing that it was just a mere 21 pages from the beginning, I resisted the urge and started on page one. Unlike many other writers, Matt Fitzgerald kept my interest peaked as he explained the five steps outlined in Racing Weight. My eagerness to jump to page twenty-one was set to rest as I began highlighting information just in the introduction.

Chapter Two continued information that I have been looking for since my first cycling event over a decade ago. My calculation of what I felt would be a good "weight" was close, but the concept of BMI had only been a reading that I saw on the three hundred dollar Tanika scale that sits on my bathroom floor, not something that I would train towards. Though I had to read chapter two twice, to gain a firm grasp of the concepts, I walked away with the ability to log onto TrainingPeaks and enter a season goal, based on knowledge and research, not a blind assumption on my part. I now know my BMI Goals. Notice I did not talk weight goals, why not, read Chapter Two and you too will be thinking is this manner.

Matt continues his book by articulating the five steps to achieve this Optimized Weight. The steps are simply improving your diet, balancing your energy sources, timing your nutrition, managing your appetite and training right. Though this information is sporadically found in other books, Racing Weight lays them out concisely and provides a simple means of calculation, unlike other books trying to account for the number of calories in that last Mocha. Matt's methodology looks at food in a more holistic view, based on quality not on strictly counting. Yes, that Snicker's has carbs but should it really be counted as part of the typical 60-20-20 carb, fat, and protein ratio?

Matt finishes off the book with a chapter showing what a professional athlete consumes, a chapter giving the recipe of some "Endurance Fuel", and finally the obligatory appendix on some strength exercises. I am looking forward to trying some of the recipes. Matt also includes a very informative chapter on the roles of supplements, which many cyclists will find interesting.
All in all, Racing Weight is well written and a fast read. Mine is now littered with highlights, notes, and sticky flags and will become part of my daily reference library. This is necessary read for all amateur cyclists who desire to take their training and racing to the next step.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Missing One Vital Detail, August 16, 2011
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Tejas Lobo (Dallas, TX USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
While I did appreciate a lot of the information in this book, I found one piece of very critical information missing: what an acceptable rate of weight loss is for an endurance athlete.

My motivation for buying this book was that I wanted to be able to keep fueled for my training without performance loss while losing body fat. Whenever I've successfully lost weight in the past, I have felt really sluggish and had a tough time getting through my workouts. So I was hoping this book would provide the solution to that.

As instructed in the book, I put a lot of work into counting calories (calories in), calculating my caloric needs (calories out) and determining my ideal weight, but these pieces of information are useless unless you know how to create a caloric deficit. This is where I really wanted guidance. How fast should I shoot to lose the weight? How many fewer calories can I consume without sacrificing performance? I know the standard line is that 2 lbs. per week is safe, but is that ideal? The book doesn't address any of these questions. I feel that it left me hanging right at the point when I almost had my answer.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic approach, January 1, 2010
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This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
Logically put together, Racing Weight creates a step by step process to analyze your current weight and to determine where you want to be and how to get there. From an author who has written in bits and pieces on many of the presented topics, it is really nice to have everything and more in one place. The suggestions for exercise and diet modification are perfect for anyone wanting to improve performance by reaching an optimal weight.

There are calculations involved, but they are explained and easy to follow. After reading tons of nutrition/diet books, I wouldn't have thought it possible, but from beginner through elite, this book really does offer something to everyone!
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36 of 46 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Major omission in dietary advice, February 21, 2010
This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
This long overdue book with advice about reaching your ideal racing weight in various types of sport (running, cross-country skiing, cycling, rowing and swimming) is well-written and very informative. I would recommend it for (almost) everyone who wants to lose weight and lean up for peak performance. As a vegan, I have one very serious problem with the dietary advice though. Good (quality) food types are arbitrarily divided into fruit, lean protein, whole grain, low fat dairy and essential fats. Athletes are supposed to eat at least one and in some cases more than one serving of each of these categories, to maximize their nutrition. Fine and dandy. Problem is, one of the mainstays of vegan nutrition - and in many cases omnivore nutrition as well - is simply ignored. That is of course beans and legumes. You won't find a word of advice about eating healthy, carb- and protein-loaded (not to mention fiber & a host of other nutrients including calcium!) beans of a wide variety, and other legumes such as lentils. That is like writing a book about opera and leaving out Puccini or Verdi! A major error like this makes me question other assumptions and conclusions. Who edited this book? Anybody with at least a working knowledge of nutrition knows that beans and legumes play an invaluable role in a healthy diet.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty Standard really, January 7, 2010
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This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
This was a solid book but I found that the ideas and concepts mirrored quite closely concepts found in many other books. The unique idea expressed or implied that it had key information for shaving off final pounds for the already fit wasn't quite accurate as the concepts would be the same for weight loss across the board. Still, it was well done and well written.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Common Knowledged packaged for newbies..., August 23, 2010
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This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
This book will be helpful to beginning athletes or those who have been training awhile but have no idea what they are doing, or have never approached an endurance sport in a serious way. It takes concepts that are commonly known by experienced athletes and puts them in one publication. Everything here can be gleaned from other readings but this at least makes it convenient. I can't find anything here that I either hadn't learned myself or learned from others over the past 30 years of endurance racing, from swimming to cycling to running or even backpacking. If you've been at it a long time in a serious way you already know everything that is presented in this book and probably could add a few things of your own.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars offers insight, but didn't quite have it, June 18, 2010
This review is from: Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance (Paperback)
I really struggled with whether to give this book a 3 or 4. I did get a lot out of it, and it was well written and edited. The concept was exactly what I need, and for the first 1/3 to 1/2 the book, I was totally into it.
Eventually, though, three things started to bug me.
One was that, sure he quoted lots of research, but some of the research he quoted was ridiculous! I recall him mentioning one study that took place over 36 hours with 17 women. Excuse me? Agreed, he points out the study's shortcomings, but then why refer to it at all?
Two - I expected a lot more information about "the Racing Weight Program." The actual program, if you could call it that, took up very little space and offered very little information. I like the concept, but we really should have been given more information about food. For example, where on the list lies lentils? If nuts are a lean protein then are they also a healthy fat?
Three - he often refers to "gym exercisers" in an unappealing way, and made one statement that was outright untrue. At one point he suggests that "gym exercisers" use cardio only for fat loss. Well I've been a "gym exerciser" for many, many years and I always used cardio for fitness, and HIIT to bring up that fitness the most possible amount in the least amount of time. Tons of people don't have the time for 2-hour runs and 4-hour bike rides. I found that a little insulting.
In the end I did get information from this book, and appreciated the sports-specific weight training at the end, so I give it a 3.5 rating.
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Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance
Racing Weight: How to Get Lean for Peak Performance by Matt Fitzgerald (Paperback - December 1, 2009)
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