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Radar Man: A Personal History of Stealth Paperback – October 5, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse.com (October 5, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1450248020
  • ISBN-13: 978-1450248020
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,135,944 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Duane E. Halpape on November 15, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In 1960, after the Russians downed Gary Powers' U2, an airplane that used high altitude as its primary defense, the need for new stealthy technologies became eminently apparent. Little did the world know that work was already in progress on a successor aircraft at that time. Radar Man is the life story of Ed Lovick, the man who became the chief advisor to Lockheed Skunk Work's Kelly Johnson and how he and his small team were able to develop methods of reducing the RCS (Radio Cross Section) enough to subsequently increase its survivability against the Russian's Surface to Air Missile (SAM) and Air to Air (AAM) missile attacks. This book documents the story of those technological developments in an easily read, layman's-term narrative. Ed intertwines his personal history, with the technologies and developments that were used, along with his unique perspective of the events, humorous incidents, and people with whom he worked.

In the fall of 1957, Ed joined the Lockheed Skunks Works, and was part of a small team of scientists tasked by Kelly to study ways to increase the survivability of the U-2 by reducing its RCS. During the following two year effort, Ed describes what was done to the U-2 as well as studies of other aircraft configurations that could survive this Russian threat. In 1959, the A-12 was born when the Skunk Works study report concluded that a high degree of airplane survivability could be achieved as follows: "A strong recommendation for a very high speed, very high altitude flight to hinder radar detection in addition to incorporation of materials and shaping in the original designs to reduce radar reflectivity.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Szekeres on January 12, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The rest is great if you're up on radio theory. The first third is like sitting at your grandpa's knee. There are stories about when he was little doing stuff with his buddies. The go off on tangents that end abruptly with no real end. Once the book gets into the technological side of things that's where the great stuff is. If you have a knowledge of radio theory it's a VERY interesting look at how early stealth was achieved and how later aircraft just might achieve that today.

The highlight for me was the story behind the design decisions behind the F-117 and why the angles were designed in their very very specific configurations. It's not the reason you think.
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By Boson18 on June 20, 2014
Format: Paperback
For anybody interested in radar/electronics this book should be right up your alley also. Its pretty interesting looking back and seeing how serious the engineers used to be at SkunkWorks. Would definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in defense history even if they don't have a physics/electronics background. The physics in the book makes it just that much better though if you have an idea of what's going on.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By H. Drabek on June 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The work seemed as if the author was just running through a series of memories that dont flow together. Surprisingly though there was some good material. A bit too technical for a lot of readers
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