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Radical Ecopsychology: Psychology in the Service of Life (Suny Series in Radical Social and Political Theory) Paperback – February 21, 2002


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Product Details

  • Series: Suny Series in Radical Social and Political Theory
  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: State University of New York Press (February 21, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0791453049
  • ISBN-13: 978-0791453049
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,451,299 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

...a provocative look at the philosophical concepts (and conceits) that underlie...a radical new form of social thought. -- Jeremiah Creedon Utne, Dec 2002 --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From the Back Cover

Personal in its style yet radical in its vision, Radical Ecopsychology offers an original introduction to ecopsychology-an emerging field that ties the human mind to the natural world. In order for ecopsychology to be a force for social change, Andy Fisher insists it must become a more comprehensive and critical undertaking. Drawing masterfully from humanistic psychology, hermeneutics, phenomenology, radical ecology, nature writing, and critical theory, he develops a compelling account of how the human psyche still belongs to nature. This daring and innovative book proposes a psychology that will serve all life, providing a solid base not only for ecopsychological practice, but also for a critical theory of modern society. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By R. Parker on September 12, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Radical Ecopsychology is a thoughtful and sophisticated discussion of a new direction which the science of psychology might take; it raises important issues, and I think everyone in the field would benefit from reading it. The reader from Berkeley touched on what is probably the central issue, with the (incorrect) observation that the book "...suffers from the naivite of believing that Cartesian dualism can be resolved with a simple reference to an 'embodied self'". In fact, Andy Fisher draws on the work of philosopher Gene Gendlin, who actually has shown a way in which philosophy can appeal to experience and Cartesian dualism can be resolved. Of course, this sounds impossible. Many (like the reviewer from Berkeley) will reject such a claim a priori, much like the Aristotelian astronomers who refused to look through Galilleo's telescope. But this new direction is important, and open-minded people will want to explore it.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Robert Black on October 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
An excellent overview of ecopsychology. A bit philosophical with lots of academic language, but its well worth the work of reading. It contains a lot of radical ideas. This is an important addition to the growing body of text about ecopsychology.
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By Joanna on May 19, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like his premise and I think it's right on. A primary text on a new field that I think will be very influential once folks start to realize how profoundly disconnected we are from our relationship from land and wildlife and why it matters.
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22 of 57 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is basically just a collection of eco-literati quotes. It proves only one thing: people will try to buy themselves into any club with hyper-flattery. Unless you really think you have to, don't bother to read this book. It contains virtually nothing new. And contrary to David Abram's endorsement, it is neither poetic nor profound. The author spends more than half of the book explaining why and how he wants to talk about Radical Ecopsychology (as if that were a valid concept to begin with) and then spends the rest of the book apologetically emphasizing that he can only vaguely indicate what Radical Ecopsychology would look like, if he were really writing about it. Then there's a little eco-polemic thrown in for good measure.
The only interesting idea that I could glean from the book at all is simply that our alienation from nature has an impact on our "mental health". It seems to be an attempt to define psychologically "normal" in terms of ecology. But like all of psychology, the thesis suffers from the problem of validating the concept of "normal". In this case, you would have to clearly define what you mean by "natural" - no lighter a task. While the thesis might be interesting, it is hardly profound and I doubt that it merits a whole book, let alone an entire new academic field - not to mention that academics will never make a substantial contribution to saving the environment anyway. Quibbling about theories is not going to stop the corporations from decimating the biosphere!
The book also suffers from the naivite of believing that Cartesian dualism can be resolved with a simple reference to an "embodied self". While this may make for sellable (to the David Abram fan-club) popular writing, it will hardly satisfy those looking for a philosophically viable answer.
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