Radical Face

Like (3)
|

Stay Up To Date

Sorry, there was an error with your request.
Sorry, there was an error with your request.
You are subscribed to new release e-mails for Radical Face.
You are no longer subscribed to new release e-mails for Radical Face.
Sorry, there was an error with your request.
Please wait...

Top Albums by Radical Face



All music downloads by Radical Face
Sort by:
Bestselling
1-10 of 51
Song Title Album Prime  
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

Videos


Image of Radical Face
Provided by the artist or their representative

Latest Tweet

RadicalFace

 Just reached 70,000 Trackers on Bandsintown... Track us for local concert alerts! http://t.co/Cd1lWsNNev


Biography

Ben Cooper is a teller of stories, although the one that interests him least seems to be his own.

“I can’t write about myself — I can’t be sympathetic,” says the man known by his musical appellation RADICAL FACE. “But you always reveal yourself in everything you do, sometimes very brazenly and sometimes very subtly. Those events, once you strip everything back to the motivation and sentiment, define us. They’re part of the mythologies we create for ourselves.”

Radical Face brings that allegorical approach to the fanciful album trilogy he launched in 2011 with the release of The Family Tree: ... Read more

Ben Cooper is a teller of stories, although the one that interests him least seems to be his own.

“I can’t write about myself — I can’t be sympathetic,” says the man known by his musical appellation RADICAL FACE. “But you always reveal yourself in everything you do, sometimes very brazenly and sometimes very subtly. Those events, once you strip everything back to the motivation and sentiment, define us. They’re part of the mythologies we create for ourselves.”

Radical Face brings that allegorical approach to the fanciful album trilogy he launched in 2011 with the release of The Family Tree: The Roots, a chronicle revolving around a fictitious 19th-century family (the Northcotes) whose protagonists, unwittingly or not, chart a course for future generations. Radical Face’s second installment of the series, The Family Tree: The Branches, is due October 22 via Nettwerk Records.

The project embodies Radical Face’s fascination with big story arcs, history and genealogy — the characters in his sometimes-dark tales are drawn from research, personal experience and his own imagination. “It’s interesting to me how certain decisions, or certain events, influence everything forever,” he says. “I like to trace all the lines.”

Rather than the narrative storytelling style used in The Roots, the meticulously crafted indie-folk songs on The Family Tree: The Branches represent letters written by members of the family’s next generation, circa 1860 to 1910. The songs link those descendants to their heirs by way of certain recurring musical phrases or melody lines from the first album. In addition, the albums have the quality of true period pieces, Radical Face having used only the instruments that would have been available at the time to make the music.

Cooper’s own story could be the stuff of legend itself. As a teenager in Jacksonville, Fla., he had his heart set on being a professional skateboarder, but a serious back injury scotched that. He had played in rock bands but largely disdained band politics, so, inspired by books such as “East of Eden,” “One Hundred Years of Solitude” and the works of authors such as Cormac McCarthy, he embarked on writing a novel.

He lost his entire manuscript in a computer crash.

“So I decided to try it in record form,” he says.

Radical Face’s penchant for otherworldly narratives was revealed on his 2007 release Ghost, a concept album based on the notion that houses retain memories of what transpired inside them. His Family Tree series was teased with a 2010 EP, “Touch the Sky,” which included the song “Welcome Home,” which eventually was used in a worldwide Nikon advertising campaign.

The characters in The Family Tree are often composites or even abstractions — “Sometimes I think of them as symbols,” Radical Face says — but what these fathers and mothers and sisters and brothers feel is universal: the passion of love, the grief of death, the pressures of family, the allure of home, the sorrow of regrets, the tug of dreams.

“It’s a lot more like mythology than straight history,” he says. “I like to take ideas in broad strokes and write about them from one person’s point of view. Like war, which is completely unfathomable until you read about it from one person’s perspective. Thousands and thousands of people clashing — that’s hard to get your mind around. But to read a diary entry of one guy from a small platoon who was third in line, then you can begin to understand.”

The intimate quality of Radical Face’s music owes in part to his creative process. The Family Tree: The Roots was recorded in a tool shed behind his mother’s house, and Cooper sequestered himself similarly in the painstaking task of making the follow-up.

“I try to be as closed-off as possible,” he says. “I try not to get self-conscious about it — to let the idea dictate where the music goes and not be scared of it. In the end, you’re just making up the audience anyway; you’re hypothesizing about what they would want. Because of the way I work, I feel like I’m in a little bubble.”

Resolutely a do-it-yourselfer, Radical Face creates all the videos and album artwork for his music as well. “I guess I’m pretty selfish with it,” he acknowledges, “but I try not to make bad decisions.”

Although he might admit, when it comes to storytelling, bad decisions are often the beginnings of the best tales.

“It’s like Joseph Campbell says,” Radical Face says, “we are all living the same mythologies over and over again.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Ben Cooper is a teller of stories, although the one that interests him least seems to be his own.

“I can’t write about myself — I can’t be sympathetic,” says the man known by his musical appellation RADICAL FACE. “But you always reveal yourself in everything you do, sometimes very brazenly and sometimes very subtly. Those events, once you strip everything back to the motivation and sentiment, define us. They’re part of the mythologies we create for ourselves.”

Radical Face brings that allegorical approach to the fanciful album trilogy he launched in 2011 with the release of The Family Tree: The Roots, a chronicle revolving around a fictitious 19th-century family (the Northcotes) whose protagonists, unwittingly or not, chart a course for future generations. Radical Face’s second installment of the series, The Family Tree: The Branches, is due October 22 via Nettwerk Records.

The project embodies Radical Face’s fascination with big story arcs, history and genealogy — the characters in his sometimes-dark tales are drawn from research, personal experience and his own imagination. “It’s interesting to me how certain decisions, or certain events, influence everything forever,” he says. “I like to trace all the lines.”

Rather than the narrative storytelling style used in The Roots, the meticulously crafted indie-folk songs on The Family Tree: The Branches represent letters written by members of the family’s next generation, circa 1860 to 1910. The songs link those descendants to their heirs by way of certain recurring musical phrases or melody lines from the first album. In addition, the albums have the quality of true period pieces, Radical Face having used only the instruments that would have been available at the time to make the music.

Cooper’s own story could be the stuff of legend itself. As a teenager in Jacksonville, Fla., he had his heart set on being a professional skateboarder, but a serious back injury scotched that. He had played in rock bands but largely disdained band politics, so, inspired by books such as “East of Eden,” “One Hundred Years of Solitude” and the works of authors such as Cormac McCarthy, he embarked on writing a novel.

He lost his entire manuscript in a computer crash.

“So I decided to try it in record form,” he says.

Radical Face’s penchant for otherworldly narratives was revealed on his 2007 release Ghost, a concept album based on the notion that houses retain memories of what transpired inside them. His Family Tree series was teased with a 2010 EP, “Touch the Sky,” which included the song “Welcome Home,” which eventually was used in a worldwide Nikon advertising campaign.

The characters in The Family Tree are often composites or even abstractions — “Sometimes I think of them as symbols,” Radical Face says — but what these fathers and mothers and sisters and brothers feel is universal: the passion of love, the grief of death, the pressures of family, the allure of home, the sorrow of regrets, the tug of dreams.

“It’s a lot more like mythology than straight history,” he says. “I like to take ideas in broad strokes and write about them from one person’s point of view. Like war, which is completely unfathomable until you read about it from one person’s perspective. Thousands and thousands of people clashing — that’s hard to get your mind around. But to read a diary entry of one guy from a small platoon who was third in line, then you can begin to understand.”

The intimate quality of Radical Face’s music owes in part to his creative process. The Family Tree: The Roots was recorded in a tool shed behind his mother’s house, and Cooper sequestered himself similarly in the painstaking task of making the follow-up.

“I try to be as closed-off as possible,” he says. “I try not to get self-conscious about it — to let the idea dictate where the music goes and not be scared of it. In the end, you’re just making up the audience anyway; you’re hypothesizing about what they would want. Because of the way I work, I feel like I’m in a little bubble.”

Resolutely a do-it-yourselfer, Radical Face creates all the videos and album artwork for his music as well. “I guess I’m pretty selfish with it,” he acknowledges, “but I try not to make bad decisions.”

Although he might admit, when it comes to storytelling, bad decisions are often the beginnings of the best tales.

“It’s like Joseph Campbell says,” Radical Face says, “we are all living the same mythologies over and over again.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Ben Cooper is a teller of stories, although the one that interests him least seems to be his own.

“I can’t write about myself — I can’t be sympathetic,” says the man known by his musical appellation RADICAL FACE. “But you always reveal yourself in everything you do, sometimes very brazenly and sometimes very subtly. Those events, once you strip everything back to the motivation and sentiment, define us. They’re part of the mythologies we create for ourselves.”

Radical Face brings that allegorical approach to the fanciful album trilogy he launched in 2011 with the release of The Family Tree: The Roots, a chronicle revolving around a fictitious 19th-century family (the Northcotes) whose protagonists, unwittingly or not, chart a course for future generations. Radical Face’s second installment of the series, The Family Tree: The Branches, is due October 22 via Nettwerk Records.

The project embodies Radical Face’s fascination with big story arcs, history and genealogy — the characters in his sometimes-dark tales are drawn from research, personal experience and his own imagination. “It’s interesting to me how certain decisions, or certain events, influence everything forever,” he says. “I like to trace all the lines.”

Rather than the narrative storytelling style used in The Roots, the meticulously crafted indie-folk songs on The Family Tree: The Branches represent letters written by members of the family’s next generation, circa 1860 to 1910. The songs link those descendants to their heirs by way of certain recurring musical phrases or melody lines from the first album. In addition, the albums have the quality of true period pieces, Radical Face having used only the instruments that would have been available at the time to make the music.

Cooper’s own story could be the stuff of legend itself. As a teenager in Jacksonville, Fla., he had his heart set on being a professional skateboarder, but a serious back injury scotched that. He had played in rock bands but largely disdained band politics, so, inspired by books such as “East of Eden,” “One Hundred Years of Solitude” and the works of authors such as Cormac McCarthy, he embarked on writing a novel.

He lost his entire manuscript in a computer crash.

“So I decided to try it in record form,” he says.

Radical Face’s penchant for otherworldly narratives was revealed on his 2007 release Ghost, a concept album based on the notion that houses retain memories of what transpired inside them. His Family Tree series was teased with a 2010 EP, “Touch the Sky,” which included the song “Welcome Home,” which eventually was used in a worldwide Nikon advertising campaign.

The characters in The Family Tree are often composites or even abstractions — “Sometimes I think of them as symbols,” Radical Face says — but what these fathers and mothers and sisters and brothers feel is universal: the passion of love, the grief of death, the pressures of family, the allure of home, the sorrow of regrets, the tug of dreams.

“It’s a lot more like mythology than straight history,” he says. “I like to take ideas in broad strokes and write about them from one person’s point of view. Like war, which is completely unfathomable until you read about it from one person’s perspective. Thousands and thousands of people clashing — that’s hard to get your mind around. But to read a diary entry of one guy from a small platoon who was third in line, then you can begin to understand.”

The intimate quality of Radical Face’s music owes in part to his creative process. The Family Tree: The Roots was recorded in a tool shed behind his mother’s house, and Cooper sequestered himself similarly in the painstaking task of making the follow-up.

“I try to be as closed-off as possible,” he says. “I try not to get self-conscious about it — to let the idea dictate where the music goes and not be scared of it. In the end, you’re just making up the audience anyway; you’re hypothesizing about what they would want. Because of the way I work, I feel like I’m in a little bubble.”

Resolutely a do-it-yourselfer, Radical Face creates all the videos and album artwork for his music as well. “I guess I’m pretty selfish with it,” he acknowledges, “but I try not to make bad decisions.”

Although he might admit, when it comes to storytelling, bad decisions are often the beginnings of the best tales.

“It’s like Joseph Campbell says,” Radical Face says, “we are all living the same mythologies over and over again.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Improve This Page

If you’re the artist, you can update your biography, photos, videos, and more at Artist Central.

Get started at Artist Central

Feedback

Check out our Artist Stores FAQ
Send us feedback about this page