Automotive Deals HPCC Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it Crown the Empire Fire TV Stick Happy Belly Coffee Handmade school supplies Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer TarantinoCollection TarantinoCollection TarantinoCollection  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Introducing new colors All-New Kindle Oasis Segway miniPro

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on December 30, 2014
This is a great read summarizing how to truly put kids first in education. Will America step up? We will see.....
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on September 17, 2014
Radical has some interesting ideas and comments, but it is basically a very dishonest book. It is essentially a love letter from Michelle Rhee to herself. She constantly makes claims without a shred of evidence to back them up. It starts with the title. She calls herself a radical. It is difficult to believe that anyone else who has been involved in education over the past decade would call an individual who supports massive testing regimes, charter schools, vouchers and the end of unions a radical. Even her positive ideas, such as rewarding "good"--who decides and how?--teachers with decent salaries are undermined by internal inconsistencies. Does she really believe that "good" doctors in the DC area make no more than 140K a year?
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on September 1, 2014
Don't buy this woman's book or crap! She is a joke in American public education with no real credentials other than a cheating scandal in Washington DC. Add to that her pathetic and scandalous husband. What you've got here is a corporate crony trying to make money off of people who haven't researched who she really is.
11 comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 3, 2014
I had to read this for a class. I suggest you not waste your time.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 2, 2014
But she doesn't have a whole lot to say. Interesting story about her rise to national fame. Not a whole lot of data to prove that she is on to something. Other than she believes in it and she is a persuasive and charismatic leader.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 28, 2014
This book should be retitled: Michelle Rhee: The Autobiography. The book traces Michelle's rise from a scrappy youth to a hard edge executive of StudentsFirst. Along the way she provides humorous anecdotes and praises those who have helped her along the way. It's all good stuff but that's an autobiography not a book about putting students first. I assume she wrote this book from the angle of "let me tell my story and people will see how the system works without being preachy" but she doesn't provide to much details and raises as many questions on school reform as she answers.

The most notably lack of info comes from the funding for her pay for performance program. To not mention who the contributors were that made this possible but Rhee notes where her husband proposed makes this an autobiography not a book about school reform. That's a glaring omission.

Other questions dealt mostly with lack of detail on curriculum beyond math and reading. For example:
By seventh grade my school had team teaching with individual teachers responsible for Reading, English, and Math - we also had History, Foreign Language, and Science. How does pay for performance work for teachers who's classes aren't captured in nationwide testing? What does the curriculum look like and how is the class day divided between these subject areas? What about high school teachers?

For a self-proclaimed data wonk so didn't see to grasp that test score fluctuations from one year to another could be a statistical anomaly so I was confused as to why a bonus would be paid off a one year result vs. multi-year trending. What if a teacher's students perform really well in their final year before retirement raising the teachers pension base salary then the same class takes a dive the following year? There's bad teachers out there - which teachers do you think are more likely to game the system and teach to a test for a potential bonus?

I pulled back and wondered if we even have a problem with education in America? I looked at the OECD/PISA rankings and three of the Top Ten aren't even countries. One is a city/state. Two are quasi city/states. Only two are "real" countries comparable to the US: South Korea and Japan...which are two countries education models I would never want to see copied in the US. After those Top Ten it's not a huge drop between the major European countries to the US but all of those countries do not have the income inequality that we have in the US. So is the real issue that we have more poor people taking the test than Germany? Is this a chicken and egg debate that: education lifts the poor, poor struggle with education? How do you break the cycle? Michelle Rhee states with great teachers and to attract them you need to pay them more...that makes sense but her decision to use "charities" to fund the gap between the higher costs and tax revenue should be a red flag.

So to solve a problem we may or may not have America's wealthiest citizens have decided to lend assistance...

Let me see if I understand this correctly...the family of one of the most despicable companies in America, Walmart, refuses to pay its employees a living wage, thus limiting their upward mobility and lowering their tax base to fund adequately schools in their home communities, and in some cases leads to a single parent to get a second job which prevents the parent from being home with the child to assist with homework, etc., has decided to create a personal charity, that when they make a contribution helps to lower their effective tax rate to less than mine, and then use this charity to "contribute" to local politicians so that schools teach children, who aren't their's, what they think should be learned, without any input from local citizens or in some cases a notification of the changes that will be coming. Is that correct?

So Walmart heirs want us to reach other industrial nations' standards of education but when it comes to matching similar standards for worker's rights, wage equality, job security, and time off, etc. they'll preach "free-market" and that they are applying the same "free-market" principles to education in America. Since when has "free-market" meant the buy-off of politicians to write the rules of the economy in your favor and send tax dollars to private companies?...oh right since the early 1980s. And how was that turned out for the American worker? So how do you think "free-market" education will turn out for the American student?
11 comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 29, 2014
Michelle Rhee walks us through her journey in becoming an avid education reformer. Whether you agree with her views or not, you can be assured of her passion and zeal for children and the education system in America. She is completely devoted to reforming a broken system and this book shares how she is going about the repairs. It is enjoyable and inspiring.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 29, 2014
I totally agree with Ms. Rhee's assessment of Public Education, and mostly agree with her recommendations of action for change. However, this book is more autobiographical (and self-serving) than I expected, and so the "OK" rating. Read the last two chapters; skip the rest!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on May 28, 2014
Another attempt by Rhee to sustain her image as the tough educational reformer! Truth is she is a TFA recruit without a teaching license who somehow weaseled her way into DC schools. She is making a fortune off of the backs of teachers, children and is nothing more than a glorified lobbyist. Saw her book on clearance at B&N for $1.99!!!
11 comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on May 25, 2014
At first, the book feels like your inspirational "I overcame the odds" story of an educator fighting a dirty system, but at the end feels like a resume.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.