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Radical Hospitality: Benedict's Way of Love Paperback – May 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 233 pages
  • Publisher: Paraclete Press (May 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557254419
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557254412
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 5.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,497,288 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"All guests who present themselves are to be welcomed as Christ." So says the famous Rule of St. Benedict, written more than 1,500 years ago and still the operative standard for all Benedictine monasteries. This simple guide shows readers that hospitality is not reserved for the monastery only, but is an ideal for all Christians who wish to connect closely with one another. Homan, a Benedictine monk in Oxford, Mich., draws stories from monastery life, while Pratt, a freelance writer and retreat leader, transposes them nicely for the reader. They discuss some of the challenges of hospitality: guests sometimes have different values than their hosts; they can intrude upon the routines of daily life; they require intimate companionship when hosts might rather be alone. There is an element of surrender to true hospitality, of opening the heart to strangers as well as friends. "Forget about turned-down sheets, mints on the pillow and towel-warmers," say the authors. "Monastic hospitality creates sacred space where the guest is free to be alone, to enter silence, to pray and rest." At the heart of monastic hospitality is the discipline of listening, of allowing a guest to feel safe and loved. The book is more descriptive than prescriptive; it is not a how-to guide listing 10 steps to cultivate "deep listening" or the seven secrets of the well-laid table. It is instead a heartfelt sharing of stories, a welcome mat to enter into the spiritual discipline of hospitality.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

. . . inspiring guide to developing an essential spiritual trait. This is no fluff piece. . . -- Susan Dunman, CBA Marketplace, September 2002

. . .outlines the spiritual principles of hospitality at the core of the monastic, Benedictine way of life. -- Allison Askins, The State

Radical Hospitality is not something people do, but rather something people become. -- Todd Weddle, St. Joseph News-Press

. . .the authors explore the spiritual and human connotations of the act of welcoming others. -- Body and Soul, November/December 2002

Benedict's vision of hospitality was so deep and beautiful. -- The Oakland Press, October 16, 2002

Comforting and challenging, their book takes us deep within the heart of Benedictine spirituality. -- Religion News Service, October 2002

Offers a remedy to fear and suspicion. -- Interpreter, November/December 2002

Offers indispensable wisdom, thoughtful reflection and practical steps. -- Abbey Blessings, Fall 2002 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The book is very realistic, helpful and enjoyable.
Robert Brantsch gloria Luthrn
Either way this book causes the individual to seriously challenge and examine they way we all live our lives as hospitable people.
Elise Ainsworth Bryson
Got through it in a few hours after which I immediately read it again.
Jonathan Wes Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Rev. Joe on October 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
There's a danger in thinking this book is about being nice or anxious to entertain guests. There is no normal sense of the word hospitality by which one can identify the message of Radical Hospitality. It is clear-headed, wildly fun to read with unexpected sorts of stories about real people. Personally, I mistrust rave reviews. Can any book be so worthwhile that it merits no criticism? I found nothing to dislike in this vision of a kinder world. A monk who writes with a pretty woman can't be all bad.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Literary Bug on December 5, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I picked up Radical Hospiality because of a sermon I heard in Boston awhile ago while visiting a friend from college. I did not catch the name of the author, authors as it turns out, but I was sure the minister, a woman, was quoting from a book. When I did a internet search it turned out that the phrase Radical Hospitality is used by religious and social groups from churches to conventions, all around the world. What I amazed by is that so few of the people, like the minister, name where they got their quotes or who they are quoting. This is a very fine book. It borders on brilliant actually and I am not the sort to use such a word casually. Why would anyone not want to give these authors the credit they deserve? The book, Radical Hospitality is challenging in a gentle way. I never once felt like the writers were shoving some agenda down my throat. There is just this level of telling their own experience and stories that any half-brain dead person could tell is from their hearts. Don't get me wrong. It is not a personal experience kind of book and it is not a book for anyone who like fluff instead of substance. But, if you are looking for a book about what has gone wrong in how we relate to one another, this is it. And if you love it too, be sure you tell people who you're quoting!
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By David G. Robinson on February 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
What a delight to read "Radical Hospitality", written by a monk and a mom. Both worlds, that of the monastery and the family home, are primary places of hospitality. Lonni & Daniel weave their lives, stories and faith together into a durable and beautiful welcome rug, inviting all who dare step this way into a life of "radical hospitality". The title word "radical" may turn some away from this book due to connotations of rebellion and anarchy. Don't let it. "Radical" simply means "having to do with the root, the radix". Benedictine hospitality is truly radical, returning us to our roots, our true heart home in God the God who welcomes us as we are, where we are, who we are. Hospitality begins at home with God, and at home where we live, eat, sleep and love on a daily basis with others. Radical hospitality is the true balm to heal the wounds of nations, and bring peace. But will we live this way? For another book that explores Benedictine hospitality in the home, look into THE BUSY FAMILY'S GUIDE TO SPIRITUALITY (Crossroad, 2009). The Busy Family's Guide to Spirituality: Practical Lessons for Modern Living From the Monastic Tradition
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By C. Kim on June 4, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read all the positive reviews and looked forward to reading "Radical Hospitality." I had hoped that this would be a book addressing Benedictine hospitality in a style similar to Father Timothy Gallagher's excellent guides to Ignatian spirituality. Based on the book's description and reviews, I expected "Radical Hospitality" to explain how Benedictine rule can be applied practically to one's own life to better develop the virtue of hospitality. It is not. The book's conversational, rambling style is easy enough to read, but I found it lacking in the kind of substance that inspires reflection and action. Anecdotes, generalizations, and flowery writing abound. Clarity of purpose does not.

As a Catholic Christian, the statement that the Eucharist has such power because "it is founded in our food experience" and "food is powerful" finally prompted me to give up on "Radical Hospitality." The Eucharist is powerful because it is Jesus Christ.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gail Bruce on September 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I gave away several copies of Benedict's Way, the last book from Homan and Pratt. I was very excited about this book and I'm not disappointed in the authors at all. It can't be an easy thing for two people, obviously such different people, to write in a single voice but they do and there is something about their single voice that is stronger than the dual voices they had in Benedicts Way. This is not exactly a "practical" book, it is about becoming rather than how to do something. The authors are upfront about that so if you are looking for a how-to guide you'll be disappointed. I liked their redefining of hospitality, taking it beyond our narrow understanding of the word. The 9/11 link is present in the book but it isn't something dripping from every line, it is really not a 9/11 book even though it was mentioned somewhere as one of the best books written on 9/11. I hope we hear a lot more from this writing pair. A couple observations. I had a difficult time getting used to the combined voice of a monk and a woman. Not sure why it bothered me at first but it did. By the second chapter I realized that my discomfort was gone. I expected something along the lines of Benedicts Way, and this is a different book. I also had to get past my expectation. However, it is a great read, very moving and profound. The authors do things with words that I've never read before. I like it very much and hope there are more coming.
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