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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Two Dollar Radio (May 15, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 098324717X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0983247173
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,052,218 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Anne-Marie Kinney: Anne-Marie Kinney has been published in Black Clock, Indiana Review, and Keyhole, and performed at L.A.’s Word Theatre. Radio Iris is her first novel.

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Customer Reviews

It was compelling in the beginning but then seemed to just go on and on to a strange ending that I just didn't get.
Just A. Girl
This was probably intentional as well, but the lack of plot-line and pace didn't work for me, nor did the omniscient narrator.
The Paperback Pursuer
Maybe it is intended to make the reader go back and question the character's sanity, but as a ending, it is terrible.
Jeff G. Brock

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ronald H. Raybin on September 3, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While I was utterly captivated by this book and its mysterious depths, if, like my wife (who gave it the raspberries), you want clear resolution and harbor little tolerance for ambiguity and characters at sea, you probably won't find this as creepily engaging as I did. "Radio Iris" is way more than a well-written tale about a girl working in a very strange office with weirdness that grows like kudzu. It's about anomie and entropy. It's about desperation and lack of connection. It has roots in Kafka, Camus' "The Stranger," overtones of Conrad Aiken's shudder-inducing short story "Silent Snow, Secret Snow," and even, at the end, a dark touch of Lewis Carroll. Yet it's quite originally itself and renders its key characters as real people and not authorial contrivances. I can't wait for Anne-Marie Kinney's second book. But "Radio Iris" creates an awfully high bar (if you like what I liked about it) for what's next out of the gate.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By James P. Carney on July 12, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed reading this well written, mystery/suspense story. The use of first person viewpoint, the unreliable narrator, and the pacing of the story reminds me of The Egyptologist by Arthur Phillips. From the beginning it's obvious that Iris is trying very hard not to think about something from her past, but the event, how she was involved, and why it affects her as it does, is revealed so gradually, that the reader gets to enjoy Iris's own awakening to the significance of the event. Like Iris, I also work in a small office, that has days of almost complete silence, absent co-workers and absent managers. Sometimes work really is like living in the Twilight Zone. BTDTGTTS.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Burrell on April 14, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of the VERY few books I actually splurged and bought (I usually go free or cheap, out of necessity) and really did not like it. I finished and thought what was that!?!
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By Just A. Girl on July 11, 2013
Format: Paperback
I don't know quite to make of this book. It was compelling in the beginning but then seemed to just go on and on to a strange ending that I just didn't get. I bought it because someone suggested it after I reviewed Before I Go To SLeep which I loved.
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Format: Paperback
Review:

I actually don't know how I feel about Radio Iris. I loved Anne-Marie Kinney's word-craft, her descriptions were eloquent and full of life; I only wish that Iris's character had held the same skin-prickling spark. I enjoy words - how they look, how they sound, how they come together to create, or recreate, a scene or feeling, etcetera - and Kinney's writing style is the quintessence of sensory. For example: "...The sun, a runny yolk in the sky, dripping onto red dirt, little by little until there is nothing left of it, the sky extinguished as the last drop hits..." and "...She feels his eyes searching, imagines them like small rays of light trawling across her skin...". I could see and feel every vivid detail while I read, unfortunately these beautiful phrases seemed to circle around a plot-less gray drain. Iris and her brother Neil are very different from the characters I usually read about. Each conversation seemed to lead them nowhere, a sense of utter alienation and unconcern surrounding every action. Iris was a very sundry character, she didn't seem to fit in anywhere, (which I guess was the point), her interactions were boring, even for her. Socially awkward didn't even begin to cover her personality. I went though at least half the 209 page book thinking that maybe Iris had autism or another social disorder. I was not invested in any of the characters because they just "existed" - there was no real story to follow. This was probably intentional as well, but the lack of plot-line and pace didn't work for me, nor did the omniscient narrator. I believe that the author's style was quite unique - poetic, surreal and sometimes unsettling, however, I couldn't help but want something more from such an obviously talented writer.
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