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Product Details

  • Series: Smithsonian Institution
  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Radio Spirits (September 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1570191670
  • ISBN-13: 978-1570191671
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 5.7 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,121,145 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Neal Reynolds VINE VOICE on August 3, 2001
Format: Audio CD
No science fiction unless you count Escape's great adaptation of "Country of the Blind". And only one detective type which classifies as mystery because of the mysterious "Fatima". Still, a great collection. Top of the heap is the "Suspense" classic, "The Hitchhiker" with the great Orson Wells at his greatest. "Escape" is represented as mentioned above with "Country of the Blind", a H. G. Wells story, spotlighting the terrific use of sound effects and music in telling the story. Then, there's not one, but two examples of the great Arch Oboler. First, there's "Cat Wife" on "Everyman's Theater", an admittedly preposterous supernatural story, but made one of the most entertaining entries here because of the Oboler genius of use of the voices. The "Lights Out" episode, also featuring Oboler's talent, was the lesser of the two, but quite interesting because of the dramatic acting by singer Dinah Shore and tough voiced Gloria Blondell. "The Whistler" and "Inner Sanctum" were two of the best loved mystery series, and the theme music of the former, and use of the organ in the latter definitely are masterful. But the episode which I found most interesting and surprising personally was the story, "Killer, Come Back to Me" on Molle Mystery Theater, a gangster story by a fledgling author by the name of Ray Bradbury while he was still writing for the detective pulps, before he found himself in the horror and science fiction genres which made him famous. I am sure that while many Bradbury stories were dramatized on radio, this was undoubtedly the first. The classic "Dr. Jekyll and Mr.Read more ›
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Michael on June 17, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Today we are truly the inheritors of mass media but think back upon a time when all the american public had in their homes was a radio. Movies were the medium you had to go out to see but radio was in your homes. Comedy flourished,Westerns brought excitement but Mysteries dominated the medium as no other had before it. The twelve shows represented in this collection SUSPENSE, ESCAPE, THE WHISTLER, LIGHTS OUT, MURDER BY EXPERTS, MOLLE MYSTERY THEATRE,EVERYMAN'S THEATRE, INNER SANCTUM,THE MYSTERIOUS TRAVELER,THE CLOCK, THE WEIRD CIRCLE & TALES OF FATIMA. With the exception of the final title all of these shows are good examples of a self contained story which if successful would raise the hackles on the back of your neck. TALES OF FATIMA on the other hand seems to belong more in a collection of gentleman dectives. It has the estimable Basil Rathbone playing himself as an actor who sleuths between performances. 3 prime examples of the power of dramatic radio presented here are H.G. Wells' The Country of The Blind presented on ESCAPE starring Edmond O'Brien, The Eager Pigeon on THE WHISTLER starring Jack Webb and the final gem of The Hitchhiker starring Orson Welles presented on the greatest mystery anthology of them all SUSPENSE. All of these shows have been remastered to the point where you would honestly think they were recorded yesterday. So turn your light's down and prepare to enter the mind's eye.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By George R Dekle on February 28, 2001
Format: Audio CD
The realm of mystery and suspense must lie somewhere between the detective story and science fiction. The example shows chosen from "Escape", "Everyman's Theater", "Suspense", "The Mysterious Traveler", and "The Wierd Circle" would have been just as much at home in the Smithsonian science fiction collection, while the stories from "The Molle Mystery Theatre", "Murder by Experts", "Tales of Fatima", and "The Whistler" would have fitted quite nicely into the Smithsonian detectives collection.
Several of the individual episodes were classics: H.G. Wells' "The Country of the Blind" ("Escape"), Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde" ("The Wierd Circle"), and Orson Welles' "The Hitchhiker" ("Suspense"). Radio drama just doesn't get any better than these episodes. "Suspense" has to have been the greatest radio drama series of all time, but from what I've seen, "Escape" wasn't far behind in quality.
"Cat Wife" ("Everyman's Theater"), "The Man the Insects Hated" ("The Mysterious Traveler"), "Killer Come Back to Me" ("The Molle Mystery Theatre"), and "The Eager Pigeon" ("The Whistler") were forgettable.
Two of my favorite old time radio detectives were included: Basil Rathbone played himself in "Tales of Fatima", but the persona he adopted was strongly influenced by the many years he spent portraying Sherlock Holmes. Jack Webb played an anti-hero in "The Whistler", but Webb's bad guy was a sort of a tarnished Joe Friday. Webb seems incapable of having played anything other than a jaded tough-guy. The three series characters he played (Jeff Regan, Pat Novak, and Joe Friday) were all had boiled, hard fisted heroes.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Flame_926 on September 26, 2004
Format: Audio Cassette
I thought that this collection of stories were going to be "mysteries," something more along the lines of detectives, crimes, and sleuthing. What it turned out to be was a collection of good radio dramas that were more accounts of "strange happenings" and "thrillers." The audio quality was good and the stories were well done, I just think that the CD's were a bit misleading in their titles.
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