Raditude (Amazon MP3 Exclusive Version)

November 3, 2009 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:29
30
2
3:08
30
3
3:15
30
4
4:22
30
5
3:15
30
6
3:41
30
7
3:43
30
8
3:18
30
9
2:39
30
10
3:48
30
11
3:10

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Product Details

  • Label: DGC/Interscope
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 37:48
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002U5535K
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (114 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #16,118 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

If we know the answer to that question like Rivers knows it, Raditude is a great album, and we will be listening to it for a long long time...
Alex
It is one of their best efforts in a solid career that began with their 1994 debut, the classic "Blue Album" with includes the hit song "Buddy Holly."
Donald Capone
Well so much for the glimmer of hope that might've been found in the Red Album..... I didn't think Weezer could really sink lower than Make Believe.
ClydeNut

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 59 people found the following review helpful By rocket21 on November 5, 2009
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
The single "Pork and Beans" from their previous album, Red, was written as a response to a meeting Rivers Cuomo had with the record company, in which pressure was applied on making a more commercial sound. He responds to these requests (such as working with trendy musicians to top the charts) by saying, "Imma do the things that I wanna do / I ain't got a thing to prove to you"

Unfortunately, it appears this resistance has worn away. Only three of the ten tracks were written soley by the band. The rest were co-written by folks such as Jermaine Dupre, Dr. Luke, Butch Walker, and the All American Rejects. Depending upon whether or not one considers drummer Josh Freese part of the band, six of the ten tracks feature outside musicians.

Lead single and first track "(If You're Wondering If I Want You To) I Want You To" is quintessential Weezer - an upbeat, accoustic guitar driven rock song with quirky lyrics. After that, though, the album in my opinion starts a free fall, with quite a few generic, seemingly soulless over-produced pop songs. Two late-album tracks try to maintain some artistic integrity with the far east influenced Love Is The Answer and Beach Boys inspired Don't Want To Let You Go.

Having heard many shelved Cuomo demos over the years, it's always unfortunate to hear releases that feature bland songs. There are probably three albums worth of demos that are, in my opinion, vastly superior to a majority of the material released on the last two Weezer releases.

Instead, over-produced generic pop songs seem to be the norm.
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66 of 76 people found the following review helpful By Meecrofilm on November 3, 2009
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
First, if you don't think Weezer is being tongue-in-cheek in naming an album "Raditude," you'll probably be in for a disappointment, as anyone who approaches this album with a straight face, so to speak, won't "get it" at all. Anybody who didn't get that the "boo-yah" in the song Everybody Get Dangerous (off the Red Album) was SUPPOSED to sound really feeble and cheesy because the characters in the song were just that (feeble and cheesy), won't get the songs on Raditude. Hey, song titles like "I'm Your Daddy" and "Girl Got Hot" are exactly what they suggest. Cheesy. Did I mention they're also extremely catchy?

Raditude sounds like an album based around Weezer's earlier hit song Beverly Hills, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, because A) that song is really catchy, and B) we finally get album continuity. That song had no business being on Make Believe, and, though full of good songs, The Red Album doesn't really feel like an ALBUM. Raditude feels like a complete album though--almost a modern update of the Green Album. Just like the Green Album, Raditude starts off with the best song on the album, 'I Want You To.' I can already tell this song will be in my rotation for a long time. The whole first half of the album is some of the most listen-able, catchiest music Weezer has ever written.

Unfortunately, the album stumbles a bit in the latter half. "Love Is The Answer" doesn't really do it for me, and, even though it's not a serious song, I really don't care for "In the Mall" either. Small stumbles aside, Raditude is an album worthy of being added to your Weezer collection. Die hard fans who think that pre-Green Album Weezer is the only true Weezer and everything else is trash will NOT like this album. It's very possible to like both though.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A. Estes on November 3, 2009
Format: Audio CD
If Weezer have spent the past decade working their hardest to pump out as many albums and hits as possible, than "Raditude," the band's seventh studio offering, is the after-party. True to typical Weezer fashion, it's a polarizing album that will no doubt leave the band's fanbase scratching their heads while simultaneously spawning several radio hits.

While the quality and consistency of the album may not have you jumping for joy like the dog that graces the album cover, there is certainly something here for everyone. Longtime fans will appreciate the somewhat true-to-form "(If You're Wondering If I Want You To) I Want You To" and "Put Me Back Together." The latter, co-written by Tyson Ritter and Nick Wheeler of pop-punk outfit The All-American Rejects is the same kind of heart-on-the-sleeve rocker that made the band such a cult success way back when.

Elsewhere, though, the band takes twists and turns never heard before. Collaborating with Lil' Wayne for "Can't Stop Partying" is an idea that sounds terrible on paper but surprisingly makes for one of the most inspired moments on the album. While on the surface it comes off as a synth-laden party anthem, what is revealed upon closer inspection is a hint of irony that makes the song seem, well, sad.

Likewise, the sleaze-rock of "The Girl Got Hot" and the good-time feel of "I'm Your Daddy" seem superficial on the surface until Rivers reveals himself to be slyly mocking and somewhat paying tribute to sounds and styles not normally embraced. Afterall, this is the man who once confessed his love of nu-metallers Drowning Pool and Limp Bizkit and who wrote a song for Crazy Town.
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