The Rainbow and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $11.00
  • Save: $1.33 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Rainbow (Modern Library 100 Best Novels) Paperback – February 12, 2002


See all 161 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, February 12, 2002
$9.67
$4.00 $0.01
Unknown Binding, Import
"Please retry"

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Frequently Bought Together

The Rainbow (Modern Library 100 Best Novels) + Women in Love + To the Lighthouse
Price for all three: $23.26

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Rosie Effect
Bill Gates calls it "profound" -- check out Graeme Simsion's sequel to best seller "The Rosie Project," available now. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Modern Library 100 Best Novels
  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Modern Library (February 12, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375759654
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375759659
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 1.1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #927,621 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“[Lawrence] had that quality of genius which sucks out of ordinary experience essences strange or unknown to men.” —Anaïs Nin

Book Description

D. H. Lawrence started 'The Sisters' in 1913, wrote four different versions and claimed to have discarded 'quite a thousand pages' before completing The Rainbow in 1915. Mark Kinkead-Weekes gives the composition history and collates the surviving states of the text to assess the damage done to Lawrence's great novel. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Only in a very vague sense does the novel tell a story at all.
Robert Moore
They do manage to have children, one of whom is Ursula, who will return as a mature woman in Lawrence's sequel, WOMEN IN LOVE.
Martin Asiner
Lawrence writes with some of the most beautifully lyrical and lush wording.
EpicFehlReader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

82 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 19, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The importance of THE RAINBOW in the development of the English novel should not be underestimated. As a reader, I have to confess that this is not one of my favorite books; just as D. H. Lawrence is on the whole a writer I respect more than enjoy. But any serious student of the English novel has to acknowledge the importance of his novels. Even more than in his great classic novel SONS AND LOVERS, Lawrence in his pair of novels THE RAINBOW and WOMEN IN LOVE (originally conceived as a single novel, but split apart upon rewrites) helped rewrite the rules of what was possible in the novel.

There are four significant ways in which this novel (and its successor) represents something entirely new. First, Lawrence in THE RAINBOW largely dispenses with plot as the major structural device. Only in a very vague sense does the novel tell a story at all. It records the various attempts by members of three generations of the Brangwen family to achieve selfhood, but we don't get a plot so much as a succession of characters. Virtually none of the storytelling devices that were crucial to most previous novelists were of much use to Lawrence, simply because most of those devices were aids in creative exposition, whereas the narrative in this novel is minimal.

Second, abandoning plot, Lawrence attempts to frame a novel around characterization, but having determined to focus on character development, he furthermore refuses to focus on a single character. There is no central protagonist to the novel (though Ursula, who will be the protagonist of WOMEN IN LOVE, comes close), but a collection of characters that as a group command our interest.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
I successively declare each Lawrence novel I encounter to be the best I've read, but in my opinion, "The Rainbow" is especially brilliant in its painstaking and accurate depiction of the universal experience of adolescence...and especially noteworthy in its spot-on description of the evolving feelings and thoughts of adolescent girls. Lawrence's feeling for and understanding of his female characters is astounding, particularly when compared with that of other writers of his time.
This work is sometimes criticized because of "repetitiveness" in the writing, but I find the repeated phrases add to, not detract from, the power of the novel. As in Lady Chatterley, he also manages to work in many brilliant and cutting observations of the price of progress in an industrial society, and document in careful, keen-eyed accuracy the varying responses of his characters--and, through them, archetypal human responses--to that society.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By K.S.Ziegler on October 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
Much criticism has been leveled at D. H. Lawrence, from varying levels of sophistication and experience, but here is a novel to justify his continuing high place among English novelists, now as much as ever.

The story line runs chronologically. The events detail three generations of the Brangwan family, and occur mostly around the turn of the twentieth century, in the same coal mining area where Lawrence came of age. The Industrial Revolution was in full sway and had changed the lives of most people, but the Brangwan family had managed to steer away from at least some of it's influences by owning a rich plot of farmland and also by being blessed with some artistic talent. Though the coal and iron mining that fed the Industrial Machine had a positive material advantage when considering the mean and menial conditions of previous centuries, the grime and ugliness, the pollution, and the conditions of hard labor were not always such an improvement and made some wonder what had gone wrong or whether there was a way out. Also at this time, England, in order to secure it's preeminence as a global power, had become exploitive in Africa and India, two places where the character Anton Skrebensky was stationed.

Most of the book is about the youth and coming to age of Ursula Brangwan. The book follows the lives of her Grandfather and parents, but that's mostly background, setting the stage for Ursula. What is especially notable is the focus that the author has into the inner lives of his characters: their struggles and what they are faced with, their emotions, desires, yearnings. The actual events have a secondary importance. Hardly anything very dramatic as an action or confluence of events ever occurs.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 10, 1998
Format: Paperback
Lawrence's fame (or notoriety) rests on his sexual frankness, but what a lot of readers overlook is how well he wrote about parent-child relationships and family dynamics. The beginning of this novel is absolutely brilliant: Tom Brangwen and the Polish widow marry in haste, then find that they still haven't worked out their relationship. Her young daughter is an uneasy third party, and the child's sensitivity to the unease in their household is beautifully described, as well as her stepfather's gentle efforts to befriend her. As Lawrence continues the family history, his usual obsessions surface. But in general, it's a good story: sex is an organic part of his characters' lives rather than the mainspring of the whole plot (as in some of his other novels). And the characters come across as multi-dimensional human beings rather than talking heads (or other organs) for Lawrence's comments on life. A good novel for people who "don't like D.H. Lawrence."
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?