Lights Out 1 Season 2011

Amazon Instant Video

Season 1
(12) IMDb 7.7/10
Available in HD

11. Rainmaker TV-MA CC

Lights tries to help a penniless and punch drunk former champ, even while his own future is threatened by a talkative witness.

Starring:
Holt McCallany, Stacy Keach
Runtime:
43 minutes
Original air date:
March 22, 2011

Available to watch on supported devices.

Rainmaker

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Season 1

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 12 customer reviews
Great acting and an amazing story.
E. Okparaeke
And lights out is one of the top quality series i have watched in my life lights out -you don't watch it ,you live it .
marsel
How far can a basically good guy be pushed?
K. Harris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

With the debut of the original FX television drama "Lights Out," I actually had very little interest in watching a series centered around boxing. It just seemed fodder for every sports cliche that we've seen played out in countless ways over the years. However, I had faith in the network programmers as FX is responsible for two of my all time favorites in "The Shield" and "Damages" (but I've pretty much watched every show to come out of their stable!). I must say, that I've really enjoyed "Lights Out" as a slow build entertainment that combines its boxing tale with equal parts familial drama and criminal intrigue. The resultant program, far subtler than the more talked about craziness of two of the networks benchmark shows "Nip/Tuck" and "Rescue Me," benefits from a quiet intensity and realistic characterizations lacking from the bolder and more outrageous FX options. In my mind, this show is a fascinating and gritty look at the underbelly of the sporting arena.

Centered around a former heavyweight champion (underplayed well by Holt McCallany), "Lights Out" is set several years after his retirement just as his world is starting to crumble. The family's extravagant lifestyle is in jeopardy as money making opportunities become less and less prevalent. The finances are managed by McCallany's ne'er-do-well brother, played by Pablo Schreiber, and some unwise choices has our champ against the ropes. Unwilling to stage a comeback based on a promise he made to his wife (as well as the possible onset of a boxer's dementia), McCallany scrambles to uphold the financial backing to which his family has become accustomed. This brings him into contact with some unscrupulous and dubious types, including "businessman" Bill Irwin, who have our hero questioning his moral compass.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Kohout Jr. on November 29, 2012
NO SPOILERS:

I cannot improve on K. Harris's overview and general critique. Therefore, I am offering my perspective as a fan of "The Sweet Science" (AKA boxing). I have attended many of the most noteworthy fights over the past 10-years (I.E. De La Joya/Mayweather) and have watched many more on TV and even have a few vague memories of being taken as a child to historic fights shown on "close circuit" (before cable and pay-per-view, major fights were broadcast live in movie theaters). Truth be told, some of the largest single event wagers that I have ever made were on the outcome of a fight.

"Lights Out" captures in dramatic detail all that I know to be true about boxing and fighters:

1.) The effects of dementia from taking numerous hits to the head

2.) A general ignorance about financial matters

3.) Over-reliance on family to fill roles that would be better served by professionals (I.E. Investing/Money Management)

4.) The effects of "falling from grace"

Patrick Leary (AKA "Lights") has experienced all of the above. From memory loss and constant headaches to essentially losing his savings on a business deal managed by his brother to taking work as a celebrity number caller at a bingo parlor and debt collection (for a local loan shark), to ultimately deciding that the only way back is to take a series of fights that will build up to a title fight and the big payday that he needs for his family to survive.

The series draws from a culmination of events that effected known fighters. Sonny Liston was a "leg breaker" and "bag man" for the mafia. Ali suffers from dementia. Foreman made a comeback at age 45, not having fought for 10-years and was working as a minister in Houston at a storefront church.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By louis on March 17, 2011
Verified Purchase
If the Sopranos and Rocky banged on a showtime's copy machine, this might be its bastard child. the pilot was pretty good, but the show gets deeper with each episode. the soundtrack is amazing, especially the shows original music. well worth the time. i didnt expect to like it this much.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Josiah G. Glickstein on June 29, 2011
This is one of those "cancelled too soon" shows; well, to me, anyway. The great thing about Lights Out is that it can stand as a 13 part miniseries if you like because the show runners do a good job of tying off a lot of loose ends. Strong acting, good pacing, and great characters make this a must see for me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on November 29, 2012
With the debut of the original FX television drama "Lights Out," I actually had very little interest in watching a series centered around boxing. It just seemed fodder for every sports cliche that we've seen played out in countless ways over the years. However, I had faith in the network programmers as FX is responsible for two of my all time favorites in "The Shield" and "Damages" (but I've pretty much watched every show to come out of their stable!). I must say, that I've really enjoyed "Lights Out" as a slow build entertainment that combines its boxing tale with equal parts familial drama and criminal intrigue. The resultant program, far subtler than the more talked about craziness of two of the networks benchmark shows "Nip/Tuck" and "Rescue Me," benefits from a quiet intensity and realistic characterizations lacking from the bolder and more outrageous FX options. In my mind, this show is a fascinating and gritty look at the underbelly of the sporting arena.

Centered around a former heavyweight champion (underplayed well by Holt McCallany), "Lights Out" is set several years after his retirement just as his world is starting to crumble. The family's extravagant lifestyle is in jeopardy as money making opportunities become less and less prevalent. The finances are managed by McCallany's ne'er-do-well brother, played by Pablo Schreiber, and some unwise choices has our champ against the ropes. Unwilling to stage a comeback based on a promise he made to his wife (as well as the possible onset of a boxer's dementia), McCallany scrambles to uphold the financial backing to which his family has become accustomed. This brings him into contact with some unscrupulous and dubious types, including "businessman" Bill Irwin, who have our hero questioning his moral compass.
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