Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 1 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by iOverstocks
Condition: Used: Like New
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction Paperback – January 30, 2001


See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.00
$4.19 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction + Nine Stories + The Catcher in the Rye
Price for all three: $33.71

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
  • Nine Stories $14.00
  • The Catcher in the Rye $5.71

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books (January 30, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316766941
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316766944
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #392,607 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

"Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters" tells the story of Seymour's wedding.
A. T. A. Oliveira
The second story, "Seymore, an Introduction," gets bogged down, but it's still quite good.
Eddie Webster
This book should be read once the reader has finished Salinger's other works.
Christopher Moore (chris_moore@hotmail.com)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 45 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 17, 2005
Format: Turtleback
Commonly mislabeled the worst of the Glass family saga, and of J.D. Salinger's work in general, Raise High the Roofbeam Carpenters, and Seymour, an Introduction, deserves much praise. Salinger takes a lot of care and thought in writing these two short stories. Raise High the Roofbeam, Carpenters features Buddy Glass attending his brother, Seymour's wedding. Seymour never physically appears in this story, but Buddy narrates so much about him that he is very much a main character. Seymour, an Introduction is a more difficult read. What at first appears incessant ramblings of a grief stricken sibling, at second glance becomes a well crafted work of genuis. Every word is carefully placed, to describle Seymour, Buddy's relationship with Seymour, and Seymour's impact on everyone he met. While getting through the second story, may be difficult it is a worthwhile challenge. You will learn everything about Seymour, from the way he wrote poetry, to the way he shot his marbles, and from Seymour you will learn an entirely new way to view the world, and everyone in it.

-PRBecki
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Bridget Purcell on July 7, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Both of these stories were beautiful, beautiful beautiful. It baffles me to read all of these reviews written by people who were wild about "Raise high..." and almost indifferent toward "Seymour:" I feel that Seymour was the single most important book out of the Glass series. Yes, it's difficult to get through the first time, because, as Buddy says, the General Reader's most immediate want is to "see the author get the hell on with his story," which Buddy doesn't do because, really, there is no "story." However, if you are the type of person who can sit still long enough to follow through with Buddy's run on sentences and footnotes, et cetera, you will find, tucked in several places throughout the story, "the good, the real," the holy. I've read this book about 5 times, and I can't help walking around dazed for days after I'm through with it, marvelling at the tiny things that have suddenly taken on a sort of surreal beauty. My personal Salinger favorite. -Bridgdawg@aol.com
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Helter Peal on August 23, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Truly, what a wonderful final publication for Salinger. While many might argue the point of Salinger's work being over-hyped, it is just that which makes ALL of Salinger's work really, under-estimated. Criticisms ran aloft when Carpenters/Seymour first came out (read the absolutely cruel New Yorker review) but this collection of short stories truly is wonderful art. Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters is a wonderfully constructed story, with each part leading beautifully into the next. However, it reads almost like any other Salinger story (which is not by all means a bad thing). It is with Seymour: An Introduction that J.D. really mesmerizes, totally disregarding most any kind of story-telling guidelines. He rambles on and on, and never really stops, but it is within this incessant rambling that its true wonder lies. Deep with compassion, often funny and full of wisdom, I think I can safely say that it is like nothing you will ever read. Like all Salinger work, its first impact might be that of a disastrous nonlinear tale (the New Yorker review suggested the title be Seymour: A Disaster) and in a way its as if Salinger was a "seer" in that he predicted there'd be those readers who'd wish he would just "get the hell on with the story". However, those readers patient and allowing enough to let the many layers unravel themselves will be justly rewarded.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Sam Wise on March 15, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Just what it is about Salinger I don't know, but I was captivated from the first time I read Franny and Zooey. Maybe it's the down to earthness of the dialogue, the kookiness of the characters. Maybe it's the way he says things worth saying without being too lofty or literary, or maybe it's the way that you feel part of his world, get into the heads of the characters. Whatever it is it's good, and too complicated to define easily, which makes it better. Buy this book and all the books. The Glass family can be your friends too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jonathon on January 7, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was recently paging through a new book by Nick Hornby (High Fidelity, About a Boy) where he offhandedly comments on various works of literature he has been reading-- it seemed like a clever idea, and I was bored. Apparently, Mr. Hornby read through the entire work of Salinger in a week. Though he was largely satisfied with Salinger's collection of stories, he complained that these last two entries in the Glass Family Saga (which I am reviewing here) were tedious. Hornby noted that he wasn't very interested in the character of Seymour, and he especially didn't care about how Seymour shot his marbles.

Well, I'm afraid that if you've read any of the Glass family stories and don't care much for Seymour, then you had better avoid this two story collection. Salinger's work (including Catcher) is permeated with the loss of a brother who meant the world to his siblings. Every crease and crevice of his face was meaningful, every sigh and utterance. The way Seymour shot his marbles as a boy DOES have relevance, because his philosophy of not aiming (a variation on the Zen practice of archery) is one of the central themes of the stories.

Thus, if the appearance of aimlessness bothers you (the narrator of these two stories, Buddy, is a strong adherent-- so watch out), then you might want to stick to more conventional fiction. I found the entire five story cycle to be the one of most profound pieces of work I have ever come across, but then again-- Seymour isn't for everyone.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?