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Raised by Wolves
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
Format: HardcoverVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Fifteen-year-old Bryn has, literally, been raised by wolves. At the age of four, her parents were murdered by a rogue ("rabid") werewolf, and Bryn barely avoided their fate when she was rescued by Callum, the powerful, ancient alpha in charge of the local werewolf pack. Callum placed Bryn under his particular protection and enfolded her into his pack, and he put her in the care of another human, a woman named Ali who is only 17 years older than Bryn. In addition to granting Ali great latitude in raising Bryn as her own daughter, Callum has permitted Bryn to engage in a highly unusual mental resistance to the engulfing tide of the pack's all-inclusive telepathic connection. He has also offered her a remarkable amount of freedom from his alpha ability to compel obedience on all the werewolves in his pack. The combination of uncommon freedom with an innately forceful personality has led Bryn to engage in a great many verbal and behavioral rebellions over the years, which Callum has responded to with remarkable patience and tolerance. But one of the things Callum has absolutely insisted on since earliest childhood that Bryn has always eagerly agreed to is a strict daily regimen of exercise and training in various warrior arts. Bryn runs up to 12 miles per day, climbs extremely tall trees, practices martial arts, trains with guns and knives, and engages in hand-to-hand combat with werewolves in their human form.

After over a decade of close, affectionate supervision, Bryn would have sworn that she could trust Callum in every possible way, most especially that he would never lie to her, either directly or by omission, and he would certainly never allow harm of any kind to come to her. But all of those assumptions are blown away the day she discovers a teenage boy named Chase in a cage in Callum's basement. Chase has been turned into a werewolf by the savage, bloody attack of a rabid werewolf. He holds the secret to the elusive memories Bryn has of the rogue werewolf that destroyed Bryn's family, but Callum refuses to allow Bryn to pursue that crucial information--on threat of dire pack punishment if she disobeys.

I absolutely love this book! I read a lot of urban fantasy, both for adults and teens, and the ones I like the most have great characters with loyal, protective, loving relationships which invariably are the force driving all the action. The protagonists of such stories get into lots of high-octane trouble because they are highly sympathetic, positive warriors who will risk everything, including their lives, to help the humans and nonhumans that they love. Bryn is a worthy addition to the best of urban fantasy in this regard. She starts out the book sounding as if she might just be an ordinary, rebellious teenager, but in fact she is rushing headlong across the length of the book toward becoming an amazing person. Someone with tremendous potential for caring for and loving others, both as a nurturer, protector and leader.

I am a huge fan of Patricia Briggs's werewolf-based urban fantasies for adults, such as Book 1 in the Mercy Thompson series, Moon Called, and I'm also a big fan of the Twilight urban-fantasy series for young adults. For readers who like comparisons, I would say that this book--the start of what looks to be an extremely promising new series--is much closer to Briggs than Meyer in her approach to urban fantasy. Romance is the center of Twilight, but in RBW, the core of the story, as in the Mercy Thompson series with Briggs, is a very strong heroine discovering across the first book in the series who she is and the range and force of her unique gifts.

I believe that all YA novels, no matter what type, are enriched by a strong band of friends surrounding the protagonist, but loyal allies are absolutely crucial for emotionally compelling urban fantasy. I'm delighted to report that this book has that component in spades. Bryn has a sixteen-year-old BFF, Devon, who is a purebred werewolf (a were born of two werewolves, an extremely rare event in this book's cosmology, since only one or two female werewolves are born every hundred years). Dev also happens to be a gorgeous, six-foot-four hunk with a quirky sense of humor who loves to sing and act in plays. Bryn is also very close to ready-for-anything, fifteen-year-old female werewolf, Lake, who adores guns. And most of all, she can count on Chase, the fifteen-year-old, made-by-bite werewolf. Bryn has an intense emotional and romantic connection with Chase that transcends time and space and is extremely moving. Fans of Edward and Bella, take note--this is a great romance!

I also find it brilliant the way that the author manages to allow Bryn and her teen allies to accomplish amazing things in the climax of the story in spite of the over-protectiveness, and sometimes active hostile opposition, of dozens of adult werewolves. So many YA's create the necessary opening for independent, self-actualizing, dramatic action by the teen protagonists by having the adults in their lives be callously or selfishly neglectful. But the adults in this book are the dead opposite of that cliché. They are so totally involved with Bryn, they are practically smothering her with over-protectiveness.

Finally, and very importantly, this book is extremely well written. The language in the book serves the story, rather than the other way around, and it doesn't scream a message, so it is definitely not lit fic. It is truly excellent popular fiction, meaning the heroine has a strong goal, takes dramatic action to get it, comes up against powerful resistance, and ultimately achieves a very satisfying, upbeat resolution.

I cannot wait to read the next book in this series. The setup the author has created for future adventures is extremely original, compelling and heart-warming.

I highly recommend this book not only for teens, but for any adult who loves urban fantasy. It can safely be read by kids as young as 12. Though some parents might find the violence PG, it is not particularly graphic, and the book is G-Rated as to sensuality and bad language.

I rate this book as follows:

Heroine: 5
Love interest: 5
Subcharacters: 5
Family of Affiliation: 5
Fantasy World-Building: 4
Writing: 5
Action-Adventure Plot: 5
Mystery Plot: 5
Romantic Plot: 5
Overall: 5
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Format: HardcoverVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This review contains SPOILERS.

I'm of two minds about Raised by Wolves. It features a suspenseful plot (especially in the second half) and one really good message, but also includes, possibly by accident, a couple of disturbing messages.

Bronwyn "Bryn" Clare is a human girl being raised by werewolves. As a little girl, she and her parents were attacked by a feral werewolf, a "Rabid." A pack of "good" werewolves burst into the house and rescued Bryn but were too late to save her parents. Bryn is now fifteen, and like many teenagers, is chafing at the restrictions placed on her by her adoptive family. This only intensifies when she meets Chase, a cute boy who was Changed by a Rabid and is now in pack custody. Bryn is drawn to him and to the idea that he might be able to tell her more about the attack she survived all those years ago.

At about the halfway point of the book, Bryn breaks pack law and is badly abused for it. It was here that I nearly gave up on Raised by Wolves. The problem is not that there's abuse in the book (though this scene is hard to read); bad things happen to people in real life and in fiction. The problem is that Bryn seems to think it's a just punishment for her actions. Her human adoptive mother, Ali, uses this as a reason to leave the Pack and take Bryn far away, and I'm in total agreement with Ali:

"The fact that you don't hate him for this breaks my heart. And if we weren't leaving because of what they'd done to you, we'd be leaving because the pack has twisted you enough to make you think that it's okay for someone to treat you that way."

I did persevere with the book and I'm glad I did. Bryn learns that something horrible is going on and that the werewolf Senate wants to sit by and let it happen. She gathers a few friends -- Chase, plus "metrosexual werewolf" Devon and weapon-obsessed Lake -- and hatches a plan to stop the atrocity. Bryn really comes into her strength here, and it seemed the book had redeemed itself and that Bryn had realized her abuser wasn't worthy of the pass she was giving him. I can't say I like the answer to why some people live when bitten by werewolves and others die; it smacks a little of blaming the victims if they don't survive. But other than that, the second half is great.

Until we get to the ending, and Bryn's abuser shows up and explains his reasons. It was all part of a master plan, you see. So it's okay. Yuck.

So, Raised by Wolves is, on the one hand, a story about how an underdog becomes a leader and a hero. On the other hand, at times it seems like a story about how abuse is sometimes justified and how anyone who dies in a violent assault is somehow "lacking."

The romance aspect doesn't really work either; we don't get to know Chase well enough for that. There is literally nothing between Bryn and Chase besides mutual stubbornness and their supernatural bond. Friendships are well-drawn, though; Bryn's relationships with Devon and Lake are beautiful. I also loved Ali and her kids. Especially Kaitlin. How adorable!

Overall, Raised by Wolves isn't quite up to the level of Maggie Stiefvater's Shiver or Jackson Pearce's Sisters Red, but you might enjoy it if you liked those books. Just be prepared for some seriously dysfunctional werewolves.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon June 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Bryn was only 4 when her parents were brutally murdered by a Rabid werewolf she fearfully refers to as the Big Bad Wolf. Even now, years later, she still seizes up in fear whenever she is around weres who are closer to their wolf side as opposed to their human side.

Callum, the alpha who marked Bryn as his, only has said young girl's best interests in mind. Which is why, when a new "threat" enters the wolf pack's territory, Callum makes express orders that Bryn will not discover what this new presence is. Bryn, however, will not take this order lightly. Even if it kills her, she is determined to discover what the entire pack is hiding from her. But when she finds out what it is, will she ultimately regret her actions...?

I read this book in one night. As you all have seen recently, I am slightly biased when it comes to werewolves. I pretty much love any were story I have the fortune of stumbling upon as long as it is well written, entertaining, and convincing. In some ways, while I am biased, I'm also more critical of these types of stories due to my... adoration for these furry creatures. When an author captures the mannerisms of a werewolf (the social, the physical, their hierarchy system, etc) and explores it successfully, that, in my eyes, is a wonderful book.

All of the characters in Raised by Wolves are so vivid and unique, you can't help but love them all. Bryn is a spunky human being, holding her own amongst her werewolf "relatives". Her best friend Devon will randomly burst out into show-tunes and is like the big brother I wish I had. Lake is a crazy female werewolf in love with guns. Chase is the mysterious and harassed love interest. Callum was that alpha I wish I could date. And finally, Lily and Kate are two young werewolves who are so cute and adorable that I wish they were real so I could hug and love them!

Jennifer has a knack for not only creating unique and awesome characters, but also creating heart-thumping, glued-to-your-page action scenes. She had a unique voice throughout the book, and a plot that I thought was also unique. The ending of the book was something that I did not expect to have happen, which is always a plus in my eyes. If I have a pretty good hunch of the direction/what will happen for a book, it's less exciting for me. This plot, however, kept me on my toes from the first page all the way to the last. I must admit, though, that one part with the four friends being able to connect was perhaps a bit too convenient, but I still enjoyed it.

I absolutely loved the way she described interactions betwixt the wolves. Like I said earlier, one of my favorite aspects to a great werewolf story is the exploration of the animalistic interactions they have between each other. Raised by Wolves does a wonderful job of doing that. There are some scenes that will make you feel warm and fuzzy due to the cuteness factor alone. If you don't like Lily and Kate, I don't know what's wrong with you.

If you're a fan of werewolf stories, and don't mind reading YAs, then I definitely suggest checking out this new title. If you're a YA fan, you'll adore this story, even if werewolves aren't your favorite of the immortals. Bryn's character developed fully throughout the tale, transforming from a young, immature child into a naturally responsible leader. As for the rest of you who don't care much for werewolves or YAs, well, I suggest reading it anyway for the suspense, humor, and cuteness factors. Plus, Callum's awesome. What more can you ask for?
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
Gold Star Award Winner!

As a young girl, Bryn lost her parents in a brutal attack. Callum, the alpha of his werewolf pack, brought her into his circle and treated her like a daughter. As the only human in the pack, Bryn has always felt like an outsider.

Until a new wolf, Chase, appears.

Chase wasn't born a wolf. Bryn instinctively knows that she must meet him. As he's locked away for his own protection by Callum, she goes to Callum for permission to see him. Bryn asks Callum, not as a daughter would ask a father, but as a member asking the Alpha. Therefore, she must abide by his decisions and his rules.

He declares that she will be allowed to see Chase if she meets the following conditions: first, she will train until he's satisfied that she can defend herself should the need arise. Second, there will be pack members with her at all times, and these pack members have his authority during the meetings. Third, she must open herself up to the pack bond and become an insider. Finally, she must agree not to attend the next Senate meeting of Alphas.

Bryn, annoyed and confused by some of the conditions, agrees to all of his demands. Once she's allowed to meet Chase, she feels a very strong connection to him. She wants to know what happened to allow the change from human to wolf. As far as she knows, nothing like this has ever happened. She won't rest until she uncovers the truth.

The truth is twisted in a way that combines her past with her present, and once she gains that knowledge, nothing will stop her from taking charge - not even the Alpha's commands. With a powerful connection between her and Chase, her life will never be the same.

Jennifer Lynn Barnes pens an amazing werewolf tale that leaves you breathless for more. Besides the paranormal aspect, RAISED BY WOLVES touches on friendship, loyalty, betrayal, strength, family, and a little romance. It's absolutely perfect, and I can't wait for the sequel.

Reviewed by: Jennifer Rummel
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
Bryn is a 15 year old human girl raised by a pack of werewolves.

There are a lot of YA (and adult for that matter) books out there that say they have strong female characters but when push comes to shove they get weak kneed at some point, usually it's because the new hot boy in school walks by or maybe because they are crippled by self-doubt. Not in Raised by Wolves - Bryn is tough. She saw her parents murdered by a rogue wolf when she was 4 years old then was rescued and marked by a pack alpha - Callum. He raised her among his pack, teaching her how to survive surrounded by mostly territorial male wolves. They are her family, yet she never feels like she fully belongs in their world or the human world anymore for that matter. She lives in a society that expects submission, particularly from its female members and Bryn just isn't having any of that.
But when Bryn meets Chase - a teenage boy that survives an attack by a rogue werewolf, latent instincts kick in and she finds herself plunging deeper into werewolf society than she ever thought possible.
This is a girl meets boy story, but it's so much more than that and that's where its strengths lie. Barnes doesn't make this about lust or obsession. She develops all of Bryn's relationships. My favorite is the one between her and Callum - her pack alpha and father figure. It is so unusual for an author to delve that deep into any relationship that isn't the main love interest never mind a parental relationship. Devon is the "metrosexual" best friend (who I adore!), Lake - her kick ass, weapon toting girlfriend, and Amy - her human mother figure and protector. All are perfect additions to the story.
Every character in Raised by Wolves has an interesting story to tell and could easily have a book of their own. In fact, although I'm not usually a fan of multiple POV's, this is a story where I would have welcomed it. If the author ever ventures into the adult genre - I would like to put in a request for the first book to be about Callum.
In some ways Raised by Wolves made me think of Hunger Games. I hesitate to even say this because to me The Hunger Games trilogy is the holy grail of YA right now but it does remind me of that series in the sense that it's completely original (to me anyway) and all the characters have such an innate sense of kindness and decency and tenacity that you can't help but like and root for all of them, even when they are on different sides of an issue. I'm also sensing an epic "Peeta vs. Gale" type battle coming on.
If I have one complaint...if you even want to call it that, it would be that in the beginning Bryn's mind wanders a lot - especially when people are talking to her. She evens calls it her "mind bunnies". It was used as a way to introduce the reader to the pack mentality and backstory but I found myself getting a little distracted myself and the talk about "The Pack/ submission & dominance" got heavy handed and repetitive at times. It does have a purpose though and contributes to the overall story.
This book ends by solving one mystery and setting up more ominous threats in the future. The dynamics are so different at the end of this book vs the beginning that there is no way book two will just be a retread of the first which makes me so deliriously happy ... I can't even tell you how much!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on February 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
I have been burned by massively disappointing YA books far too many times for me to take risks with the genre, but hey, guess i'm a sucker for punishment.
Raised by Wolves by Jennifer Lynn Barnes had a dynamic, eye-catching cover and an interesting blurb and so, being the fool I am, I bought it. Truthfully, almost everything in paranormal YA is gifted with gorgeous packaging but very few of these books manage to live up to the promise.

I have lifted this review to two stars from one because the first few chapters were quite interesting and engaging and for all its faults, I did finish Raised by Wolves. And there is one character Ali, who was really interesting, she has a very authentic, believable presence on the page and I was totally on her side. Ali had real depth and stuck by her convictions which I respected.

Unfortunately the stuff I disliked about this book vastly outweighs the positives listed above.

Firstly, the names. I found the names really annoying and lame. They were mostly one syllable whitetrashy names that for some reason got on my nerves like crazy. Plus I kept forgetting which was which. We have: Chase, Shay, Lake, Bryn and others I can't remember. Irrational though this is, I just HATED the names.

The writing seemed really good for the first few chaps and then began to repeat and recycle. Sentences with a) and b) to explain things in a cute way became more and more prevalent and NOT in a cute way.
A lot of things were described as "disturbingly" something. I think disturb or some form of that word appeared five times a chapter. Plus there were these trios of italics to describe wolf-like feelings that always appeared like this:

Pack
Pack
Pack

Alpha
Alpha
Alpha

Blood
Blood
Blood

Which made me all:

Kill
Me
Now

And then sentences were way too long only to be broken by one word statements. There is an in-between you know.

I might be too big of a cynic but all the tough talk and "bad*ass" one-liners just made me cringe.

Things like: "This S.O.B was dead."
And: "Boys, it's hunting season. Weapon up."
And: "Lets go kill the Big Bad Wolf."

Yikes. Sixteen year olds talking like that is just sort of... random. I didn't buy it. But I did cringe... a lot.

Spoilers ahead<-------

Plot wise, I found myself becoming seriously irritated with the rampant Deus ex machina.
Things kept emerging out of nowhere and seemed really flippin convenient. Like, Oh hey, Bryn can totally reverse and alter Pack bonds with whoever she wants any time. It's just a special little power she appears to have been born with. Kindly suspend disbelief.
Then in order to account for all his weird, contrary behaviour in the last three-hundred pages, we're told that Yo, Callum's a psychic so s'all good. He *apparently* knew exactly how things had to roll out and that's why he arranged for Bryn to be beaten to near death and for Ali, her human mother figure, to be forced to leave her husband and move hundreds of miles away.
Mmmmmkay...
Right at the end, we're told that Bryn is a "resilient" which is apparently a human that happens to have strongly resilient tendencies and would thus survive being bitten and turned into a werewolf whereas your run of the mill human would die. Being a Resilient not only conveniently explains all Bryn's unlikely powers and strengths, it allows her to connect with all the other resilients the big bad wolf who killed her parents has hiding in his cabin in the woods and steal their pack bonds. Which is lucky, because you know, a second ago they were gonna tear her friends apart.
Deus es machina is SO annoying.

I also didn't get why the alphas who wanted the Rabid's secret for turning humans into werewolves didn't just kidnap and torture him (which they seem all too happy to do with young boys and girls) to get their answers. Seemed easier than quote: "making a deal with the devil."
Then by the end of the book, Bryn is fully challenging them and they just walk away, because Callum had insisted they obey democratic pack law. Why wouldn't they argue on the basis that Bryn is NOT a werewolf and thus can't be an Alpha with her own pack.

The biggest of my beefs, is the romance. C'mon, we all know that we buy these paranormal YA books expecting some angsty teen romance.
In Raised by Wolves, Chase appears on the scene very quickly and immediately declares that he is in love with Bryn and always has been... even though they've never even met. Though it's annoying, I let this overused plot device go, but then, Chase occupies exceedinly little page time from here on out, so what's the point?
Bryn finds herself uncharacteristically drawn to Chase, but not really in a romantic way. She tells him that their bond is one without any possessive, weirdness in it and thats about it. Chase has no personality. He loves Bryn and has trouble with the Rabid in his nightmares and that's about all we know about him. He runs to protect Bryn and do her bidding but is about as interesting and distinctive as milk.
It felt like this romance was just shoved into the story to fill the expected teen love requirement in these sort of books. It was the worst 'romance' I've ever read. Ever. Should have just left it out. Not slipped it in as a random afterthought.

Raised by Wolves was an epic disappointment.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
I hate werewolves. That is important here, because I honest to Jebus hate them, can't stand them, wish I'd never have to hear about them again, etc. So much that I haven't even read Shiver. Yes, I know I'm going to hell, we'll talk about that later though (or not). I'm not really sure what it is about werewolves that make me dislike them so much, I can't put my finger on it. I like American Werewolf in Paris, Underworld, Dog Soldiers and Big Wolf on Campus, but that's about where my acceptance of them stops. Raised by Wolves That's why when Emilee offered me a copy of Raised by Wolves I was very skeptical. I looked around though and a TON of people were excited about it, including a lot of people I had similar tastes with - and then, I saw the cover. I am a picture person, plain and simple. A good and catching synopsis is very important - but a great cover that makes me stop in my tracks in the middle of a store is even better. And had the ARC cover made it onto the final copy of Raised by Wolves it would have done just that. It has absolutely got one of the most beautiful covers I've ever seen. I like the final cover, but the ARC cover is something I'd hang on a wall.

After such a GREAT cover you'd figure the book would have to suck because how could so much AWESOME be contained? But you know what? It was, because not only was the cover amazing, the story was even better. Bryn was such a strong and energetic character, it was hard not to love her. Really really hard, because I couldn't (not love her, that is). Throughout the entire book the only thing that ever got on my nerves about any of the characters actually was Bryn and how defiant she could be. I can understand being curious and having the naivety to think that you know better than your caretakers but the absolute reckless abandon she had at times drove me insane. If you have an idea to do something, and chances are you'll probably die doing it, you should probably NOT do it. Having said that though, it was really the only thing that bothered me about any of the characters. They were all really strong and very well developed.

The plot was just as good as the characters, if not better. There was never a moment once I started reading where I was bored, or where I considered putting the book down. Once I started, I was in it for the long haul. Raised by Wolves was fast paced and very entertaining, always giving you bits of information about characters, their back stories and sub-plots at all the right times. I never once questioned the world that Jennifer built and that Bryn and her family and friends lived in. It felt real, and the whole thing kept me on the edge of my seat until the very last page.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on May 25, 2010
Format: HardcoverVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I really liked this new take on Werewolves and I felt that Ms. Barnes did a wonderful job at creating relateable and interesting supernatural being that we, as readers, could empathize with.

When Bryn was four years old, her parents were killed by a rogue werewolf and Bryn was adopted into a werewolf pack by its alpha, Callum. After Callum Marked her, making her one of the pack, Bryn has felt safe and protected by her werewolf brothers and sisters, even though she's fought to keep as much of her independence as possible. But when a new werewolf, Chase, is found and brought to the pack, Bryn is compelled to see him. And what she finds out will change everything.

While a lot of this story reminded me of Kelley Armstrong's PHENOMINAL debut novel, Bitten, Barnes has crafted a wholly unique world with her werewolves. There may be bits of Elena in our main character Bryn, but she is still her own person and she was a totally intriguing character to go on a literature adventure with. Bryn has a snarky, dry-wit that SCREAMED "modern teenager" to me. I loved that Bryn wasn't the wallflower type of character that we are seeing a lot in current YA fiction. She is no Bella! She has personality and spunk and she felt far more gripping as a character to me. I enjoyed exploring Jennifer Lynn Barnes's take on the werewolf lore and there's a bit of a sizzling romance that'll please anyone yearning for some Twilight/Shiver-like vibes. I have always been a fan of werewolves and I REALLY enjoyed this one! I highly recommend it!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover
"Bronwyn Alessia St. Vincent Clare,
or "Bryn" for short, is fully human but
raised by Callum, who took her in his care
ten years back when a Rabid werewolf mutt
destroyed her family. Bryn's place in the world
is pretty strange--most wolves are weirded out
that alpha Callum would adopt a human girl.
Her pack role is strained when she learns about
a new wolf, Chase, who shouldn't exist,
and says he was attacked by a Rabid "were."
Is the monster still alive? Bryn can't resist
her bond with Chase, and change is in the air.
A great werewolf YA, a great debut,
with only minor setbacks, in my view."

As I'd been told, Raised by Wolves is one of the most convincing portrayals of wolf pack interaction that I've seen, on par with Kelley Armstrong's Otherworld and Patricia Briggs' Alpha & Omega wolves. The MC isn't even a werewolf, and the mentality of the pack is still crystal clear. The worldbuilding is also impressive. Weres are nearly ageless after puberty, and all girl wolves die in the womb unless they have a male twin brother, so the guy wolves have human wives, most of whom die in childbirth. It's a convincing setup with lots of built-in problems and conflict. Bryn's bond with Chase is intriguing and very believable.

I think I would have found the story a lot more satisfying if Bryn were seventeen or eighteen instead of fifteen. Some of the challenges and responsibilities she faces seem better suited to an older person, and I also think the budding relationship with Chase would've been better served by older ages. Bryn's attitudes can seem very young, and though I admire the individuality and strength shown by her defiance of authority, at times the wisdom of such moves is questionable. She'll know perfectly well that a certain course of action is going to end badly and painfully, and she'll do it anyway. I was glad when she started approaching her problems with an emphasis on logic and problem-solving instead of rushing right on through without a plan.

It's an emotionally wrenching story, and I was seriously upset whenever Callum and Bryn were at odds because Callum is an incredible alpha and an excellent father figure--I'd gladly buy an adult urban fantasy book with him as the main character. I got emotional over Bryn's human foster mother Ali, too, but not always in a good way. IMO, Ali understood the rules of the Pack world, and then when those rules were put into place, she threw a fit and gave up on some good things that she didn't have to do without.

Overall, a great debut with engaging descriptions and a creative plot.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon June 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Some people joke that people with bad manners must've been raised by wolves. Well, Bryn literally way, by werewolves to be exact. After a rogue werewolf brutally killed her parents, four-year-old Bryn was adopted by Callum, the pack alpha. Now fifteen, she figures there's not much she hasn't seen. Nothing prepares her, though, for when she stumbles upon a caged werewolf named Chase. Case was bitten and turned into a werewolf, and his very existence tears apart the relatively safe world she knew. Shuddering from newly dug up memories of her parents' attack and chafing from the increasingly restrictive protections placed on her, Bryn doesn't quite know what to do. There's one thing for sure: Bryn needs answers--and she won't stop until she gets them.

Raised by Wolves is yet another novel catering to the rising werewolf craze. Barnes does not disappoint, serving up plenty of paranormal dangers and wolfy action to keep most readers on the edge of their seat. I was quite pleased, for the most part, with this novel. The characters are interesting and generally realistic, the plot in undoubtedly engaging, and Barnes's handling of the nature and politics of werewolves was superb. There was only one thing that bothered me about this book. It wasn't so big that I can't get over it; however, it made a good chunk of the story really awkward. Raised by Wolves can be divided into three parts. The first and last parts are fine. The middle part is where things go a bit awry. Barnes does not do a good job of connection the first part, a basic introduction, to the last part, where the drama of Bryn and Chase against basically everyone else unfolds. Overlooking that awkward part though, Raised by Wolves is an enjoyable read and a welcome addition to the growing group of werewolf-themed novels.

Raised by Wolves will be enjoyed by werewolf fans, particularly those who enjoyed The Dark Divine by Bree Despain, Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater, Stray by Rachel Vincent, and Twilight by Stephenie Meyer.
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