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Raising Brooklyn: Nannies, Childcare, and Caribbeans Creating Community Paperback – January 24, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press (January 24, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814791433
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814791431
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #558,119 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The cultural community and work environment of West Indian nannies in the gentrifying neighborhood of Park Slope, in Brooklyn, N.Y., is dissected in this exhaustive sociological survey. Special emphasis is given to how these women meet and support each other in an isolating profession; public parks, libraries, even cellphones are all explored as avenues to find solidarity and collectively define the boundaries of "work" in a job that blurs the borders between the personal and professional. Brown, a woman of West Indian descent and a Park Slope mother, is able to move deftly between the worlds of the parents and the child-care providers, obtaining flashes of insight into both sides. Brisk chapters make for a swift read that gives scope if not always depth--a section on the lack of meaningful overtime pay for nannies especially begs for a more detailed look. Still, as a survey it is a vivid snapshot into the lives of women working in a vast, largely unregulated industry, vulnerable to abuses, and defying odds to create a nourishing community. (Jan.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review

“A sensitive and nuanced glimpse into the lives of the women who raise so many of Brooklyn’s—and America’s—children. Mose Brown has given us a deeply compelling and timely ethnography.”
-Philip Kasinitz,co-author of Inheriting the City



“Mose Brown has entered the hidden realm of West Indian childcare workers and produced a remarkable picture of urban life. This is fine grained, careful ethnography that reveals the taken for granted intimacies and politics of everyday experience.”

-Mitchell Duneier,author of Sidewalk

“[An] engrossing look at the Caribbean community of child care workers in Brooklyn, NY”

-Library Journal,

“Vividly written…Mose Brown’s own voice is especially poignant; her reflexivity about her relationships to others as a researcher, fellow New Yorker and mother is a model for contemporary ethnography.”

-Joanna Dreby,author of Divided by Borders: Mexican Migrants and their Children

&8220;Outsiders can only wonder what West Indian caregivers say to each other as they sit on park benches watching their charges. Mose Brown gives us the answer, in an insightful and fascinating account of how these women create their own social worlds in public spaces. A revealing sociological portrait of women whose work and struggles command respect.”

-Julia Wrigley,author of Education and Gender Equity

More About the Author

Tamara Mose Brown is an Assistant Professor in Sociology at Brooklyn College. She was born and raised in Guelph, Ontario Canada and currently resides in Brooklyn, New York. Born of Trinidadian parents, Dr. Mose Brown has published her first book entitled Raising Brooklyn: Nannies, Childcare, and Caribbeans Creating Community.

Customer Reviews

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This is a well written ethnography using good techniques to gather sound information .
KayaLee
It really made me more aware of the struggles of West Indian nannies as women, immigrants, mothers, and childcare workers.
lat2001
This book brings to light the the professionalism of the nannies and the beauty of making a difference in a child's life.
The Saint

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MK on December 8, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mose Brown does an admirable job giving you a really intimate look into the lives, communities, and concerns of West Indian nannies working in Brooklyn. However, her methods (ethnography) are difficult to draw any conclusions from. She reports having interviewed "dozens" of nannies. Dozens! Not even a real number. She also does little to hide her bias, calling a park employee's perspective of how nannies perform their jobs (sitting and talking to each other rather than playing with the kids) "unfair", despite that park employee watching them daily and being entitled to her own opinion like every nanny is. One nanny states that she considers her job to be a modern form of slavery - a statement that Mose Brown supports and develops through her research. Another regrettable aspect of this book is its total lack of attention to the children involved. I expected more about the outcomes for children, or at least how a strong sense of community amongst nannies might somehow enrich the child's experience. After all, are children not the most important figure in the nanny-employer-charge relationship? The answer is "no" based on the direction this book takes. It may be the only decent book available dealing with the issue of ethnic communities of nannies, but I hope something eventually comes out with a more precise methodology. Even some of Mose Brown's intimacy could be sacrificed for the sake of accuracy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By lat2001 on March 12, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mose Brown provides an insightful glimpse into the lives of West Indian nannies who are raising many children in Brooklyn and of New York City. Her writing is vivid and honest, allowing us as the reader entree into the hidden world of childcare work and the immigrant women involved in this important work. Mose Brown gives a fascinating account on how these women develop social spaces and communities in the parks and sidewalks where they are seen daily with the children they care for.

I loved every moment of reading this book. It really made me more aware of the struggles of West Indian nannies as women, immigrants, mothers, and childcare workers.
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By KayaLee on December 30, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book offered great insight into the lives of Caribbean caretakers and their employers. This is a well written ethnography using good techniques to gather sound information . The author's ethnic background and her children help her to gain access into this community which helps with the the personal experiences participants feel comfortable sharing. Mose Brown discusses the tasks of care takers and their relationship to employers. In addition, she incorporates an aspect of activism among the caretakers through DWU. Although the book is set in Brooklyn I think it can give the reader insight to these types of relationship regardless of place due to the fact that issues of racial/ ethnic, cultural and class differences are typical in the nanny and employer relationship. This book is a great read and I would strongly recommend it.
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Format: Paperback
Dr. Brown did a very good job observing, interviewing the day to day activities of these nannies. The book brings awareness to employer's of child care providers. I learned about the DWU and how try really hard to get better wages and benefits for domestic workers. The book is very informative and really looks at the lives of these Caribbean women as they baby sit. They form a bond amongs themselves. You should definately buy this book and keep in your library. Not only is it a good read, it's a fast read. You'll learn alot of research tools such as ethnography, participant observation and interviewing.
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