Raising Sand

October 23, 2007 | Format: MP3

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 23, 2007
  • Label: Rounder Records
  • Total Length: 57:20
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000VQS6G8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (777 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

The songs and the sounds are too much the same.
Patricia A. Jones
You know it's a good album when you go back and listen to it time after time, and it just keeps getting better and better.
E. Firstenberg
I am an avid fan of both Alison Krauss and Robert Plant.
Angie J.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

281 of 308 people found the following review helpful By Dave Goldberg on October 30, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is wonderful listening. Even more, it's truly significant. That's in part because of the reaction _ I don't how many times in the last few months I've read about what seems to "critics'' and others to be a truly strange pairing. Something like: "You'd never expect two singers so far apart to team up, but it seems to work.''

That's nonsense (except the part about it working _ it doesn't "seem,'' it's real.) That's because the "critics'' and others put music in boxes and can't understand a pairing of "bluegrass,'' (the quotes are intentional) and heavy metal. This is Americana, but Americana as interpreted by Plant, Krauss and T-Bone Burnett that transcends category in a way that few albums do. Look on top. How many different categories does it rank No. 1. _ Rock, pop, folk, international. That's what music should be but too often isn't because the folks who run record companies and radio stations want to put music in the narrowest possible category.

It's also a breakthrough for all three artists, including Burnett, but especially Krauss, who in her last few albums has boxed herself in with very nice listenable material that's too often predictable. A couple of the albums won Grammys(she has 20)and they're incredibly well produced and performed, but after a while one Robert Lee Castleman song turns into another and the effect is underwhelming.

On this one, she uses all her talents, even, perhaps even as the excellent producer she is _ Burnett clearly took her advice and Plant's on some of the songs. Her country/bluegrass fiddle turns into gypsy violin on "Sister Rosetta,'' producing a haunting effect that's rarely heard in this kind of music.
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154 of 173 people found the following review helpful By A* VINE VOICE on October 22, 2007
Format: Audio CD
I have been waiting on this disc. I mean really waiting, like marking off the days on a calendar waiting. We don't have to go over the basics, how Plant and Krauss are gifts from the VOCAL GODS!! But what surprises me about this disc is how understated it all is. The music is the winner here -- well, the listener is.

The opening song "Rich Woman" with its elastic bass line and krauss almost purring into an oft-kilter bluesy tone is pure magic, but its also eerie as all get out. But so is most of this disc. It's almost as if Burnett turned up the gothic horror to a Tim Burton soundtrack and planted it down in the South.

Clark's "Through the Morning, Through the Night," gets more than an honest reading, the harmony between the two bleeds into one soft cushion that hugs the melody. And is honest and bitterly romantic. Wait's "Trampled Rose" gets another great reading, with Krauss howling just above a thumping beat. "Killing The Blues" gives Plants voice such softness and lilt that for some reason it reminds me of vintage Righteous Brothers.

The disc is excellent, and so far is my running for album of the year. They have taped an episode for CMT Crossroads and they have both stated that they are more than willing to work with each other again. And I will be marking off those days as well on my calendar. A gem of an album from two amazing singers with extremely rare gifts.
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93 of 109 people found the following review helpful By R. Kyle TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 31, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A self-named "Led Head" friend of mine told me about this CD. His thoughts were that the world as we knew it was coming to end when Robert Plant joined up with a 'country musician'. Having somewhat more eclectic tastes--I didn't think so.

What a treat to open the CD and hear "Rich Woman" on Halloween. A.D.D's headliner review gives the best description of the Southern Gothic 'feel'.

Another particularly eerie song is "Fortune Teller," where Plant sings the tale of a young man who goes to a fortune teller and discovers that he will fall in love with the first woman he sees--which turns out to be the Fortune Teller herself--now he's happy as can be and he gets his fortune told for free. (Yup, corny as KS--but the sound is very cool!)

For the most part, the music will probably suit Alison Krauss fans more than Plant's, but Plant's fans need to listen--just to hear how strong the man can be on soft music.

The best of any profession are the people who raise the bar for the rest. The test of a great collaborative work is -- is the whole better than the sum of its parts? Plant, Krauss, and Burnett started out at the top of their respective forms, but this CD is truly a masterwork among their individual collections, too. "Raising Sand" is going to open the door for a long more mind-bending work.
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71 of 89 people found the following review helpful By B. Niedt on November 8, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Much has been made of this "odd couple" pairing, but it's not all that surprising when one considers the gradual mellowing of Robert Plant's work. Moreover, he has dabbled in folk and country even as far back as his Led Zeppelin days. (Remember his duet with Fairport Convention's Sandy Denny on "Battle of Evermore"?) So his weathered tenor is actually a fine fit with Alison Krauss' Appalachian soprano. It's a successful collaboration, yet I can't help but compare it with Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris' excellent 2006 duet album, "All the Roadrunning", and unfortunately, to me "Raising Sand" comes up a little short. Whereas the Knopfler/Harris coupling was bright, slick and mostly upbeat, the Plant/Krauss team seems mostly more subdued, and there's only the rare spark of musical energy throughout the album. "Gone Gone Gone" is about as lively as they get, and it's a winner, a fun and rocking tune which was the advance single for this CD. Plant stands out on the cover of the rock-n'-roll chestnut "Fortune Teller", too, but other than those two tracks, things are often just a little too mellow. Not that there's anything really wrong with that, but I just expected a little more rockin', or at least a little more s**t-kicking bluegrass, from this pair.
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