Rapa Nui 1994 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(57) IMDb 6.4/10
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The thrilling saga of two Easter Islanders whose rivalry over a woman lead to a competition that will decide leadership of their people.

Starring:
Jason Scott Lee, Esai Morales
Runtime:
1 hour, 47 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Rapa Nui

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Adventure, Action
Director Kevin Reynolds
Starring Jason Scott Lee, Esai Morales
Supporting actors Sandrine Holt, Eru Potaka Dewes, Emilio Tuki Hito, Gordon Hatfield, Frenxa Reuben, Hori Ahipene, Chiefy Elkington, Ruihana Rewa, George Henare, Rawiri Paratene, Pete Smith, Mario Gaoa, Cliff Curtis, Willie Davis, Lawrence Makoare, Te Whatanui Skipwith, Nathaniel Lees, Grant McFarland
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Movie plot and action and acting very good.
Gerald Midkiff
There is a also a love story and the race to become the tribe who wins the birdman competition.
S. Hoats
The dvd transfer of this movie was great and it played perfect in my Blu-ray player.
Cabhan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Mythic tale of what life might have been like for the inhabitants of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) long before the coming of the white man. 'Rapa Nui' means, "navel of the world," a concept found at the basis of every archaic, shamanistic based society. Rapa Nui is a tale of young love fighting against the political, religious and social constraints of life at "the center." (SPOILER ALERT!) Noro (Jason Scott Lee) is a long-ear, a member of the tribal upperclass and the Grandson of the tribal chief. He is in love with Ramana (Sandrine Holt), a short-ear and member of the lowerclass of laborers responsible for the carving of the monolithic statues required by the religious elite.

The chief agrees to let his grandson break the taboo and marry his true love if he enters and wins a yearly intertribal competition which would bestow upon the chief the coveted "Birdman' title for the eighteenth time. It's a dangerous endeavor and he would be competing against many who would do whatever it takes to win. He will also be competing against Make (Esai Morales) his childhood friend who must win, or die. He agrees to his Grandfather's conditions and enters the race. Thus the adventure begins.

While the great day of competition approaches the aging, mentally degenerating chief dreams of a destiny of sailing away on the great white spirit canoe to the "Home of the Gods." When a giant iceberg appears in the bay at the very moment the competition ends he believes his day has arrived and has his warriors canoe him out to the ice block. As he floats away to his death he calls out to those who refused to join him, "What did you think salvation would look like?

Wonderful movie that is virtually unknown in the U.S.A., and is only available in a all-region import edition.
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34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Paul J. Lang on August 19, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
I spent a year on Easter Island (Rapa Nui)in service to the United States. The people were very friendly and willing to talk about their island. The movie was relatively accurate concerning their past, including the cannibalism. If you lived on an island that is roughly 9 by 16 miles and that island had been deciminated by ecological ignorance, cannibalism might seem like a good idea at some point. It was not a continuing thing. The movie was Hollywoodized for entertainment purposes but was well done and the scenery was very familiar. There were two distinct races and they were the long ears and the short ears. Generally archeologist feel that one race was Polynesian and the other was South American indian. The long ears were generally exterminated in the civil war. Places were accurately named. The statues were carved on the sides of Rana Raraku(S?) and the bird men spent much of their time on the larger volcano called Rana Kao(S?) Once a year the stalwarts of the island did race to "Bird Man's Island" to bring back an egg. I believe it was for the glory and special treatment the winner recieved for the following year. I enjoyed the movie thoroughly.-----PJ
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 14, 1998
Format: VHS Tape
I'm becoming a Kevin Reynolds fan. The Beast is his 1988 war epic, beautifully done and under appreciated. Rapa Nui is in that league, an epic story set on Easter Island, isle of the gigantic stone statues. The premise is simple: There are two groups on the island: the dominant Long-Ears, and the subervient Short-Ears. The former have the latter carving out the huge stone statues, to assuage the gods, and to preserve the tenuous balance of life on the island. Jason Scott Lee is the grandson of the ailing leader of the Long-Ears, and is the ostensible candidate to replace him. Before any change in leadership can occur, one man from each Long-Ear tribe has to compete in a swimming race to capture and retrieve the eggs from an actic tern's nest, situated on a small island offshore. What makes Rapa Nui so gripping is its completeness in its depiction of life on that Island. It's clear that Reynolds and Tim Rose Price read Thor Heyerdahl's exhaustive study of the island. The writing isn't the greatest, but the movie moves along, with a great Steward Copeland score set to lush cinematography. Rapa Nui works as an adventure story, a romance, and a sly attack on government by theocracy. Definitely worth renting. END
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lisa A. Leone on January 21, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
I don't think this is a historically accurate account of Easter Island, which has perplexed historians for a long time, but I still think it's worth seeing as a thought exercise. The Moai raise lots of questions and this film gives a possible explanation.
The most compelling aspect of the film (other than the breathtaking scenery) is the struggle between the two "tribes" as exemplified by Esai Morales' character and the ordeals he faces as a proud and fierce member of the lesser tribe, which is made to work in service of the ruling tribe. You can feel Esai's pain to be in service to those who are destroying the land that they must live upon. Imagine putting all of your energy into a pursuit that you're not sure will pay off, but that you're sure is destroying you...
I recommend this film to anyone who is interested in other cultures, especially so-called primitive cultures, and broadening his or her prespective of the world we live in. It won't give you the answers, but it will help you form more questions. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that the love story was perhaps too convenient.
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