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6 Reviews
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saint Malo is a Great Lite Game, July 17, 2013
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This review is from: Saint Malo Strategy Game (Toy)
A lot of people don't like dice rolling games. Too much luck or not enough skill, they say. P-shah, I say. Life involves luck, so why not have it in your board games as well. If you have played Roll Through the Ages or Yahtzee Free for All and have enjoyed those games, you will love Saint Malo. It's not a heavy Euro game; in fact, it is quite lite, but that doesn't take anything away from it. The decision making you have to make as you make the dice rolls and try to balance what you want against what you need, in conjunction with having make decisions about where you will place your "people" on the board make this a challenging and fun game. Easy to teach, you can learn the rules in about 5 minutes, and before you know it you are drawing on your game board to reflect the purchases from your dice roll outcomes. That's right, you get to write on your individualized game board with erasable markers. At the end you just take a cloth and wipe off the game board and you are ready to play another one. Playable as easily by two people by as many as five, friends and family have really enjoyed this one. I have found that it is enjoyable by both gamers and non-gamers, so I can heartily endorse this one.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun strategy/dice game, June 21, 2014
This review is from: Saint Malo Strategy Game (Toy)
Saint Malo is a port town on the English Channel coast of France. It is a walled medieval city that was home to both pirates and legitimate sea merchants. In this game, each player builds up the city by constructing walls, churches, and houses and by recruiting various citizens. Each player starts with three coins, two logs, and some crates in their city, which is represented by individual dry erase boards.

The main mechanic of the game is rolling five dice with six different symbols--log, crate, wall, church, person, and pirate.All are useful except the pirate. The player may re-roll as many dice as he or she likes two times, trying to keep enough of an individual symbol to get something really valuable. The player can only trade in one symbol to add something to the city. If the five dice show two walls, two persons, and a church, the player can either (1) add two walls to their city or (2) choose between a soldier and a priest (either costs two persons) or (3) build a simple church. The player then draws symbols on the individual dry erase board to show their choice. Placement is important.

The rules about what players can do is a little complicated because of the five different symbols and how many dice came up with the symbol. Walls, crates, and logs are straightforward--players add one to their board for every dice rolled (logs have the additional requirement of paying two coins for delivery). Churches are built with different values (from one to five) written inside them. Many different people can be recruited depending on how many dice are rolled. Luckily, the main board provides a "cheat sheet" listing who can be chosen.

The main board also tracks how many pirates are rolled. Once a row is filled, the pirates attack and any city that doesn't have enough defenses (measured in how many soldiers and full walls the city has) loses one of the cannons at the top of the city, which is negative five points at the end of the game per cannon.

The game ends when the first player completely fills his or her city's area. Everyone gets an equal number of turns so a few more players could have a last chance to finish their city. Scores are totaled and whoever has the most points wins.

The game is fun but play can feel a bit like solitaire. Interaction is minimal though a player might try to rush the game to an end before everyone else is ready. Even if you don't win, it's fun to look at what's been built over the game.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good game overall, March 5, 2014
By 
thedude (Knoxville, TN USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saint Malo Strategy Game (Toy)
Pros: very little set up time required, fairly in depth strategy involved, finite play time

Cons: complicated to teach to new players, churches may be a little unbalanced

Summary: My family are big Settlers of Catan fans. But I was looking for a strategy game that wasn't quite so involved. I chose Saint Malo because my wife and I visited the town during our honeymoon and because it sounded interesting. All in all, Saint Malo is quick to set up, requires a fair amount of strategy, and does not drag on forever like Settlers can.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Yahtzee with a back story, February 2, 2014
By 
Rob L (boston, ma) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saint Malo Strategy Game (Toy)
I really like this game! If you want to boil it down for someone (especially if they aren't a huge gamer) then you could describe it as Yahtzee with a story built around it. That would be selling it short a bit, because Saint Malo has more complexity as well.

But the basic game play is the same: roll five dice up to three times, keeping the ones you like along the way. As your turns progress, you want to build up different categories, but instead of straights, you build churches of increasing size, instead of Yahtzee you build a noble. From there, Saint Malo adds layers of complexity. Certain categories build upon others (logs are needed for houses) and others work together as score multipliers (jugglers score two points for each different type of person they are built placed next to).

On top of it all is the ever-increasing threat from pirates, and the constant decision of when to protect against them (by building walls and soldiers).

It adds up to a fun, and fairly lightweight, strategy game. It has an easy learning curve, and you can pretty much jump right in and figure it out as you go. Games probably take around 15-45 minutes, depending on number of players and how much explaining you do along the way. Just like Yahtzee itself, Saint Malo has a high replay value, and it has that gambler's appeal... just one more roll and I'll be there!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great family game that is easy to learn, January 30, 2014
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This review is from: Saint Malo Strategy Game (Toy)
This is a fairly easy game to learn that is a lot of fun for the whole family. Felt tip markers are cheap
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great games, October 3, 2013
This review is from: Saint Malo Strategy Game (Toy)
Watch [...] for more information about the game, after watching the video you ready to play the game. Good price.
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Saint Malo Strategy Game
Saint Malo Strategy Game by Ravensburger
$35.99 $25.90
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