Customer Reviews

213
4.6 out of 5 stars
Ravensburger Enchanted Forest - Family Game
Price:$18.71 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

149 of 149 people found the following review helpful
on November 16, 1999
My daughter has loved this game since she was six years old. The craftsmanship of the game itself is beautiful. The game-pieces and the little trees are wooden, and the illustrations are of the old-fashioned fairytale variety, very intricate and colourful. The cards are good,thick cardboard and will stand up to years of use. It looks like a very old game that one would find in an attic trunk. Winning depends on such a variety of strategy, memory, and just plain luck that a combination of ages can play concurrently and feel equally challenged. I recommend The Enchanged Forest highly. It is a feast of colours, a delight to behold and touch, and it provides good mental exercise.What more could you ask?
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
166 of 168 people found the following review helpful
on November 25, 1999
I am a child psychologist, and this game has been a fixture in my office for 15 years. It promotes concentration and working memory, imagination, and a fun competitiveness devoid of aggression. What I find helpful is that the rules of the game are easily adapted to suit different age groups. An outstanding game.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
63 of 66 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2007
The good King is looking for someone to take over the Throne as he has no children. He has decided to ask people to locate magic treasure to prove their worth.

The board is made up of twisting and branching paths that lead from the village, through the forest, and into the castle. Cards are used to determine what the King is looking for. The card has a scene from a popular fairy tale and a picture of the desired object. Players move their pieces through the forest looking for trees. Each of the tree pieces has a treasure hidden under it. Players landing on a tree get to secretly look at the treasure. Once they know where the desired treasure is, they can head to the castle to tell the King. The first player to successfully find three desired treasures wins the game.

Magic can also be used in the game. On certain rolls of the dice, players can teleport to any tree of their choosing, go to the castle gate, or randomly change the desired treasure card. Movement is a little different than in most games. Two dice are used but they are not added. For instance, a roll of a 5 and a 4 can get you nine spaces along but it can also get you five spaces in one direction and four in another. In this way a 4 and a 5 can be used to move one space. Thus subtraction skills become as important as addition skills. While my two kids love the game (ages four and seven) it has elements that make it palatable to the adult as well. Check it out.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
This is definitely a game that my daughter will grow in to. She's just a little more than 4, so we have modified this game to be more cooperative and yield faster rewards, and it is our absolute favorite.

For parents of 4-5's who might be interested, we have made the following modifications:
* We play 2 at a time and it's mainly cooperative with some competition thrown in (mostly hooting, hollering, racing) with a much faster tempo (game done in 20 mins).
* Our rules are a blend of Junior Labyrinth, Memory, Sorry, and I Spy (other games that she loves and plays well on her own without help).
* Child wants to win but needs help with strategy at times.

The modifications:
1. We move as instructed with the dice. Doubles get you to a tree or straight to the key (to cut down on some of the hassle of landing on the key, which can drag on and on).
2. When you land on a tree, you show everyone the treasure that you found (like Memory). Both of us work together to pattern the trees into our memory, and we work as a team to get to and identify the different tree-treasures.
3. Then we basically are racing to the key via doubles or dice rolls to try to claim whatever treasure card is showing and helping each other either remember or try to figure out which of the "unseen" treasures it might be.
4. Whoever gets to the key gets to try to remember where the treasure card was (we help each other).
5. If you win the card, you take both the card and the tree for your "treasure area" (again, like Memory or I Spy) and go back to the village to "start again." Of course, if you roll a double on your next turn, you can choose to go to either a tree or right back to the key to claim your next treasure.
6. The person with the with the most treasures at the end wins (like Memory or I Spy). She usually beats me by 2 cards, and has a wonderful time doing it.

We did play a "real" game tonight and the first card really stumped everyone, so folks had seen all the trees, then forgotten them, because we forgot that a double could change the treasure card. 40 minutes in, only I had 2 cards, Dad had been sent back to the village, daughter was dancing around the room. Went back to modified play and she had a great time playing 2 more rounds.

There are a number of things that I love about this game:
1. As described above, this game has loads of potential so it can be modified to be faster/more cooperative/easier for kids all the way down to 4 years of age.
2. It's Ravensburger, which means that you are getting really excellent quality game, with nice pieces, a beautiful playing board, strategy, etc. I can see this game lasting a really long time.
3. She is going to grow into it over time--as opposed to growing out of it over time. Many "kid" games are for such a narrow age range, say 5-7 years, and I find that the 4 & 5 year olds memorize the plays really quickly and a lot of the games can become boring or just too easy. (I Spy, while loads of fun, is enjoying a retirement for this reason, until everyone "forgets" the memorized game cards; Operation is just too one-dimensional.

Super game, thrilled.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
on January 10, 2008
Verified Purchase
This is a beautiful, well thought out, strategic game. Ravensburger is such a great German (I believe) company for beautiful, durable, mentally stimulating games. I used to buy my own daughter (now 25) their toys at the Early Learning Center (since gone out of business) years ago and was thrilled to find them through Amazon to purchase gifts for my niece and nephew. I cannot explain what a great time my niece and I had playing the Enchanted Forest (over and over). As you read the instructions you realize the Ravensburger people thought about every little detail that could have made game play tedious or lengthy and you realize that they truly thought of everything to make it enjoyable. My niece is 8 yrs old and a bright student and we thoroughly enjoyed playing this 3 times in a row. Average game play is about 1/2 an hour (maybe it would be longer with more players). Retention and strategy are important, but it is still simple enough that they will not become annoyed. The little trees that are placed around the board (with the secret treasures hidden underneath) are absolutely precious and well made, as is the board itself (beautiful artwork)and the playing cards (no flimsy thin cards that will rip in a few weeks) but nice thick sturdy cards. If you think this game is pricey, wait till you and your child receive it, how pleased you will be and once you play, you'll realize what a bargain it is. This is one to be passed down to the next child in the family. It was very nice to read the child psychologist's review and know it is used in therapy.

Irene, Caldwell, NJ
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
56 of 62 people found the following review helpful
on May 3, 2000
The Enchanted Forest was my favorite game as a child, and I can still vividly remember it as an adult. The illustrations and board design have an old-world, "once-upon-a-time" feeling, and the wooden playing pieces enhance the fairy tale image. I thought that I would never again see this unique game, and I am thrilled that it is still available. Buy this game and you, too, will be enchanted!
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on February 9, 2011
Verified Purchase
I bought it based only on the reviews, so when it arrived I wasn't sure how it would go over. My two kids - almost 5yrs and almost 7yrs - have been playing it every day for a month and a half, at least once a day - and I don't see it stopping any time soon. It does take a while, but they never seem to tire of it. We've also created our own version of playing on teams so that kids and adults can play together evenly. It requires concentration, memory, thinking of your next move - all things that are hard to find in board games for younger kids. This isn't your Candyland type of game (I've played enough of that game to last me a lifetime) so I'm really enjoying having this one around!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on March 7, 2011
Verified Purchase
I got this game for my son's 5th birthday and so far we are really enjoying it. The style of gameplay is such that it is simple enough for younger children to grasp quickly, but nuanced enough that if the older kids and adults want to scheme and strategize a bit more they can do that as well. A bit of luck, a touch of planning, and a lot of fun.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
I'm an avid gamer who basically has no one to play with except my soon-to-be five-year-old son. As this limits the kinds of games I can play, I have to find things that will work for my son but not bore the crap out of me. With the exception of puzzles, I've found that my son doesn't tend to have a lot of focus and needs his attention grabbed. Thus, a game such as Rivers, Rails, and Roads (which I personally like) is a complete bust for him whereas Whac-A-Mole, Candy Land, Chutes and Ladders (Marvel Superheroes version), Aggravation, The Ladybug Game, and Animal Bingo all have a hook that appeals to him.

So when I received Enchanted Forest as a gift, I was unsure how he would respond to it. Thankfully, he enjoyed it because I did as well. Essentially, it's a memory game. There are a bunch of little green trees that have a symbol hidden on the bottom. You have to move around the board discovering what those symbols are and remembering which tree had which symbol. On the castle space sits a deck of cards. Each of those cards corresponds to one of the symbols beneath the trees. At the start of the game, a card is turned up and your goal is to find out which tree is hiding that symbol and then move to a special space within the castle. Once on that space, you must declare which tree held that symbol. If you are correct, you keep that card. If the guess is incorrect (only the person making the guess is initially allowed to verify - if correct, the player must show everyone else the symbol), you go back to start. The first player who obtains three cards wins.

First, the game is engaging for my son. He likes the pictures, and he's able to count out the spaces. Sometimes he has difficulty keeping the information he obtains from looking beneath the trees to himself, but I'm usually able to keep him in line. Second, the game is challenging enough for me so that I am not bored. There are a lot of trees, and they aren't in tidy rows. If I don't work too hard to try and remember exactly where everything is at, it works better since that puts me closer to my son's level. He remembers some of them, but they pop out of his head quickly enough.

There are really only two issues that we experienced. The first is that the game can take a while, especially if I am not working exceptionally hard to win. The second problem is that if I were to work exceptionally hard to win, I would crush him. I don't mind beating him in games (though he really hates to lose) from time to time so long as I make sure it's close. This is how we resolved these two issues: in regards to keeping it close, I must avoid landing on a space he occupies, thus sending him back to the start. Also, when I correctly identify a tree and take the card, I automatically go back to the start space. The rules allow for you to squat and make a guess on your next turn for the new card if you claimed the previous card. If I go around the entire board and memorize where everything is at, I could get to the castle and claim three cards on three successive turns, which wouldn't be any fun for my son. So I'm not allowed to do that. Also, as I said before, I don't work too hard to remember where everything is at. Another thing I do is help him with strategy, otherwise he might meander around forever.

In regards to the other issue I mentioned, the length of time it takes to play the game, we resolved it this way: when it got to the point that he wanted to quit (we were playing on the floor, which is not carpeted, so we were both getting tired of sitting on the floor - of course, we could have played elsewhere, which might have helped), he had two cards, and I had two cards. So, we decided that we would just make guesses in regards to the location of the symbol of the upturned card until someone wins. I let him take first guess, and then I guessed. As I actually had no idea where this symbol was at, I didn't have to fudge. I think we each took three guesses, at which point I picked the correct tree and claimed the winning card.

In a way, this game reminds me of another game that we both enjoy: The Secret Door. That, too, is a memory game, though a cooperative one (sort of a Memory meets Clue). So perhaps my son likes memory games.

Anyway, if moving around a board remembering where stuff is at sounds like fun to you, I would highly recommend picking this one up.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on January 10, 2007
I had this game when I was younger, so I bought it for my 10 year old daughter who loves games. She loves it! My other daughters play it as well, and the youngest is 5 and plays it easily. They have so much fun playing the game that they really don't mind who wins, which is rare with my competitive ones.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 5 answered questions

     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed


Catan: Junior
Catan: Junior by Mayfair Games
$27.00
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.