Qty:1
  • List Price: $40.00
  • Save: $14.31 (36%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Raw: The Uncook Book: New Vegetarian Food for Life Hardcover – April 27, 1999


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$25.69
$14.57 $2.73
Paperback
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

Raw: The Uncook Book: New Vegetarian Food for Life + RAWvolution: Gourmet Living Cuisine + Raw Food/Real World: 100 Recipes to Get the Glow
Price for all three: $74.68

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Regan Books; 1 edition (April 27, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060392622
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060392628
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 8.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (176 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #96,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Gourmet raw cuisine"--if that sounds like an oxymoron, you'll be amazed by the creativity of the recipes in this book. Every food is "live" (uncooked) in these vegetarian recipes from Juliano, the raw-food guru of Los Angeles. Juliano believes that fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, beans, and seeds in their rawest and purest form are the most nourishing foods. If your imagination stops at alfalfa sprouts and grated carrots, hold onto your cutting board. Juliano's recipes include Butternut Squash Soup, New Moon Fruit Stew, Thai Green Papaya Salad, Living Buckwheat Pizza Crust, Mango Essene Bread, Mock Salmon Sushi, Raw Spring Rolls, seven varieties of burritos, nine varieties of pizza, and nine unusual smoothies. Desserts? Try EZ Pudding (made with maple syrup, avocados, and carob powder) or Cashew Gelato (cashew butter, maple syrup, and almonds, served frozen). There are also condiments, dressings, and sauces, and plenty of information about preparing raw foods, including how to soak and sprout beans, grains, seeds, and nuts.

It may seem like cheating, but a food dehydrator is permitted to "bake" pizza, cookies, and breads. It blows hot air, but never heats foods hotter than 120°F, which, claims Juliano, "allows all the delicate nutrients that are usually burned out of cooked foods to remain intact." Raw is filled with gorgeous color photos of the foods in all their vibrant colors and a number of photos of the vibrant Juliano (not in the raw). "Before you know it," says Juliano, "you'll be Raw and loving it." --Joan Price

Review

"Food fads come and go, Pan Asian, Haute Southern, Pacific Rim fusion, but the latest dining trends is actually the oldest: eating food raw." -- USA Today

"Juliano is the toast of Hollywood, somewhere between a chef and a guru. The food is spectacular, lush, colorful and tactile, he's more than a chef, he's an inspiration." --Spin


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Great Book, easy to read recipes, beautiful color pictures.
Barry Houck
So many of the recipes require SO MUCH work... and ingredients that are just too hard to find anywhere.
JohnnyT
For those that wish to give this raw gourmet book a go, I highly recommend it.
Belinda B

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

606 of 627 people found the following review helpful By Groovy Vegan VINE VOICE on February 11, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I'm new to raw foods "cooking", so I'll start with the first salad in Juliano's "Raw". Let's see, the ingredients include: anise hyssop, borage, bronze fennel, chickweed, meadow rue... What the heck is meadow rue? Let's check the glossary, "a delicious leaf"...Thanks Juliano. I'll also need mizuna, salad burnet, society garlic and summer purslane. I've heard of some of these items, but I've never seen them in Seattle natural markets, and Seattle's a very vegetarian cuisine savvy city. Unless you can grow these things yourself, good luck finding them. I must admit that despite the fact that I prepare food from scratch quite a bit, I found Juliano's recipes too complicated and under-explained to attempt a single one. Other raw foods "cookbooks" explain raw foods prep in considerably more detail, such as "Warming Up to Living Foods" by Elysa Markowitz, and "Sproutman's Kitchen Garden Cookbook" by Steve Meyerowitz.
Juliano writes that the purpose of the book is to introduce or reacquaint the reader to raw foods, and to provide the tools to eat this way. Unfortunately, I'm not sure Julanio succeeds in these goals, although he certainly gave himself a nice modeling portfolio. Since most readers will be unfamiliar with raw foods, he needs to provide more guidance than most cookbooks in what are the ingredients, how to shop for them, the kitchen equipment needed, and how to prepare the foods. The guidance is too sparse and at times inadequate in these areas. A few of the many examples of inadequate instruction:
* Many recipes require a dehydrator, yet there's zero guidance on how to select one.
*Several recipes call for "coconut meat", such as the carrot cake which calls for 2 cups. Approximately how many coconuts will I need to buy or find on the beach to yield 2 cups?
Read more ›
17 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
167 of 177 people found the following review helpful By neuroscientist on February 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Overall, this is a great book. It's inspiring and fun, and the food doesn't get much healthier. I've really gotten into the book during the last couple of weeks, and most of the recipes I've tried are very good. You don't need all of the ingredients he lists, so don't be afraid to omit or substitute. I do not yet have a dehyrator, and my oven doesn't go below 170 degrees, but I have been able to test some of the bread-type recipes. They're very good. Actually, everything has been very good so far (especially the milkshake!), except the Butternut Squash Soup. I found I just don't like raw butternut squash.
If you are on a low calorie or lowfat diet, be aware of these things:
1-There is no calorie information. Once I calculated the calories for the Cashew Gelato, I found out why! It was enough for a whole day's calories for anybody. But it really looks like ice cream.
2-Many recipes use nuts, dates, orange juice, olive oil, avocados, and maple syrup. I think that keeping the avocados in any diet is a good idea, though. Flax seeds show up a lot, too, but they are highly beneficial and don't seem to always get digested, if you know what I mean!
3-Juliano's "butter" is olive oil with salt. He says, "Slap an extra slab of 'butter' on everything! You can eat all you want and get what olive oil promotes most: healthier hair and skin and better circulation." Easy for him to say. He's already skinny.
About the orange juice-it shows up everywhere. He combines it with things I never would have thought of. However, he usually lists low calorie substitutes. And he never claimed this was a diet book!
I found sprouting to be surprisingly easy, but his chart for sprouting and soaking times is incomplete.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
132 of 140 people found the following review helpful By Laura Dilley on December 29, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I had the enviable opportunity of dining at Juliano's restaurant in San Francisco this past summer. Being new to raw foods, I was not sure what to expect. The food was absolutely delicious, out-of-this-world, and beautifully presented. The textures and flavors were amazing. The experience inspired me to learn more about raw foods and to put _Raw: The Uncook Book_ at the top of my Christmas list. Luckily, I did get this as a present, and I made one of the recipes this evening. It turned out great! My sense of the recipes is that many are somewhat complicated in that they cross-reference other recipes, but that you can take short-cuts to "ease into" this cuisine if you don't have time to do everything. Ultimately I believe Juliano's claim in the introduction that with a little practice, raw food preparation takes less time than cooked food prep. Finally, the majority of ingredients are not that exotic and easily obtainable in most regions. The book is filled with humor and beautiful color photographs. I highly recommend it!
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Firecracker on November 26, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The colorful photos and imagination of ingredient components that put together this wonderful work of food art called an uncook book is worth 4 stars. RAW is indeed worthy of coffee table status. Each recipe appears to be indescribably delicious and full of adventure to the chef looking for a challenge.
One such recipe, Hummus a L'orange was gold. I've prepared raw sprouted hummus before and the taste was never very desireable, yet Juliano's version with the addition of cashews, miso, amongst other obscure ingredients and exotic spices has turned this ordinary dish into a festival for the tastebuds.
The falafel patties were more of a dissapoinment to me. Since this recipe also required sprouted chickpeas, I made it alongside the hummus recipe. The high percentage of salt called for in this recipe was overkill, leaving the main ingredients without a note of possibility in taste. Suggestion: if you must use salt, add at the end and a little bit at a time. Juliano's intentions for the high amounts of sodium chloride (present in both sea and table salt) is understandably to impress upon the palate of a cooked food eater.
Since many of the recipes within this book are multi-stepped, and some requiring other recipes within his book, they appear to be meant for company or pot luck type functions, rather than simple meals a raw eater could throw together to enjoy by his raw self. In other words, if you are a begninner in the kitchen, RAW will prove quite a challenge for you.
Yet many recipes DO seem easy to put together, like the soups, salads, and some of the drinks, and as long as you have all the ingredients or good substitutions on hand, you are good to go. Good-quality blenders and knives are a necessity for most of these.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search