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Razorback

4.2 out of 5 stars 83 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

It's no cute koala munching eucalyptus leaves. It's a rhino-sized denizen of the Outback that can turn you into a blood-feast. Out of a wasteland of beauty and death comes Razorback, tensely directed by Russell Mulcahy (Highlander) and ominously shot by Dean Semler (the Mad Max cinematographer who won an Academy Award for Dances with Wolves). Gregory Harrison plays a nai?ve American arriving down under to look for his missing wife. Unequipped for the rough landscape and unprepared for the horrors lurking within, he is soon battling to survive. Amid the hanging carcasses of the Pet Pak cannery, he confronts the monstrous creature while a
conveyor belt inches man and beast toward razor-sharp blades that will make pet food out of one - or both.

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Special Features

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Product Details

  • Actors: Gregory Harrison, Arkie Whiteley, Bill Kerr, Chris Haywood, David Argue
  • Directors: Russell Mulcahy
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Anchor Bay
  • DVD Release Date: November 11, 2009
  • Run Time: 95 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (83 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002WJHBE0
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,069 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Razorback" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
Razorback (Russell Mulcahy, 1984)
I actually rented this looking to see if it contained a long sample from a song of the same name by the band Terror Organ. (It does.) I was expecting it to be another godawful piece of made-for-TV Aussie cinema that ignores Australian film history since, and perhaps before, On the Beach; what I got was a pleasant surprise, to say the least. This was Mulcahy’s first big-screen feature, but film fans will recognize the name as the guy who directed Highlander, Ricochet, and (ironically) the recent TV adaptation of On the Beach; Razorback contains a number of the elements that have made his films above average ever since.
As it is with, seemingly, all Australian films of the past forty years, the first thing most people are going to notice about Razorback is the stunning cinematography, which was obvious even on a well-used videocassette. Whatever they’re doing down under in the growing of their cinematographers, they’re doing it right. The second thing is Mulcahy’s use of light and darkness, comparable to that of David Lynch or David Fincher; the man knows what he’s doing when his characters are holding flashlights.
The story itself is somewhat amusing; an old, isolationist farmer, Jake Cullen (Bill Kerr of “Garry Halliday” fame), has his house attacked and his grandson carried off by a giant, insane razorback hog. He attempts to convince the people who live in his small outback town of the danger they’re in, but no one believes him, including an animal activist from America, Beth Winters (Judy Morris). When Winters goes missing, her husband Carl (the ubiquitous Gregory Harrison, who has been in every TV miniseries made in the past ten years) heads to Australia to look for her.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Fun Australian monster movie about a giant razorback pig that kills a man's infant grandson and destroys his home in the opening sequence--since nobody else has ever seen a razorback that large everyone believes the man killed his grandson (including his daughter) but there isn't enough evidence to bring charges.

Some time later an American animal rights crusader turns up in the same town to do a story on kangaroo slaughter. After driving off without her cameraman to do some scouting she makes the spectacularly stupid decision to drive to the plant where kangaroos and god knows what else are mashed up by giant machines, turning it all into dog food. She gets chased away, drives in the wrong direction while making her escape and is nearly raped by two men from the plant. The rape is interrupted by an attack from the giant razorback that nobody believes exists. The men escape but leave the female reporter behind for the monster to take care off.

The reporter's husband comes to Australia posing as a tourist to try and find out what happened to his wife, not revealing his true identity.

Razorback has much going for it--it was the feature debut for director Russel Mulcahy, then best known for directing music videos for Duran Duran and The Tubes. His next feature was the far more successful and well-known Highlander. Razorback might still be Mulcahy's best film--it's directed with a surplus of style that sometimes feels like a child giddy with the contents of his new toy-box--Mulcahy would never quite capture Razorback's combination of style, energy and pure film-making joy ever again. Razorback also boasts a script by genre specialist Everett De Roche who also wrote the scripts for Long Weekend, Patrick and Road Games, all of which are classics.
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Format: DVD
Razorback is arguably the greatest film ever made about a giant,wild,smart,killer pig with a taste for human flesh.Arguably.All kidding aside if you like horror movies about monster animals with a cool tongue-in-cheek attitude, but with some truly exciting moments (think Alligator)I believe you will get a kick out of this flick.The movie was obviously made on the cheap,but with talent and imagination much like another incredible Australian indie Mad Max.
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Format: DVD
'Razorback', apart from 'Return of Captain Invincible' and maybe 'Performance', is likely the cultest film ever made.
Its credentials are crackling; mad, bad killer pig, desert lunatics, animal rights protesters, camels, abattoirs, negligible special effects, arty direction, and a delicious ideal of senseless cruelty and insensitivity.

''Jaws' in the outback' just about sums it up, but with notable additions. It has two of the bestest, grotesque villains ever portrayed on film.
Benny and Dicko work at the extremely unpleasant Petpak Cannery, a big, clanking, kangaroo slaughterhouse, around which, much of 'Razorback's action occurs. They enjoy their work WAY too much, live in a cave underneath the plant and insist on 'mystery bags' for their nutritional essentials.

Into their environment bristles Carl Winters in a borrowed old banger, looking for his missing eco-journalist wife Beth. Benny and Dicko know what happened to her but tell him porkies. He goes 'roo hunting with the rinds and is so enamoured with the proceedings, he vomits on their heads! Yet again; every-one's a critic.

After a WILD trippy walkabout, he begins to realise the ghastly truth - there's a giant pig making salami out of the locals. From there on it's a battle between the (happily vicious!) titular giant gammon and the small band of good apples, loins girded and resolute;
Carl, Jake Cullen, a local ham-hammerer who's grandson was smoked by the beast, and research scientist Sarah - (played by lovely, died-MUCH-too-soon Arkie Whitely)- each with a very different point to prove.

Intellectually (mercifully) 'Razorback' doesn't exist. Director Russell Mulcahy hogs the kudos for this.
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