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Re-Engage! American and the World after Bush; An Informed Citizen's Guide Paperback – May 30, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Paradigm Publishers (May 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594515522
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594515521
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5.2 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,271,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Helena Cobban is a columnist for the Christian Science Monitor and a contributing writer at the Boston Review. She has also written several books, including The Moral Architecture of World Peace (University of Virginia Press 2000), The Superpowers and the Syrian-Israeli Conflict (Praeger Publishers 1991) and The Making of Modern Lebanon (Hutchinson 1985).

More About the Author

Helena Cobban, born 1952, is a British-American writer and researcher on international relations, with special interests in the Middle East, the international system, and transitional justice.

Ms. Cobban was educated at St. Hugh's College, Oxford, where she received her BA (Hons) in Philosophy and Economics in 1973. She was awarded an MA from Oxford in 1981.

From 1974 through 1981, she worked as a Beirut-based correspondent for news outlets including The Christian Science Monitor, The Sunday Times, ABC News, and the BBC.

In 1982 she moved to the United States to take up a research fellowship at the Harvard University Center for International Affairs, where she wrote her first book, "The Palestinian Liberation Organisation". It was published in English in 1984, was translated into Arabic and several other languages, and remains in print.

Since then she has published six additional books: three others on questions of Middle East war and peace, and three on other international issues. Her seventh book, "Re-engage! American and the World After Bush" was published in 2008. Rep. Lee Hamilton, Co-chair of the Iraq Study Group, described it as, "An impassioned, thought-provoking, and accessible brief from a highly esteemed journalist on how all of us, as individuals, can act to help better our country and world." She has also contributed chapters to around 20 scholarly books edited by others.

From 1990 through 2007, Ms. Cobban contributed a regular column on global issues to "The Christian Science Monitor", and from 1993 through 2006 she contributed a separate column to the Arabic-language international daily "Al-Hayat".

Since February 2003 she has published "Just World News", a blog on global issues that has gained a broad international readership and has been cited in "Le Monde diplomatique" and many other places. She is a Contributing Editor at Boston Review, where she has published essays on Palestinian-Israeli issues, Iraq, and post-conflict justice questions.

In October 2009, Ms. Cobban took up a position as Executive Director of the Council for the National Interest, a Washington DC-based nonprofit organization; she resigned from CNI in February 2010.

She is a member of the Charlottesville, Virginia meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), and has been active in several Quaker organizations. She sits on the Corporation of Haverford College, in Haverford, Pennsylvania.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Fred Shira on April 12, 2010
Format: Paperback
To coin an old country phrase, "George W. Bush left us in a devil of a fix": the economy is in shambles, we have a national debt that defies comprehension, we are involved in two wars which we entered in haphazardly and poorly managed with agenda other than the good of the American people, and an anti-government tone that spreads across the country whipped up by the Republican party and its so called conservatives.
Ms. Cobban sets out to describe the present shape of American and its place in the world. In doing so she, like so many others before her, tries to break down subject/object dualism. Let me explain. Our world view is that each of us are individual beings, subjects, while everything, and every one, outside of ourselves is separate, objects. This is the dominate Christian Dogma. Another world view would be that we are all part of a big whole. We are all connected in one great big soul rather than each having a different and separate soul. This notion is nothing new: the Buddhists see it in their sense of "Oneness", The Gnostic Christians have the idea of "Enlightenment", Emmanuel Kant developed his "Transcendental Ego", Emerson wrote about "The Oversoul", Jung used his notion of "The Collective Unconsciousness" in his work, and William James talked about it in his theory of experience.
"Global Control versus Global Inclusion" is the new paradigm. We as American need to stop seeing the world as something to go out and conquer but as something to circle around and view ourselves as an equal part of a greater whole. It compels us to take care of that "whole" as are taking care of ourselves at the same time. Attacking someone would theoretically be like deliberately shooting yourself in the foot. At bit of a stretch, but think about it.
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