Reaching and Teaching: A Call to Great Commission Obedience and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $2.44 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by SDGRomans1136
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: CLEAN PAGES! NO MARKINGS! Like New except for some minor wear to the cover...will make a very good reading/working copy. Priced to sell...enjoy! +++ I do my best to describe the exact condition of all my items so you know exactly what you are buying...I always try to under-promise and over-deliver. +++ *** I aim at 100% Customer Satisfaction and I know that you will not be disappointed with this item. ***
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Reaching and Teaching: A Call to Great Commission Obedience Paperback – March 17, 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.55
$5.22 $4.20


Frequently Bought Together

Reaching and Teaching: A Call to Great Commission Obedience + The Missionary Call: Find Your Place in God's Plan For the World + Let the Nations Be Glad!: The Supremacy of God in Missions
Price for all three: $41.76

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Moody Publishers; New Edition edition (March 17, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802450296
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802450296
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #562,068 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

M. DAVID SILLS (Belhaven College; New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary; Reformed Theological Seminary) is a professor at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He joined Southern Seminary after serving as a missionary in Ecuador. Dr. Sills is the author of The Missionary Call and two books on the Highland Quichua: Quichuas de la Sierra and Capacitacion Pastoral En La Cultura Quichua. David and his wife, Mary, have two grown children.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
6
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By DocTheology on July 3, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
David Sills has delivered to us a tremendous work about the need to completely fulfill the mission commands of reaching and teaching. I heard once of a group that planted 500 churches in Europe in just 5 years. While planting a church may have a fuzzy definition, the idea that people were reached, elders were mentored and trained, pastors were taught and given depth of knowledge all seems unreal. Yes, God can do anything, but Sills is echoing a call that many mission pastors and missiologists have had...patience in the process. However, unfortunately a lot of missionaries still face home offices that want accounting for number of converts, churches planted, work done, and more. In other words, the issue is not always the missionary but the expectations of those off the field as well as donors.

The conflict I found within the book deals with the conflict of real life and I don't know if it was really answered in this volume. The majority world is composed mostly of oral and narrative people. Passing along Gospel and Bible truth is done from generation to generation through stories and yet that problem is right here when it comes to training pastors. Pastors can pass along oral stories, but theological depth and preparing people for apologetics is not just for the western church. It is not something that just the literate can do. Obviously this was a major factor in the first century and it is today, but while Sills expounds the oral teaching methods I am not sure we have found the final link to putting theological depth in the hearts and minds of people through oral transmission. That is worth a good book and study!
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Lonas on May 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
Christian missions in the last 50-75 years has shifted into overdrive. Since missionaries and missiologists first began realizing that "all the nations" Christ referred to in Matthew 28:19 (panta ta ethne in Greek) had a much broader meaning than simply the geopolitical entities we call countries, the drive to send messengers of the Gospel to every unreached people group on the globe has expanded the Church to never-before-seen levels.

While this explosion of activity has clearly been a God-ordained, Spirit-led movement, M. David Sills in Reaching and Teaching stands up to say, "slow down" to the missionary establishment, calling readers' attention to the full scope of Christ's mandate for the nations. Sills, a former missionary in Ecuador and current professor of Christian missions and cultural anthropology at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky., points out that the fast-track approach to world evangelization often overlooks a key component of the missionary call that is biblically mandated and was historically integrated into mission enterprises--the theological training of national believers.

Sills looks at the state of some of the people groups who have been "reached" and finds that many individuals are falling into heresy, syncretism, and cults because of the lack of adequate training in Scripture and biblical application. He reports that the consistent response to his question for national leaders, "what is your greatest need?" is "more trained pastors."
The foundation of the book's argument is the second part of the Great Commission in Matthew 18:20a, "Teaching them to obey all that I commanded you.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Philip W. Barnes on April 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In an environment obsessed with speed and so-called "best practices" in missions, this book offers a plea for balance -- a call for both reaching AND teaching -- unreached people groups AND harvest fields -- going to the edge AND doing deep discipleship and theological education. The command of Christ is not to reach and leave but to reach and teach.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Molly on June 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
Recently reading this book, Reaching and Teaching, by Dr. Sills, I so wish I would have had the pleasure of encountering it sooner- it has broadened my understanding of the work and call of missions in my own life as well as exhorting current missionaries and agencies "to do more than just reach."

In many missionary circles, it has been the current trend to "evangelize" generically speaking, to share the gospel message with a people group and then pick up camp and go to the next unreached group, share the gospel with them, pick up camp, and move on to... the next unreached people group etc. There is an urgency in this pattern, which Sills does not patronize, but in the midst of this rote system, he questions that while many may hear the good news, what does that people group look like 5 or 10 years from now after the missionaries have gone? Are they still following Jesus? Do they understand the Bible? Is there discipleship? What is the health of the church?

My husband and I are fortunate to see many friends answer the call to missions, and this book prompted me to consider how we can best affect reached people long term and encourage missionaries beyond their initial call. It's through that intentional, life-long sacrifice of equipping and investing. I appreciated Sills insight into the many roles missionaries play, from breaking ground and starting churches, to discipleship and teaching and eventually passing on the ministries to qualified and trained leaders in the native church.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews