I Read It, but I Don't Get It and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$15.87
Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.00
  • Save: $6.13 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

I Read It, but I Don't Get It: Comprehension Strategies for Adolescent Readers Paperback – January 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-1571100894 ISBN-10: 157110089X

Buy New
Price: $15.87
52 New from $10.15 141 Used from $5.31
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Library Binding
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.87
$10.15 $5.31

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student




Frequently Bought Together

I Read It, but I Don't Get It: Comprehension Strategies for Adolescent Readers + Do I Really Have to Teach Reading? + Fair Isn't Always Equal: Assessing & Grading in the Differentiated Classroom
Price for all three: $54.38

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Stenhouse Publishers (January 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 157110089X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1571100894
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,596 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Cris Tovani received her degrees from the University of San Diego and the University of Colorado. She is currently doing national consulting and teaching work and serving as a literacy coach full time at a secondary school

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

This book helps teachers use real reading strategies in a practical way.
Jennifer
Cris Tovani has created a great resource for future teachers as well as current teachers to refer to in guiding students in reading for understanding.
K. Walsh
This book is a must read for all middle school and high school teachers.
Middle School Teacher

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

156 of 156 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
Cris Tovani's book is fabulous! As a reading teacher, it helped me to find ways to help my students understand what they were reading AND to help them understand when they were understanding. It is obvious that the author knows her readers well and is able to help them to read for real purposes and to give them strategies for monitoring their own comprehension. I have read Strategies that Work by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goodvis as well as Mosaic of Thought by Ellin Keene and Susan Zimmerman. I Read It But I Don't Get It adds to the things I learned about comprehension from these books. Although this book is written about middle school and high school students, I have used many of the ideas in the book with my upper elementary grade students. So many of the issues are the same. Many of my elementary colleagues are also finding this book helpful and have added it to their professional libraries. It also has great insights for content teachers--thoughts for helping students comprehend content reading. I highly recommend it for all teachers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
60 of 60 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
I teach seventh grade English in a district that expects 12-year-olds to read classics--and some really can, but others are stuck at a third or fourth grade reading level. I Read It, But I Don't Get It has some very practical suggestions that I can incorporate easily into my class to enrich the learning for all levels of readers. As I read this book, I became aware of the strategies I use to read difficult texts. Now I can pass those strategies on to my students. Few secondary teachers have the training to teach, or the time to gain the knowledge provided in this little text. Thanks to Cris Tovani, we now have a fine new resouce.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
81 of 88 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Campbell on June 14, 2001
Format: Paperback
As a high school English teacher I am always looking for ways to make the invisible process of reading more accessible to my students. Tovani's book is wonderful! She not only provides sound advice for all teachers, but also models good teaching throughout her book. Usually, I am disappointed with educational authors as they offer impractical strategies that would never work with real students in a typical classroom. Tovani's book made me happy that I signed up to teach summer school and I am jazzed to try out her practical suggestions with students. Bravo!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By "thestraightpoop" on January 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
Tovani's approach to teaching reading to the most reluctant of learners is rather insightful. She does an excellent job of pointing out the assumptions that above-average readers make while reading that are not necessarily a part of the reluctant reader's experience. The only criticism I have of the book is that I had hoped to find ready to use material for the classroom. Instead, I found that while reading, it forced me to re-evaluate my own instructional approach. Ultimately, this is probably a far better thing than any quick fix approach. If you teach inner city kids or kids who come from homes where reading is not the norm, I believe you will find this book most helpful to your overall approach to managing the language arts classroom.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
42 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
As a high school special education teacher, this books speaks volumes to me!!! It is a revelation to see that special education teachers aren't the only ones facing the problems of kids who "read it, but don't get it." This book was recommended to me by a Title I Reading Specialist and I will be forever grateful. As a special ed teacher, I had received a lot of training in decoding instruction but not much in the way of teaching comprehension. As Cris Tovani said in her book, it is often erroneously expected that if they can at least read the words they'll understand them. I have found that this error perpetuates, and was at a loss for how to teach my downtrodden teenagers to understand. This book has given me so many useful strategies and after changing the way I read just one story, I have seen a difference in the level of comprehension and participation in my class of students with learning disabilities. I'm glad that Cris Tovani doesn't offer any ready-made lessons or materials in this book. If she had, I may not have read the rest of the book and would have missed out on the wisdom contained in its pages. I have recommended this book to several of my colleagues and am hoping that this trend catches on. By all means, if you need help learning to teach kids how to learn from text this is the book for you! Excellent companions to this book are "Nonfiction Matters" by Stephanie Harvey and "Strategies That Work" by Stephanie Harvey and Ann Goudvis (this book gives much of the same information that is in "I Read It, But I Don't Get It" but has an immense book list at the back of the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Brooke P on April 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
In this book, Chris Tovani invites you into one of her high school reading workshop classes. This reading workshop class is filled with students who are fluent readers, but who are also unable to comprehend what they read. Also, they have not elected to take the course, resulting in a room full of bored expressions and bad attitudes. The book begins at day one, and as you begin to read, you start to really feel sorry for Tovani, wondering how she is ever going to reach these reluctant students and turn them into better readers. But as she takes you through the class, and you read about each of her strategies, she makes it seem almost effortless. Tovani is able to connect with her students, and it is clear that they quickly gain her respect. You also learn that she herself was a "fake reader" until her 30s! I believe that this is a major reason why she is able to teach her students so successfully; she knows exactly what they are going through, and as a result, she is able to show them what really works. Tovani, a nationally-known reading consultant, continues to teach English and reading at the high school level because of this dedication to helping students.

Comprehending what we read really is something that most of us take for granted, and it's a skill that is very difficult to teach. Oftentimes, students who struggle with comprehension will simply read the words on a page and expect the meaning to arrive automatically. Tovani also acknowledges that some students want to make their teachers responsible for their thinking. When they are confused, they think that it is the teacher's job to fix it. Tovani tells us that many times, students don't realize that they actually have the tools to change their reading habits themselves.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search