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Comment: Shared Knowledge is a not for profit public charity! Check us out on facebook. We provide funding for educational programs in Richmond, Virginia. PLEASE READ FULL DESCRIPTION -USED GOOD- This book has been read and may show wear to the cover and or pages. There may be some dog-eared pages. In some cases the internal pages may contain highlighting/margin notes/underlining or any combination of these markings. The binding will be secure in all cases. This is a good reading and studying copy and has been verified that all pages are legible and intact. If the book contained a CD it is not guaranteed to still be included. Your purchase directly supports our scholarship program as well as our partner charities. All items are packed and shipped from the Amazon warehouse. Thanks so much for your purchase!
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Reading the Rabbit: Explorations in Warner Bros. Animation Paperback – June 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press (June 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813525381
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813525389
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,314,165 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

KEVIN S. SANDLER is an assistant professor of media industries at the University of Arizona. In 1995 he won the Society for Animation Studies Student Essay Contest .

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
Over the last few years, academics have discovered the joy of writing about pop culture phenomena. Some (like the contributors to the book Enterprise Zones, a collection of papers on Star Trek) get lost in a fog of postmodernist critical/cultural theory, churning out abstruse and obtuse collections of quotations from French philosophers, ignoring as much as possible the text under study.
Thankfully, the contributors to this book don't do that. They're writing some serious history and commentary, but the Warner Bros. cartoons remain the focus, not what Jameson said about what Derrida said about what Foucault said. More to the point, even when criticizing elements of the cartoons (as in the paper on representation of black characters), the reader senses that the writers are fans of the Warner Bros. cartoons, flawed though some may be. There's always the sense that, no matter how serious the discussion, this is ultimately about something fun.
Oh, and the editor's comments in the introduction, about the recent dumbing down of the classic characters into friendly TV commercial shills and merchandise movers, is right on the money (so to speak).
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 25, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book for anyone who likes warner brothers animation. This book covers many interesting topics that you normally wouldn't think of. Some on the topics cover Gender Evasion of bugs bunny, African-American:Images and portrayal, temporary Disneyfication of Warner cartoons and fans verses Warner Brothers and even talks about the fans erotic fantasys (some people actually think of that ?)on the internet. It's a really interesting book and I really recomend it. It's not boring like others i've read. Each chapter is also written by a different author ( Kevin Sandler only edited them)so it keep it interesting.
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14 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Rachel Newstead on May 29, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Animation fans be warned--this is anything but light reading.
While I consider myself to be a reasonably intelligent person, I must admit I had considerable trouble slogging through the dense, polysyllabic prose. Once I did so, however, I found the book did contain some interesting observations:
In one installment, one of the book's many co-contributors examines the deconstruction--and reassertion--of gender roles. No news to those of us who are transgendered--the book points out things that many in the TG community find obvious. Namely the main premise, that gender roles are ridiculed (as with Bugs Bunny's crossdressing) in order to reinforce them. Whether the animators themselves had this intention is questionable--they were merely following a formula as old as vaudeville-- but it does make one think. A related essay covers the lampooning of heterosexual behavior in the Pepe Le Pew cartoons. The contributor noticed what I discovered many years ago--that "gay panic" in straight males forces them into the same sort of blissful denial as poor Pepe. They, like Pepe, try to convince the world they are irresistible to women, because that is what defines them as men. Most of all, however, they're trying to convince themselves.
There is also an excellent overview of the portrayal of blacks in Warner Brothers cartoons--it contends, as I have always believed, that the animators themselves were not necessarily racist even if their cartoons sometimes were. The fact that Bob Clampett went so far as to take his animators to a black jazz club in L.A. (as preparation for the brilliant "Coal Black and De Sebben Dwarfs") shows a sincere, if naive, sensitivity on his part.
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