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Real World Web Services Paperback – October 14, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0596006426 ISBN-10: 059600642X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (October 14, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 059600642X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596006426
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,658,295 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Will Iverson has been working in the computer & information technology field professionally since 1990. His diverse background includes developing statistical applications for use analyzing data from the NASA Space Shuttle, product management for Apple Computer, developer relations for Symantec's VisualCaf, running an independent J2EE consulting company, and now helping build BEA's dev2dev developer web site. Will lives in Union City, California.


More About the Author

Will Iverson is the CTO of Dynacron Group, a Kirkland, WA-based consulting firm.

Will Iverson has been working in the computer and information technology field professionally since 1990. His diverse background includes developing statistical applications to analyze data from the NASA Space Shuttle, product management for Apple Computer, and developer relations for Symantec's VisualCafé™. For nearly five years, Will ran an independent J2EE consulting company with a variety of clients including Sun, BEA, and Canal+ Technologies. He was Scrum Certified in 2004 by Ken Schwaber. Will worked for SolutionsIQ's Professional Services group as a Practice Director and General Manager, with clients including at&t, T-Mobile, the State of Washington, and Microsoft.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Eric Wuehler on November 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
I think the book will appeal to two groups. Those people who want to use a web service from a company described in the book and people who are interested in learning about some real world applications using web services. The number of companies discussed are few, but they are the big players. I liked the discussion of web services in general and how they can be (and are) used in real world applications.

This book shows you - with copious amounts of code - how to use various services provided by real companies right away. For me, this book was a great way to gather ideas about different approaches to provide and interact with web services. It does a great job at proving how simple web services really are.

Although web services are not language-specific, the book and all the examples are in Java. You should be pretty comfortable with Java, Tomcat, and similar technologies to be able to get the examples working. The companies/web services discussed are: Amazon, eBay, Google, FedEx, PayPal, CDDB. It also discusses interacting with bloggers.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Visionary Hacker on December 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
Real World Web Services starts with a recitation of the history of the internet, then

discuses some of the web service offerings currently available, including Java code

for programming remote procdure calls to them, then concludes with a short visionary

chapter in which the author relaxes his prohibition against opinionating and speculating.

The discussion of N-tier architecture, and the checklist of things to be careful about,

when considering deployment of a web service, and the nod to capitalist realities -- if

you don't have a business plan, you're just playing around, not like that's bad or anything,

but the angels aren't going to kidnap you and issue you your very own beach house -- are

most useful, and come from a solid perpective.

How do you choose between raw CGI, SOAP, REST, binary, and XML? What are

the good points and drawbacks of each? Real World Web Services discusses these

generalities. Is UDDI worth the trouble when WDSL already comes with commercial

SOAP development tools? Real world web services will tell you, probably not.

As a developer of web services since before the term had been coined, I tend to

use the traditional Comman Gateway Interface key/value pairs data declaration

method for passing data to my web services rather than XML. Iverson touches on

this legacy method, in a box, on page 99, while discussing PayPal's Instant Payment

Notification system: "Using a simple HTTP request/response is perhaps the most basic,

universal web service. It works with virtually every programming language and requires no

special configuration to use.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jack D. Herrington on November 6, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is mainly code applied to several web services case studies. There is an introductory segment at the beginning which has some nice illustrations. After that the book uses a combination of Java code and screenshots to demonstrate eight example uses of web services. The most handy one, in my opinion, is the News Aggegator, which uses web services to retrieve information from sites like Amazon. Then it turns that information into RSS so that you can retrieve it with your news reader.

There is a lot more code than text in this book. If you learn well by looking at code then this book should work for you. This book is a little looser than the O'Reilly standard. There are more screenshots than usual, the UML graphics are not as well done as usual, and the code is not as well annotated. That being said, it's a fun and informative read that finally injects a little reality into the web services hype.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Duff HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
Since Domino 7 will start to incorporate web services more readily into application development, I figured it was time to start getting a little more versed on the subject. To that end, I got a copy of Real World Web Services by Will Iverson (O'Reilly). Coupled with a detailed tutorial/reference manual, this is a really good selection.

Chapter List: Web Service Evolution; Foundations of Web Services; Development Platform; Project 1: Competitive Analysis; Project 2: Auctions and Shipping; Project 3: Billing and Faxing; Project 4: Syndicated Search; Project 5: News Aggregator; Project 6: Audio CD Catalog; Project 7: Hot News Sheet; Project 8: Automatic Daily Discussions; Future Web Service Directions; Index

While the book is smallish (206 pages), there's a lot of value packed in it. Iverson takes you from the beginning of simple HTTP request and responses, through data scrapping, into RPC technology, and then finally into web services. The overview really helps you to understand how we got to where we are. He explains how to set up a simple test development environment as well as what you'll need, and then it's directly into the example projects. Here's where the book shines. These projects connect to live data sources such as Amazon, Google, FedEx, and eBay, so you're not dealing with simple examples that don't translate to the real world. Each of the projects are applications that you could easily see yourself using on a daily basis, either exactly as written or with some moderate tweaking. And since you're learning the mechanics of connecting with that service, it's easy to extrapolate the information into the areas that might interest you more.
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