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Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World [Hardcover]

Jane McGonigal
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (164 customer reviews)


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Book Description

January 20, 2011 1594202850 978-1594202858 1
Visionary game designer Jane McGonigal reveals how we can harness the power of games to solve real-world problems and boost global happiness.

More than 174 million Americans are gamers, and the average young person in the United States will spend ten thousand hours gaming by the age of twenty-one. According to world-renowned game designer Jane McGonigal, the reason for this mass exodus to virtual worlds is that videogames are increasingly fulfilling genuine human needs. In this groundbreaking exploration of the power and future of gaming, McGonigal reveals how we can use the lessons of game design to fix what is wrong with the real world.

Drawing on positive psychology, cognitive science, and sociology, Reality Is Broken uncovers how game designers have hit on core truths about what makes us happy and utilized these discoveriesto astonishing effect in virtual environments. Videogames consistently provide the exhilarating rewards, stimulating challenges, and epic victories that are so often lacking in the real world. But why, McGonigal asks, should we use the power of games for escapist entertainment alone? Her research suggests that gamers are expert problem solvers and collaborators because they regularly cooperate with other players to overcome daunting virtual challenges, and she helped pioneer a fast-growing genre of games that aims to turn gameplay to socially positive ends.

In Reality Is Broken, she reveals how these new alternate reality games are already improving the quality of our daily lives, fighting social problems such as depression and obesity, and addressing vital twenty-first-century challenges-and she forecasts the thrilling possibilities that lie ahead. She introduces us to games like World Without Oil, a simulation designed to brainstorm-and therefore avert- the challenges of a worldwide oil shortage, and Evoke, a game commissioned by the World Bank Institute that sends players on missions to address issues from poverty to climate change.

McGonigal persuasively argues that those who continue to dismiss games will be at a major disadvantage in the coming years. Gamers, on the other hand, will be able to leverage the collaborative and motivational power of games in their own lives, communities, and businesses. Written for gamers and nongamers alike, Reality Is Broken shows us that the future will belong to those who can understand, design, and play games.


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Practical Advice for Gamers by Jane McGonigal

Reality is Broken explains the science behind why games are good for us--why they make us happier, more creative, more resilient, and better able to lead others in world-changing efforts.

But some games are better for us than others, and there is too much of a good thing.

Here are a few secrets that aren’t in the book to help you (or the gamer in your life) get the most positive impact from playing games.

This practical advice--5 key quidelines, plus 2 quick rules--is scientifically backed, and it can be summed up in a single sentence:

Play games you enjoy no more than 21 hours a week; face-to-face with friends and family as often as you can; and in co-operative or creator modes whenever possible.

1. Don’t play more than 21 hours a week.

Studies show that games benefit us mentally and emotionally when we play up to 3 hours a day, or 21 hours a week. (In extremely stressful circumstances--such as serving in the military during war-time--research shows that gamers can benefit from as many as 28 hours a week.) But for virtually everyone else, whenever you play more than 21 hours a week, the benefits of gaming start to decline sharply. By the time you’re spending 40 hours or more a week playing games, the psychological benefits of playing games have disappeared entirely--and are replaced with negative impacts on your physical health, relationships, and real-life goals. So always strive to keep your gaming in the sweet spot: 7–21 hours a week.

2. Playing with real-life friends and family is better than playing alone all the time, or with strangers.

Gaming strengthens your social bonds and builds trust, two key factors in any positive relationship. And the more positive relationships you have in real life, the happier, healthier and more successful you are.

You can get mental and emotional benefits from single-player games, or by playing with strangers online--but to really unlock the power of games, it’s important to play them with people you really know and like as often as possible.

A handy rule-of-thumb: try to make half of your gaming social. If you play 10 hours a week, try to play face-to-face with real-life friends or family for at least 5 of those hours.

(And if you’re not a gamer yourself--but you have a family member who plays games all the time, it would do you both good to play together--even if you think you don’t like games!)

3. Playing face-to-face with friends and family beats playing with them online.

If you’re in the same physical space, you’ll supercharge both the positive emotional impacts and the social bonding.

Many of the benefits of games are derived from the way they make us feel--and all positive emotions are heightened by face-to-face interaction.

Plus, research shows that social ties are strengthened much more when we play games in the same room than when we play games together online.

Multi-player games are great for this. But single-player works too! You can get all the same benefits by taking turns at a single-player game, helping and cheering each other on.

4. Cooperative gameplay, overall, has more benefits than competitive gameplay.

Studies show that cooperative gameplay lifts our mood longer, and strengthens our friendships more, than competing against each other.

Cooperative gameplay also makes us more likely to help someone in real life, and better collaborators at work--boosting our real-world likeability and chances for success.

Competition has its place, too, of course--we learn to trust others more when we compete against them. But if we spend all our time competing with others, we miss out on the special benefits of co-op play. So when you’re gaming with others, be sure to check to see if there are co-op missions or a co-op mode available. An hour of co-op a week goes a long way. (Find great co-op games for every platform, and a family-friendly list too, at Co-Optimus, the best online resource for co-op gaming.)

5. Creative games have special positive impacts.

Many games encourage or even require players to design and create as part of the gameplay process--for example: Spore, Little Big Planet, and Minecraft; the Halo level designer and the Guitar Hero song creator. These games have been shown to build up players’ sense of creative agency--and they make us more likely to create something outside of the game. If you want to really build up your own creative powers, creative games are a great place to start.

Of course, you can always take the next creative step--and start making your own games. If you’ve never made a game, it’s easier than you think--and there are some great books to help you get started.

2 Other Important Rules:

* You can get all of the benefits of a good game without realistic violence--you (or your kids) don’t have to play games with guns or gore.

If you feel strongly about violence, look to games in other genres--there’s no shortage of amazing sports, music, racing, puzzle, role-playing, casual, strategy and adventure games.

*Any game that makes you feel bad is no longer a good game for you to play.

This should be obvious, but sometimes we get so caught up in our games that we forget they’re supposed to be fun.

If you find yourself feeling really upset when you lose a game, or if you’re fighting with friends or strangers when you play--you’re too invested. Switch to a different game for a while, a game that has “lower stakes” for you personally.

Or, especially if you play with strangers online, you might find yourself surrounded by other players who say things that make you uncomfortable--or who just generally act like jerks. Their behavior will actually make it harder for you to get the positive benefits of games--so don’t waste your time playing with a community that gets you down.

Meanwhile, if you start to wonder if you’re spending too much time on a particular game – maybe you’re starting to feel just a tiny bit addicted--keep track of your gaming hours for one week. Make sure they add up to less than 21 hours! And you may want to limit yourself to even fewer for a little while if you’re feeling too much “gamer regret.”

From Booklist

People who spend hours playing video or online games are often maligned for “wasting their time” or “not living in the real world,” but McGonigal argues persuasively and passionately against this notion in her eminently effective examination of why games are important. She begins by disabusing the reader of some inherent prejudices and assumptions made about gamers, such as that they’re lazy and unambitious. Quite the opposite: McGonigal finds that gamers are working hard to achieve goals within the world of whatever game they are playing, whether it’s going on a quest to win attributes to enhance their in-game characters or performing tasks to get to a higher level in the game. Games inspire hard work, the setting of ambitious goals, learning from and even enjoying failure, and coming together with others for a common goal. McGonigal points out many real-world applications, including encouraging students to seek out secret assignments, setting up household chores as a challenge, even a 2009 game created by The Guardian to help uncover the excessive expenses of members of Parliament. With so many people playing games, this comprehensive, engaging study is an essential read. --Kristine Huntley

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Press HC, The; 1 edition (January 20, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594202850
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594202858
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (164 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #87,090 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jane McGonigal, PhD is a world-renowned designer of alternate reality games -- or, games that are designed to improve real lives and solve real problems.

She believes game designers are on a humanitarian mission -- and her #1 goal in life is to see a game developer win a Nobel Peace Prize.

She is the author of Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World (Penguin Press, 2011).

She has created and deployed award-winning games and secret missions in more than 30 countries on six continents, for partners such as the American Heart Association, the International Olympics Committee, the World Bank Institute, and the New York Public Library. She specializes in games that challenge players to tackle real-world problems, such as poverty, hunger and climate change, through planetary-scale collaboration. Her best-known work includes EVOKE, Superstruct, World Without Oil, Cruel 2 B Kind, and The Lost Ring. These games have been featured in The New York Times, Wired, and The Economist, and on MTV, CNN, and NPR.

Jane is also a future forecaster. She currently serves as the Director of Games Research & Development at the Institute for the Future, a non-profit research group in Palo Alto, California. Her research focuses on how games are transforming the way we lead our real lives, and how they can be used to increase our resilience and well-being. Her work has been featured in Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, O(prah) Magazine, Fast Company, The New York Times Science section, and more.

She is the founder of Gameful, "a secret headquarters for worldchanging game developers." (www.gameful.org)

She has a PhD from the University of California at Berkeley in performance studies, and has consulted and developed internal game workshops for more than a dozen Fortune 500 and Global 500 Companies, including Intel, Nike, Disney, McDonalds, Accenture, Microsoft, and Nintendo. Before joining IFTF, she taught game design and game theory at UC Berkeley and the San Francisco Art Institute.

She enjoys speaking to global audiences -- (watch videos). She has appeared at TED and the New Yorker Conference, and keynoted SXSW interactive, the Game Developers Conference, the Idea Festival, the National Association of Broadcasters, the Web 2.0 Summit, UX Week, Webstock, and more.

She currently serves on the advisory board for Games for Change, and for the annual Serious Games Summit at the Game Developers Conference.

A former New Yorker, she now lives in San Francisco with her husband Kiyash and Shetland Sheepdog Meche.

ACHIEVEMENTS: UNLOCKED

Fast Company: "Top 100 Creative People in Business"
Oprah Winfrey for O Magazine: "20 Most Inspiring Women in the World"
MIT Technology Review: "Top 35 innovators changing the world through technology"
Business Week: "Top Ten Innovators to Watch"
Harvard Business Review: "Top 20 Breakthrough Ideas"
Game Developer Magazine: "The Most Important 50 Game Developers"
Gamasutra: "20 Most Important Women in Videogaming"
BrandWeek: #1 Bright Idea of the Year
New York Times: "10 Breakthrough Ideas in Science"
World Technology Forum: "Entertainment Breakthrough of the Year"
Activism Award from SXSW Interactive
Best Storytelling Award at Come Out and Play International Games Festival
Most Important Futures Work of the Year from the Association of Professional Futurists
Innovation Award from the International Game Developers Association
The Gaming Award from the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences
Year in Review honors from The New York Times
Ranked #16 All-Time Most Engaging TED talk out of 835 all-time TED talks (as of 2010) .. and that's one ahead of Bill Gates, who's ranked at #17

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
117 of 129 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well written, enthusiastic, overpromised, but great February 27, 2011
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
McGonigal has written a fun and readable book. She has found a niche here -- the idea that video games express our best selves -- and her enthusiasm on the subject is downright infectious. I kept thinking that she is one of those people in the center of her social network. One of those people that convinces her friends to get out of the house and try new, quirky, interesting things. She makes life fun by making it a game. It's nearly impossible not to get caught up in her enthusiasm.

There are two sides to this enthusiasm. First of all, she has managed to convince people, on a grand scale, that video games can be a force for good. She has actually gone out and done things to reform the way we think about video games by creating ones that tap the potential to be useful in the world. She and game designers like her may well be a force that sees this grand idea through to the end.

On the other hand, there's a nagging feeling (the devil on my shoulder) that tells me that this idea is overstated and undersupported. The "science" here really doesn't (and couldn't, when it comes down to it) say that the world is better off as a direct result of video games. In short-term laboratory experiments, there are some interesting results. But the comparison groups here are what beg the question -- playing video games makes you more optimistic as compared to what? Because playing a role playing game for a few minutes makes you more confident in talking to the opposite sex immediately afterward does not mean that playing WoW for 22 hours a week is going to jazz up your sex life.
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37 of 41 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Having been around computers and games since I was 2, and having played online games from the start when I was 13, I can say that Jane McGonigal's description of the online world today's kids are growing up with is extremely accurate. When I sat down to write what soft skills I've picked up from all my years playing online games, I came up with a rather exhaustive list. It's astounding, regardless of the genre played (FPS, like Halo, MMOs like World of Warcraft).

Why do we find games so engaging, so engrossing? Many schools, businesses and the like are blaming 'addiction' to games for people tuning out. It goes far, far beyond simple 'addiction' (though problems do exist). Jane goes to great lengths to EXPLAIN the concepts of engagement this 'video game addiction' really consists of - and that schools, businesses and the greater community can and SHOULD learn from such an efficient, accessible use of these concepts to improve the quality of life for everyone in society.

This is a must read - particularly for any businessperson, teacher, parent, or gamer in the community.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Perspective Likely to Be Helpful for Non-Gamers April 8, 2013
Format:Paperback
I suspect my reactions to this book may be different than the majority of readers, as I assume most readers will be dedicated gamers or those who is close to someone who is a serious gamer and want to know more about it.*

First the positives about this book.
I appreciate than Jane McGonigal brings a fresh perspective and intelligence to looking at games. She draws from research in a variety of quarters which often are elucidating. For example, despite reading many smart popularized books on behavioral and cognitive brain issues, I hadn't read anything about why teasing (or self-deprecating humor) is an effective way of building camaraderie. And of course, she does a good job building a long and detailed case for what games have to offer. Since that has been discussed in detail in many other reviews, I won't say much about it.

The Negatives
Sometimes I felt there was too much detail, even after a simple point was made. I listened to the audio book, so I can't cite chapter and verse, but one example I remember is that she mentioned something about rock stars and reeled off a long list of stars, finishing with the line "to name a few." Well, actually, you named way more than few. I know this may sound like nitpicking, but it was indicative of an overall sense of wishing she'd make her point and move on more rather than give LOTS of examples. My lack of interest in specifics about particular games may be coming into play. Plus the fact when listening to an audio book, you can't skim effectively. So take that criticism in context to your own interests and form of "reading" this book.
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61 of 73 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I encourage anyone who is interested in playing games, whether they be board, video, MMORPGs, or alternative reality games in general (ARGS), to read this book.

I have listened to the author speak, and have participated in a few games of her design, and have always been fascinated by her passion for analyzing the effects of games on its participants and society. She is a scientist of the next generation. As our world becomes smaller and our communities larger, we are beginning to see things in a new world view. Whether your particular political leanings are left or right makes no difference, for how we handle these problems are what needs debate.

Dr. Jane McGonigal recognizes the importance of some of these world issues, and creates unique opportunities to explore solutions in a "game-world". By doing so, we tend to be more focused on fixing problems in a communal sense, and we let go of our own personal prejudices and faults in order to work together for individual and community fulfillment.

She is leading her own personal quest to not only reject the notion that gaming is a waste of time, but that we can learn more about ourselves and each other through gaming. She is one of the few voices who will be leading our society for its own betterment, and I can't recommend enough that everyone read this book Reality is Broken.

She pairs a child's curiosity and wonder with the intelligence and discipline of an adult, and captivates you right from the very beginning. I received my hardcover yesterday, and am currently tearing through it. This will be in my personal library forever, as I can see where I'll need to reference her research and ideas time and time again.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought-provoking, well researched and somewhat life-changing.
I'm going to keep this short. This book has given me an entirely different perspective on why I play games and what I'm getting out of them. Read more
Published 8 days ago by Robert Anderson
4.0 out of 5 stars Games as Self-Help
The most surprisingly thing about this book is that it is many ways a self-help book. It discusses games in the context of how game-playing (and understanding games) can help make... Read more
Published 28 days ago by Shawn Klein
5.0 out of 5 stars Gamers save the world
This book gave an incredibly descriptive account of the development of modern games and their increasing relevance as a tool to solve global-scale problems. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Ilene R. Tyler
4.0 out of 5 stars Read to appreciate 'video game addicts' in their legions (literally)
4 stars means I like it, but to be clear, I really mean I only like 1/2 or so of this overly long and one-sided book. Read more
Published 1 month ago by R. Reviere
5.0 out of 5 stars Reality is Broken, Excellent title
It is a great book and amazing ideas, I would recommend to all my colleagues and friends to read it and experience the reality how it is broken.
Thanks
Published 1 month ago by Silvia Ghanem
1.0 out of 5 stars Wanted to love and and by all reason, should of, but didn't
I am a gamer, I love psychology, I love the idea of gamification to improve the world. By all reason I should have loved this book. I hated it. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Todd
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating!
I used this book as the basis for gameifying my university-level history class. It was a great success. Many students said it was the best thing they read all semester.
Published 2 months ago by Todd Mack
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book.
I saw Jane speak and I truly believe in what she says. Gaming makes learning much more fun!
I would like to see her break her statistics out as far as how many of her gamers... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Bonnie B. Thurber
2.0 out of 5 stars bought for my wife's book club reading
She was not a big fan of the content of the book. The club found the book "fair" and of the approximately 20 memebrs only 2 really liked the book.
Published 3 months ago by Lago Gates
5.0 out of 5 stars Recommend it to All!
I must be a closet geek because this book is one of my all time favorites. Jane thinks out of the box and she allows you to go there too. Read more
Published 3 months ago by Kimberlee Hayward
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