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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on September 5, 2009
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This as a well researched and notated book with clear explanations of a very complicated subject. Gardener's "Realm of the Ring Lords" takes the reader on a journey beginning in Transylvania, Egypt and ancient Sumeria and arriving in the modern Western world, with frequent stops through the UK, France, Germany and many other European and Asian stops along the way. This book details how the tales of fairies, dragons pixies, gnomes, and elves all derive from the same source: a specially bred race of people called the nephilim who rose to prominence thousands of years before Christ and left their imprint on cultures all around the world. The author demonstrates how legends of the Grail, the Lord of the Rings, stories of the Elven-home and so on, are all inextricably linked and, ultimately stem from the same sources, being different tellings of, and using different symbols to, tell the same stories.

Of great importance to me in a work of this kind, which challenges many long held belief systems and "authorized history", is a good list of sources. Laurence Gardner delivers in this respect as well, not failing to back up his claims with a lot of other sources the reader can refer to. While I don't necessarily agree with all that Gardener states, I can say that he makes many valid points that shed new light, and make room for new ideas about, many of the concepts that people take for granted in every day life and society.

For anyone interested in dragons, fairies, gnomes, vampires, werewolves; pixies, elves, mermaids, swan-maidens and grail knights and The Lord of the Rings, you can find many interesting answers here. For lovers of history, culture and linguistics, this book is a treasure trove. However, if you're looking for a fantasy-fiction story or some sort of continuation of Tolkien's Middle Earth, this is not the place to find it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on August 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book begins with a look into Tolkien's books and the relationships to distant history. Information and the process of the author's thoughts drift to linking the Ring lord culture into a roller coaster ride through almost every distant european and middle eastern culture. Lots of this material is well presented and factual. Some is also conjecture on the author's behalf. All is well presented and adventureous to read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 27, 2013
Format: Paperback
I read into this book hoping to delve further into the mytho's of JRR Tolkien's Legenderium. The book sort of did that and yet it also opened up several other doorways for further exploration. The book also covered some ground with the grail mythos. If you are looking for something entirely new on Tolkien you will find yourself surprised with some new revelations. The Grail mysteries go further back as well, they go back all the way to the Middle East.

The book covers a lot of territory. First let us address the Ringlords. All the way back in Sumeria carrying a ring or a torque was a sign of sovereignty. Some symbols of sovereignty included the snake and the dragon, both of which were called serpents. The snake represented wisdom in ancient times and the circle represented wholeness. The Sumerian Gods had a council of 9 deities with Anu being the most senior. Each of them had a ring, totally nine rings with one to rule them all. Anu held the master ring.One ring to rule them all. Sound familiar? Let us look at Odin who ruled from Asgard. He controlled 9 realms and he also had a magic ring. There was also a sword stuck in tree for a hero to pull out, the Norse had a strong influence on the King Arthur story. Actually Odin got his ring from Andvari, a dwarf, in time he lost it and a fish swallowed it. Later on it was found by Sigurd the son of an ousted sovereign. He battle a dragon called fafnir to redeem treasure. One of the things he takes is a ring, a magic ring. He ends up giving it to a Valkyrie that he awakens.But the ring is cursed and in time he forget his vow to the Valkyrie and marries a princess. Later through treachery Sigurd is slain and the Valkyrie joins him on the funeral pyre. The princess gets the ring but end up drowning herself with it in her possession. The ring returns to it's source. For Tolkien fan's this will definitely ring a bell.

Magic swords seems to carry the day as King Arthur has Exacalibur. There was a magic sword in Lord of the Rings but it must be put back together. Now the grail also figures well in the Aurthur mythos. We have heard it before in Dan Brown's book. It refers to the womb of Mary Magdalene, Jesus's wife. She gave birth to her child in France. This book continues with that theory and goes back even further. Apparently sovereignty was determined by the mother. The children from their womb was holy. Mary or the Sumerian Mary referred to these ladies and their was a priesthood of ladies who were connected to the water. Hence the legends of nymphs and mermaid or merry maids. Priestess line and princess line. Brothers made sure in Ancient Egypt to marry their sisters or half sisters to keep the bloodline going. Who were these women descended from why of course Tiamat the dragon queen ruler of the depth. Goddesses like Kalimath and Lilith came after her. These people were part of a royal family that had thrones in France,Ireland, Sumeria, Egypt and ancient Israel. They were called the Dragon Kings and according to this book they were anointed with the fat of Komodo dragons.

This family of enlightened monarchy would eventually fall. The Roman Empire never liked them much as they stood in the way of their world domination. The Catholic Church their successor retained this hatred. To get rid of the Dragon Kings the Catholic Church manipulated things behind the scenes and came up with a brilliant forgery called "The Donation of Constantine" Where in the Church was given powers to anoint leader. It was a fake and was used to knock down sovereignty of the Dragon kings. In this book you will learn about the Stewarts of Scotland,Merovingians of Southern France, the line of David and how the Church manipulated things to get them out of power.

Where did these dragon kings come from? Sumerian sources say from the North or from the Heaven. Could be aliens or a more advanced civilization. Scientist always knew the Sumerians came from somewhere else and moved into what we call today Iraq. It seems readily apparent that they came from somewhere in Central Europe near Transylvania. They wore armor that looked like Dragon scale. From them came the Kassites,Fir Bolgs and the Tuatha D dannan.Sumerians style writing that predates Sumeria by thousands of years was found their. Mummies were found in Central Europe that resembled those of Ancient Egypt. Some were also found in Monglolia and the bodies well preserved looked Central European. The people who came out of Transylvania were called the Yallanu or Woodland Lords. Their influence would stretch across the known world.

The Merovingian hold out in Southern France was were the line continued to live as did the ideology. The people their called the Cathars held the feminine divine to the highest belief. In fact the Catholic Church had the Albigensian crusade their and killed off the Cathars. Albi actually refers to elf. These dragon kings were also called the elf kings or the shining ones. Elfs were not tiny people in fairy tales they were real people. Fairy tales were written to both conceal the truth from the uninitiated and spread the truth to those who knew how to read them. The druid were the priests and they represented the wisdom of the snake.

The book is an amazing read. You will learn the back stories to King Aurthur,Robin Hood, Stewarts Scotland, and the Merovingian of Europe . I found it enjoyable. May details were left out as the review was getting long. I would say that good sections of the book can be verified through independent research. Some of if I take with a grain of salt as the sources used may not be all that scholarly. Now the theory that some advanced human society came out of some part of the world and was responsible for all these royal families may sound far fetched, but do the research there are just too many parallels in different societies that are spread apart for their not to be. Do the research.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I am a huge fan of Heinrich Schlieman...the brilliant, multilingual, millionaire, entrepreneur, adventurer who everyone thought was completely mad...until, that is, he found the ancient city of Troy. When others asked him, "How did you know it would be there?", he answered, "I have known all my life...ever since I read Homer's Iliad." My point is, the ancient legends, myths and archetypes that have shaped our disperate cultures throughout the millennia, may actually have a basis in fact. At least, that's what Laurence Gardner argues and he does a wonderful job (in the way only Laurence Gardner can) of weaving myth and fact into another compelling history of humanity. As a linguist and psychologist, I am charmed by his etymological and character analyses. Throughout my reading of this book (and I have read it probably three times now), I repeatedly experienced moments when I felt as though I was reading something I already knew, but could not recall ever learning. So much of it makes so much sense! Still, with all my high praise, it is not a book for the uninitiated. Those who are unfamiliar with Tolkien (the rare person I presume) or those who have no interest in ancient, polytheistic Mythologies, legends of fairies, pixies and elves, vampire and werewolf myths or have no interest in learning about ancient people and geographies should probably steer clear. Those readers, on the other hand, who wish to be challenged on their existing beliefs, who long to look at maps and understand the mystery/history behind the established, "victor's" history... those are the readers who would most likely enjoy this book. I have read every book written by Laurence Gardner (save one), and I find myself going back, rereading, dog-earring, highlighting and taking notes on this book and "The Lost Secrets of the Sacred Ark" more than any of his others. That is not meant to discredit his other works, rather to emphasize my strong personal preference for this particular achievement. If you have enjoyed Laurence Gardner's work in the past, by all means, get this book. Read it critically...don't believe everything you read...and you will learn something new...even if you have felt you have known it all your life!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on August 11, 2009
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
we love all of Gardner's books...
dear seekers after truth,
... but this is by far and away our favorite. This is true in part because we are elves (if you don't believe this is possible you need to read this book for the historical data that reveals it to be so), but also because we are lovers of and researchers into Faerie Lore and read nearly everything we can find on the subject and this is one of the best.
kyela,
the silver elves
[....]
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on November 22, 2006
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Waste of money. Gardner is resting on his laurels. There is so much that could be done with this title, but it was not. Instead we get a recital of stuff already said elsewhere not particularly related to the extensive lore which Tolkien drew upon. Way too little to do with the Realms of the Ring Lords, as if he was knocking off a book to exploit the popularity of Tolkien.

Pity, I was expecting more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 30, 2012
Format: Paperback
An extremely creative and imaginative book that shows a great deal of effort. What really got to me was his etymology. Viking- roving, warlike kings, nothing to do with the traditional etymology of going on an expedition. You don't often see such creative etymology. Gardner, in this as well as most other topics, looks at what is real and factual and decides that he has a better version. If you like your Christians wicked, your history mythical and your myths historical then you'll love this book. If you have read even one other book on history, mythology or etymology then perhaps you will find this offering to be a little far fetched.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 25, 2006
Format: Paperback
Lawrence Gardner ranks among the best for me. As with any author, I don't agree with 100% of what he says, but he's pretty dead on and has certainly done his homework. He definitely opened up new ideas and new avenues for me in my own interests and research.
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on July 8, 2014
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I've been compiling genealogical information about my family and was astonished to find so much mythology there. This book provided more essential information regarding this amazing discovery than all the stuff I read on the internet together. In fact, I was surprised to discover information that I had searched and searched for on the internet (to no avail) was handily catalogued in this incredible book. I would have known little or nothing about the Albigens without this book so I am very very grateful that Mr. Gardner wrote it.
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on September 24, 2013
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I love historical references for all things FAE and when you have history going back to pre-sumar it is a blast. I do write and will be using this for reference and that *aha moment* that will send readers flying to the encyclopedia.
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