Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums $5 Off Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services gotS5 gotS5 gotS5  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Reasonable Doubt: An Investigation into the Assassination of John F. Kennedy Hardcover – January, 1986

15 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$36.58 $0.78
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Investigative reporter Hurt here assembles an overview of evidence, circumstance and theory about the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963. In addition to reviewing the eight official inquiries and the various conspiracy theories, he minutely examines seemingly outlandish notions, such as the involvement of a Lee Harvey Oswald impostor in a Cuban conspiracy. The latter theory does not seem so outlandish after he produces a likely candidate and a witness whose testimony, though "terribly sullied," provides an abundance of plausible detail. Hurt builds a powerful case that Oswald did not kill the president or police officer J. D. Tippitt, and that he was the "patsy" he called himself shortly before Jack Ruby shot him to death. The prose is a bit breathless at timesHurt refers to the crime of the century, the autopsy of the century, etc.but after reading this book, few readers will doubt that the circumstances surrounding Kennedy's assassination remain among the mysteries of modern times, or that the components of that mystery are laid out with notable clarity here. Photos. January 27
Copyright 1985 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Except for confirmed Kennedy assassination freaks, most readers will approach yet another study of that killing with mixed feelings. In a well-researched work, as this appears to be, the story does not lose but gains in murkiness and contradiction. Hurt highlights problemsthe apparently flawed FBI investigation, the botched autopsy (with a glance at David Lifton's work, Best Evidence, LJ 4/1/81), the role of organized crime (see G. Robert Blakey and Richard Billings, The Plot To Kill the President , LJ 2/15/81), the role of the CIA, etc.and to that extent he helps. He claims to have found and interviewed at length a minor participant in the larger conspiracy and this claim may well set the issue off again. Thus, Hurt provides no new grand theories, but plenty of purportedly new evidence and intricate reasoning. Henry Steck, Political Science Dept., SUNY Coll. at Cortland
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 555 pages
  • Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston; Reissue edition (January 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0030040590
  • ISBN-13: 978-0030040597
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 1.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #253,509 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Jefferson T. Packer on May 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
Perhaps your interest in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was piqued by the Oliver Stone Film "JFK." Maybe you are an American History buff who wants to know more about one of the most terrible moments in the 20th century. Maybe you are just tired of listening to so-called "conspiracy theorists" and want to go straight to their sources to find out just how nuts they really are. No matter where you are coming from, you are in for more than you bargained for with this book.
In a nutshell, this book sets out to prove that a President of the United States was murdered by a conspiracy that involved the military industrial complex, organized crime and the CIA, along with disgruntled Cuban expatriots who were enraged at JFK for his handling of the Bay of Pigs. It also attempts to prove that this conspiracy was covered up by an amazing level of cooperation between various people and organizations who all had a reason to want President Kennedy dead. It seeks to show that the most powerful of these groups, was the group made up of all those who wanted, indeed needed, a war in Vietnam. It seeks to show that President Kennedy was murdered because he was committed to having all U.S. military forces out of Vietnam by 1965.
If, after reading this, you still have the stomach to venture into this nightmarish theory, you will find a well-reasoned, exhaustively researched, meticulously footnoted and beautifully written book of scholarly construction, with copious endnotes, a complete bibliography, and a full index. You will find well-reasoned paragraphs, incisive reasoning and theories that would be impossible to believe, if Henry Hurt did not do such a professional job of both documenting and interpreting his sources.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Christopher K. Halbower on September 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
Henry Hurt's "Reasonable Doubt" is an overview of the JFK assassination. Hurt was a researcher for the book "Legend: the Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald" by Edward Epstein. Hurt's research involved little more than contacting US Marines who knew Oswald. After providing research for Epstein, Hurt set aside the JFK case.

In 1981, his odysessy started anew. A man named Robert Easterling contacted him. Easterling was prepared to confess his role in the assassination of President Kennedy. Hurt, in an effort to prepare himself for this unusual interview, Hurt versed himself in the JFK assassination lore.

Hurt's overview of the case is amazing. His prose is easy to follow. His conclusions are logical. The biggest flaw in his research is, unfortunately, the inclusion of the Robert Easterling testimony.

The first chapter reads like a newspaper report. It's nine pages of who, what, where and when. After finishing this, the reader knows the basics of the official story.

Hurt then turns a critical eye to the Warren Commission's findings. There is no index from which to review the Warren Commission's hearings and exhibits. The report is hardly the corrollary of 26 supporting volumes. Congressional committees concluded that the FBI and CIA were derelict in submitting evidence to the Warren Commission. The FBI had destroyed or altered testimony or evidence. Credible leads that pointed away from the Warren Commission's main thesis were ignored.

After concluding the Warren Commission had not settled the issue, Hurt then looks at the autopsy and the Magic Bullet. The doctors in Dallas do not agree with the doctors at Bethesda. The Magic Bullet is pristine whereas test bullets fired into cadavers show significant deformation.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TLR on May 18, 2013
Format: Paperback
One of the most "user-friendly" books on the assassination I've ever read, and the best introduction to the subject for novices.

A Readers Digest roving editor, Hurt's manuscript was reviewed by Harold Weisberg and Sylvia Meagher before it was published. Hurt began his work on the subject when he received a call in 1981 from a man who claimed he had participated in the assassination, Robert Easterling. The chapter on Easterling is the only weak section of the book. He talked to the man and then decided to plunge into "the murk of the Kennedy assassination" to judge his claims. The only previous connection he had had with the subject was in locating and interviewing Marines who had served with Oswald for Edward Epstein's book Legend. He recalled that many of his fellow Marines said Oswald was physically uncoordinated, which made it difficult for him to shoot and was the reason why he didn't drive.

"During the early months of work, I fully expected that at any moment I would encounter that single, unalterable piece of evidence that left no question that Oswald was the man who killed Kennedy....That discovery never came. Instead, the evidence continued to point in a different direction..." "A powerful case can be made that Oswald did not kill Kennedy."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Henry Hurt's "Reasonable Doubt" is an overview of the JFK assassination. Hurt was a researcher for the book "Legend: the Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald" by Edward Epstein. Hurt's research involved little more than contacting US Marines who knew Oswald. After providing research for Epstein, Hurt set aside the JFK case.

In 1981, his odysessy started anew. A man named Robert Easterling contacted him. Easterling was prepared to confess his role in the assassination of President Kennedy. Hurt, in an effort to prepare himself for this unusual interview, Hurt versed himself in the JFK assassination lore.
Hurt's overview of the case is amazing. His prose is easy to follow. His conclusions are logical. The biggest flaw in his research is, unfortunately, the inclusion of the Robert Easterling testimony.

The first chapter reads like a newspaper report. It's nine pages of who, what, where and when. After finishing this, the reader knows the basics of the official story.

Hurt then turns a critical eye to the Warren Commission's findings. There is no index from which to review the Warren Commission's hearings and exhibits. The report is hardly the corrollary of 26 supporting volumes. Congressional committees concluded that the FBI and CIA were derelict in submitting evidence to the Warren Commission. The FBI had destroyed or altered testimony or evidence. Credible leads that pointed away from the Warren Commission's main thesis were ignored.

After concluding the Warren Commission had not settled the issue, Hurt then looks at the autopsy and the Magic Bullet. The doctors in Dallas do not agree with the doctors at Bethesda. The Magic Bullet is pristine whereas test bullets fired into cadavers show significant deformation.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews