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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Book Changed My Life
Not too long ago, I went through a period of serious soul-searching. Something in me told me that God was truth, but I didn't have strong answers to many of the tough questions that troubled me. I had heard atheists make seemingly-good arguments against the existence of God or the truth of Christianity. I had also heard Christians make seemingly-good points, but in my...
Published on March 1, 2010 by Jason D. Coffey

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The best evidentialist
I knew of Craig's own theology before I bought the book, so I was not at all surprised to read about "middle knowledge." But I bought the book for the expert presentation of the classical arguments for the existence of God and Craig delivers the goods. I think the material in the book on all the modern arguments against the existence of God are expertly presented...
Published 13 months ago by Bev Edwards


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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Book Changed My Life, March 1, 2010
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This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
Not too long ago, I went through a period of serious soul-searching. Something in me told me that God was truth, but I didn't have strong answers to many of the tough questions that troubled me. I had heard atheists make seemingly-good arguments against the existence of God or the truth of Christianity. I had also heard Christians make seemingly-good points, but in my ignorance I struggled to discern the truth between the two opposing views. I eventually bought and read a book based on a debate between William Lane Craig and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong. Never before had I seen Christianity defended with such strong philosophical, logical, scientific and historical arguments. I was filled with an intellectual hunger for more information that brought me to this book.

Reasonable Faith has affected me more than any other book except the Bible. It won't answer every question, nor does it try to do so, but it gives the reader a strong foundation for the further study of Christian apologetics. William Lane Craig guides the reader through the history of theological thought, arguments for the existence of God, arguments for the Christian God and historical arguments for the historicity of the risen Christ. His writing style is fluid, captivating, and expresses difficult subject matter in an easily-understood way. His philosophical arguments for natural theology are especially devastating to the naturalistic worldview.

If you only own one book on Christian apologetics or philosophy, it must be this one. I thank God for William Lane Craig's ministry.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WLC Apologetics 101, July 19, 2012
This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
William Lane Craig is great debater and philosopher and this book shows you why. I have watched most of Craig's debates so a lot of the arguments he presented where familiar to me but this book went into greater depths of the arguments he presents in his debates.

Craig will overwhelm you with the vast amount of knowledge his has in multiple subject areas science, history, philosophy, and theology. I really tried to think of any weaknesses this book has and I really can't think of any mainly because Craig backs everything up with at least 30-40 references and sources in each chapter (and not just the Bible for you atheists circular argument type complainers, although he has that in there as well; real scholars!).

His chapters on the Existence of God are the best in my opinion as he lays out the Kalam Cosmological Argument and the evidence for the beginning of the universe, let me sum it up for those non-physicists...Big Bangs have Bangers! Anyway all the chapters are good I also really enjoyed the chapter "How do I know Christianity is true" Plantinga's "properly basic/warranted belief" argument makes alot of sense to me anyways. Obviously as Craig points out the Holy Spirit is the "Ultimate Reason" we know Christianity to be true.

Craig I just have to say cuts through any atheists arguments, he just piles up the fallacies/inconsistencies inherent in them. After reading this book I did realize however non-believers, of which I was a huge one for a long time, just look for any argument or way to avoid God in our lives even though He is the source of Life.

I can say the Christian life is the most Reasonable Way of Life, I know it is difficult at times and most of the World looks at you as some kind of unreasonable crazy person but I am like Paul where he says in

Philippians 3:10-14
10 I want to know Christ and the power of his resurrection and the fellowship of sharing in his sufferings, becoming like him in his death, 11 and so, somehow, to attain to the resurrection from the dead. 12 Not that I have already obtained all this, or have already been made perfect, but I press on to take hold of that for which Christ Jesus took hold of me. 13 Brothers, I do not consider myself yet to have taken hold of it. But one thing I do: Forgetting what is behind and straining toward what is ahead, 14 I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nice apologetic book, June 18, 2011
This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
William Lane Craig's book Reasonable Faith Christian Truth and Apologetics is a clear defense of the Christian faith. People who do not agree with Christianity, but who are interested in: philosophy, science, and history would find it to be a good read. He makes a case for apologetics in the introduction and gives three roles that apologetics takes in our world today. Craig states that apologetics: shapes culture, strengthens believers, and helps in evangelizing unbelievers (16-21). Next, he defines offensive and defensive apologetics and lets the reader know that the book presents an offensive apologetic, which presents positive claims for believing Christianity to be true.

The book is divided into five sections: faith, man, God, creation, and Christ. In the first chapter, Craig shows how figures in history, like Augustine and Thomas Aquinas, have viewed the relationship between faith and reason. He ends the chapter with showing how to apply the knowledge he has covered, and he gives a great message on the role of the Holy Spirit (59). Chapter two gives arguments for how life is absurd without God. Craig believes that if God does not exist, then life has no real ultimate purpose or value. As with the first chapter, Craig sifts through historical arguments and gives an application at the end.

The next two chapters deal with the existence of God. Chapter three discusses ontological, cosmological, teleological, and moral arguments for God's existence. He thoroughly explains each argument and does a good job at defending all of them. He does not just use philosophy to defend his claims. He also uses science to show that the universe had a beginning and that an actually infinite past is impossible in defense of the kalam cosmological argument. In chapter four, which is a continuation of chapter three, Craig gives evidence for the teleological argument by discussing the fine-tuning of the universe.

He argues that the universe is either due to physical necessity, chance, or design. Craig attacks physical necessity and chance and claims design as the best explanation of the facts. As always, Craig puts forth a convincing argument. The only thing one can be critical of is the fact that he did not cover the theories that combine physical necessity and chance. Toward the middle of the chapter he gives a moral argument for the existence of God by appealing to objective moral values and duties. He leaves a bit of room at the end of the chapter to cover the ontological argument, specifically Plantinga's version of it.

The section of the book that comes next is the creation section, and it is comprised of chapters 5 and 6 which deal with the problem of historical knowledge and the problem of miracles. In chapter five, Craig touches on historicism, relativism, and postmodernism in relation to what one can know in regards to history. Two issues that are dealt with in the chapter are the historian's lack of direct access to the past, and the lack of neutrality that permeates historical analyses. He answers the first problem by showing that scientists do not always have direct access to their objects of study. Craig also says that, "while the historian does not have direct access to the past, the residue of the past, things that have really existed, is directly accessible to him" (226). The next thing he does is discuss the nature of historical facts, and how historical hypotheses are tested.

In dealing with the historian's lack of neutrality, Craig gives three reasons why history is not as subjective as relativists claim it to be. His first reason is that there are common facts in history that cannot be disputed. The second reason he gives is that history and propaganda can be clearly separated. He shows that historical relativists indicate that history is somewhat objective when they do not desire propaganda to be put into history. The third point he makes is that history which is poorly done can be criticized. In chapter six, Craig discusses Deists objections to miracles and then gives a Christian defense of miracles.

The last two chapters deal with historical research on Jesus' life and resurrection. Both of the chapters are thoroughly researched. Craig gives a convincing argument that Jesus resurrected from the dead by appealing to three agreed upon facts among scholars: the empty tomb; the postmortem appearances of Jesus; and the origin of Christianity. With each fact, Craig shows viewpoints on both sides of the scholarly spectrum and does not hold back on his opinions of the research of those that deny miracles and the resurrection.

In summation, Reasonable Faith is an introductory book to apologetics that is mostly aimed at seminary students. The clear analysis and in-depth study displayed in the book makes it great for people who are seeking the truth in religious matters, and it is also a good resource for any Christian who wants to know how to apply apologetics in evangelism. Craig's arguments are well formulated and stimulate much thought. The Christian reader will probably find the practical applications at the end of each section very helpful. A great thing about Crag's book is that he shows the importance of apologetics while also noting the limitations of it. His conclusion says it best: "This, then, is the ultimate apologetic. For the ultimate apologetic is-your life."
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rigorous Positive case for Christianity, November 9, 2011
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This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
Reasonable Faith is a philosophically rigorous apologetics book, aimed at both astute laymen and students of apologetics.

Craig comes from the classical apologetics school. That is, he aims to provide positive arguments that show Christianity is true, in two broad steps- by showing that God exists and then by showing that Christ rose from the dead. He spends little to no time criticising opposing worldviews (eg: Naturalism, or nature is all that exists) or responding to arguments against Christianity, unless it is in the context of making his positive case. However for what this book is, it is superb. Craig's discussions of the Kalam Cosmological Argument, Fine-Tuning Argument and Miracles for example, are brilliant in their rigour and depth of argumentation.

Other points of distinction about this book:

- He provides the historical background of each argument, showing how developments in thought and expanding knowledge have influenced the way people think about different arguments. After providing this context, he makes his own case.

- He includes an informal section at the end of each chapter that aims to show the practical relevance of the material he's presented.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best over-all apologetic books focusing on the "heart" of apologia, November 19, 2010
This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
Dr. Craig lays out his arguments in a clear and concise method in this, his life's work where all his other books seem to branch off from. I feel that he takes these point to a foundational level:
1) There is no point to life outside of a God.
2) Origin of the Big Bang's singularity/space/time.
3) The Design inference
4) The Historicity of Christ's ressurection
5) AND the fact that he is NOT an evidentalist (which I think is a MUST for truly being a "Christ-ian.")

No point in going into all of the details, but I was so impressed that I became a chapter leader for Dr. Craig's Reasonable Faith (dot org) chapters. I do believe some of his arguments on probability figures get a tad bit deep/too deep and are not needed; and I do actually like his chapter (I believe in the second edition) on the reliability of Scripture(s); but he preferred not to use these in the 3rd edition, thus I would give this 5 stars if the other chapter was back in this edition with nothing removed. (Without I feel 4.5, which I rounded down to 4). But make no mistake, this is truly a gifted man and a gifted work that still stand un-refuted today, and I feel will in the future as well.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First-rate work on apologetics, January 17, 2009
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This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
William Lane Craig is one of the premier evangelical apologists around. He is amply qualified to write a book such as this. He has a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Birmingham, having studied under Professor John Hick, and a doctorate in theology from the University of Munich, where he studied under Wolfhart Pannenberg,

He also earned twin Master's degrees in Philosophy of Religion and in Church History and the History of Christian Thought. So he clearly is adept at both theology and philosophy. And he is also well abreast of the recent developments in the philosophy of science and related fields.

This is the third edition of this important volume. The first edition came out in 1984, with the second appearing in 1994. Book lovers (especially those on a limited budget) always must ask whether a new edition of a book is worth getting, if an earlier edition is already owned. In this case, the differences between the second and third edition make it well worth purchasing.

The second edition was 350 pages in length, while this edition is 415 pages long. But the second edition had a 40-page chapter on the historical reliability of the New Testament written by Craig Blomberg which has been removed in the newest edition. Thus there are over 100 pages of new material here. For example, the 50-page chapter on the existence of God in the second edition is now expanded into two chapters totalling 110 pages.

Obviously new developments, such as the publication of Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion, and new concepts in the fields of science, physics and cosmology are included in this new edition. But the book still remains a solid and comprehensive case for Christian truth and an invaluable resource for taking on the various objections to theism in general and biblical Christianity in particular.

Other chapters in this volume examine the problem of historical knowledge; the shortcomings of atheism and materialism; the nature of faith; the case for objective morality; the problem of miracles; the messianic awareness of Jesus; and the case for the resurrection.

Consider just one issue - that of morality and various moral arguments for the existence of God. Craig makes the case that if God does not exist, it is extremely difficult to find a foundation for objective moral values and duties. Most people, when pressed, will admit to some objective moral values that are independent of our thoughts or feelings about them.

How can an atheistic or a materialistic worldview account for such moral values and obligations? The more honest naturalists and atheists admit that morality seems to make little sense in their system of thought. Atheistic ethicist Richard Taylor for example says that morality makes sense if there is a moral law-giver (God), but is "not understandable" if no such God exists.

Of course as Craig reminds us, this is not to say that atheists cannot be moral or believe in moral values. It is just that they do not have a solid philosophical basis to do so, given their worldview. Thus a person can seek to live an ethical life without belief in God.

"The argument is not that belief in God's existence is necessary for the objective reality of moral values and duties," says Craig, "but that God is necessary for the objective reality of moral values and duties." People here tend to confuse the reality of morality with beliefs about morality. Moral ontology, in other words, differs from moral epistemology.

Craig argues that various attempts to come up with a non-theistic basis for morality end in failure. Some seek to ground morality in herd behaviour or the replication of selfish genes. Some argue that morality is illusory, fostered in us by socio-biological evolution. Some, like Nietzsche or Sartre, simply give up, and admit that without God we are left without morality as well.

It appears that in a world without a divine law-giver, morality must ultimately be relative, subjective, and based solely on personal and/or cultural preference. But this will not do, since most people will admit that some objective moral acts - such as rape or torturing babies for pleasure - are always wrong, and that these beliefs are not just based on personal taste or cultural consensus.

People may give lip service to cultural relativism, but in the end they tend to agree that some objective moral values and obligations exist. The question then is, which worldview best accounts for this? Craig argues that theism in general and Christianity in particular best does the job here.

Finally, it must be noted that this book - or at least parts of it - is not for the intellectually faint-hearted. For example, the chapter on miracles contains fairly complex and detailed philosophical reasoning, and the chapters on God's existence, including the elaboration on cosmological and teleological arguments, feature scientific and philosophical concepts which some may find heavy going.

But each chapter concludes with a practical application section. Craig at heart is an evangelist and this book is designed to help believers to not only deal with intellectual objections to the Christian faith, but to point people to a Saviour. Thus a careful reading of the book will pay off handsomely.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars TOC, December 26, 2011
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I bought this book for my Kindle wanting to use it as a textbook, the sad thing tough is that the table of contents is not available which is a big bummer. Otherwise brilliant.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars fantastic read so far, September 3, 2012
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This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
I've been enjoying this read from the beginning. I must admit two things however, it is my first read into this field specifically and I am only half way through the book. As such my review can only be partial and perhaps on completion my rating should be amended.

Aside from the above the arguments put forward in this book so far are coherent and exciting. I would recommend this to anyone who is interested in theism and learning more about why one can logically hold to this view. It gives great insight into how one might articulate such reasons in conversation and I have been encouraged deeply in my faith as a result.

William Lane Craig is a respectful and deep thinking Christian. He easily articulates difficult topics and shows an honorable respect for those that would discourage him which for me are telling insights into his worldview and the faith that he holds to. I feel refreshed with every new page read and will be taking away more than just good arguments from this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The best evidentialist, October 23, 2013
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This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
I knew of Craig's own theology before I bought the book, so I was not at all surprised to read about "middle knowledge." But I bought the book for the expert presentation of the classical arguments for the existence of God and Craig delivers the goods. I think the material in the book on all the modern arguments against the existence of God are expertly presented and shows that under scrutiny the atheistic and even the agnostic arguments fail miserably.

Okay, so I don't agree with his evidentialist arguments and his middle knowledge cop-out, but if you are going to argue with naturalists and atheists, you need this fine book. Do not throw the baby out with the bathwater.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Decent work of apologetics, August 5, 2013
This review is from: Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics (Paperback)
William Lane Craig is one of the most well-known proponents of the Christian faith in the world, and I'm pretty sure this is his most well-known work. As the title suggests, Dr. Craig attempts to show the validity of Christianity through rational argumentation. He does a pretty good job of it, for the most part. In the introduction, he informs readers that this is primarily a work of offensive apologetics; that is, showing Christianity to be true rather than defending it from attacks (which is defensive apologetics). Guess I'll just break this down by chapter.

The first chapter is titled "Faith and Reason: How Do I Know Christianity is True?" Craig devotes a large section of this chapter to informing us on the thoughts of ancient and modern theologians about the relationship between faith and reason. I found I could agree with some ideas from Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and John Locke, while others like Dodwell, Barth, and Bultmann seemed to think reasoning about God was worthless. And I'm sorry, but Alvin Plantinga just sounds insane. He's the kind of philosopher who makes me have some sympathy for people like Stephen Hawking who think philosophy has become pretty much worthless. Anyway, Dr. Craig goes on to talk about the role of the Holy Spirit. He seems to believe that it's ultimately the Holy Spirit that persuades people to believe in Christianity, and that reason is a tool to help us better understand and defend our faith. He does point out, though, that the Holy Spirit can work through rational argumentation. I'm inclined to agree, as long as the arguing is kept civil and is done with the right intentions.

The second chapter argues that our lives are completely pointless if there is no God and we are mere mortals. While I sort of agree with him, I'm honestly not sure if I should. I just find there are too many points in this chapter where I don't feel like this is how God wants us to bring people to Him. Also, this chapter is longer than it needed to be. You get his point really quickly and then it just becomes repetitive. Still, there are many times where I find I can't help but think like Craig. Honestly, what is the point of life without God?

The third chapter is dedicated to the classic arguments for the existence of God, and it may be my favorite chapter. He touches on the ontological argument briefly before diving into the cosmological, teleological, and moral arguments. For each of these three, he presents ideas from multiple thinkers, some of which are easier to be persuaded by than others. Thomas Aquinas comes up under all three arguments, since his Five Ways all seem to fit into one of those categories of arguments. I must admit that I have a difficult time seeing the differences between the three versions of the cosmological argument that Craig presents, and furthermore the three Thomist arguments (Aquinas's first three Ways) sound very similar to one another. This doesn't stop Craig from picking his favorite cosmological argument and spending well over half the chapter defending it: the kalam cosmological argument. I must say that I, too, find the cosmological argument to be the most persuasive argument there is for God, despite not fully understanding what makes the kalam argument different. He makes this argument from both a philosophical and a scientific standpoint, addressing objections along the way. I think he does a fabulous job, and that it was probably this argument that led Sam Harris to say that William Lane Craig seems to be the only theologian capable of inflicting the fear of God into the minds of his atheist colleagues.

Chapter 4 addresses objections to miracles. This chapter seems more like defensive apologetics, despite what he said about this book being focused on the offensive. Basically he brings up some old Deist philosophers like Spinoza and Hume and summarizes what they believed, and then he debunks their arguments using the responses of Christians from the same time period. Craig closes the chapter by stating that these debates aren't as relevant today, as nobody today objects to Christianity primarily because of miracles. However, he does say that some just have a hard time imagining that the Christian miracles could have really happened, despite not formulating arguments about their impossibility like the Deists did.

The second half of the book is devoted to the historical evidence for Christianity. Chapter 5 was a total snoozefest for me. Craig essentially argue here that we can use historical evidence to show that things happened. No, really, there are apparently some philosophers out there with some weird objections to that idea. Whatever.

I can't help but find it strange that the sixth chapter wasn't actually written by William Lane Craig. It's all about the historical reliability of the New Testament, and it's written by some guy named Craig L. Blomberg. At first I was turned off by the fact that he briefly bashed on Mormons for thinking that New Testament documents were "substantially corrupted in their transmission" (not sure that what's we really believe), but it ended up being an interesting chapter. This was the first time I had really read about the historical debates about Christianity.

Chapter 7 is about who Jesus understood himself to be. Many Christians argue that Jesus was either a liar, a lunatic, a legend, or the Son of God. He couldn't have been a great moral teacher because a great moral teacher wouldn't lie about who he was. There are some, however, who maintain that Jesus never actually claimed to be the Son of God. Craig argues that, based only on what the vast majority of scholars believe Jesus must have said, that we know Jesus said many things that implied that He believed Himself to be the Son of God.

Chapter 8 argues that Jesus was resurrected. Some of his arguments are more convincing than others, and it's a little hard to follow the logic at times. Craig notes that the kinds of arguments people used to make against Deists to show that the resurrection occurred don't exactly work today. We're living in an age where too many people are persuaded that there is little to no evidence that any events in the Bible ever occurred. Still, it's an interesting chapter that raises valid points.

Overall, this is a fine work of Christian apologetics. I only give it a 4/5 because there are times when Craig's philosophical way of speaking is just overkill, the fifth chapter is incredibly boring, and many old theologians are quoted that have ideas that I can't agree with, sound outdated, or just sound crazy. There are just too many instances where I found myself getting uninterested for me to give it a perfect score. But it's still a well-written and interesting book that I'd say is worth your time (and a little bit of cash).

*******************************************************************************************************

Key Quotes:

"People who simply ride the roller coaster of emotional experience are cheating themselves out of a deeper and richer Christian faith by neglecting the intellectual side of that faith" p. xiv

"The Church is perishing to-day through the lack of thinking, not through an excess of it." (J. Gresham Machen) p. xv

"For it would be the most wondrous sign of all if without any wondrous signs the world were persuaded by simple and lowly men to believe things so arduous [...]" (Thomas Aquinas) p. 22

"The fact is that we can know the truth whether we have rational arguments or not." p. 37

"Conversion is exclusively the role of the Holy Spirit. But the Holy Spirit may use our arguments to draw people to himself." p. 47

"In the first place, don't expect an unbeliever to just roll over and play dead the minute he hears your apologetic argument. Of course, he's going to disagree! Think of what's at stake for him!" p. 50

"Most people still do not reflect on the consequences of atheism and so, like the crowd in the marketplace, go unknowingly on their way." p. 64

"The first step is so intuitively obvious that I think scarcely anyone could sincerely believe it to be false. I therefore think it somewhat unwise to argue in favor of it, for any proof of the principle is likely to be less obvious than the principle itself." (referring to "Whatever begins to exist has a cause") p. 92

"For it is also true that most NT critics agree that Jesus made other claims about himself, claims that imply virtually the same thing as the titles." p. 244

"[Paley] concludes that there is no more reason to doubt that the gospels come from the traditional authors than there is to doubt that the works of Philo or Josephus are authentic, except that the gospels contain supernatural events." p. 257

"More often than not, it is what you are rather than what you say that will bring an unbeliever to Christ. This, then is the ultimate apologetic. For the ultimate apologetic is: your life." p. 302
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Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics
Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and Apologetics by William Lane Craig (Paperback - June 9, 2008)
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