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Reasoning After Revelation: Dialogues In Postmodern Jewish Philosophy (Radical Traditions) Paperback – December 29, 2000


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Product Details

  • Series: Radical Traditions
  • Paperback: 165 pages
  • Publisher: Westview Press (December 29, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813365651
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813365657
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.6 ounces
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,671,029 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Steven Kepnes is associate professor of philosophy and religion and director of Jewish Studies at Colgate University. He was a visiting scholar at the Hebrew University and at the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Jewish Studies from 1993 to 1995. He is author of Interpreting Judaism in a Postmodern Age; The Text as Thou: Martin Buber’s Dialogical Hermeneutics and Narrative Theology and coeditor, with David Tracy, of The Challenge of Psychology to Faith. His articles on Jewish thought have appeared in such journals as the Journal of Jewish Studies, Soundings, and the Harvard Theological Review. He is also Judaism editor for Religious Studies Review. Peter Ochs is the Edgar Bronfman Professor of Modern Judaic Studies at the University of Virginia, and co-founder of the Societies for Textual Reasoning, and for Scriptural Reasoning. He is the author of Pierce, Pragmatism, and the Logic of Scripture, and the coauthor of Reviewing the Covenant: Eugene Borowitz and the Postmodern Renewal of Theology. He is the author or editor of a number of works on the relations between rabbinic and American varieties of pragmatism and semiotics, and between Jewish and Christian theologies. Robert Gibbs teaches philosophy at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Correlations in Rosenzweig and Levinas, and most recently of Why Ethics: Signs of Responsibilities. His work addresses Jewish Philosophy in the tradition of Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, and Emmanuel Levinas and engages both contemporary Continental thought and American pragmatism. Tikva Frymer-Kensky is Professor of Hebrew Bible at the Divinity School at the University of Chicago. David Novak holds the J. Richard and Dorothy Shiff Chair of Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. Peter Ochs is the Edgar Bronfman Professor of Modern Judaic Studies at the University of Virginia. David Sandmel is the Jewish Scholar at the Institute for Christian and Jewish Studies in Baltimore. Michael A. Signer is Abrams Professor of Jewish Thought and Culture in the Department of Theology at University of Notre Dame. Steven Kepnes is associate professor of philosophy and religion and director of Jewish Studies at Colgate University. He was a visiting scholar at the Hebrew University and at the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Jewish Studies from 1993 to 1995. He is author of Interpreting Judaism in a Postmodern Age; The Text as Thou: Martin Buber’s Dialogical Hermeneutics and Narrative Theology and coeditor, with David Tracy, of The Challenge of Psychology to Faith. His articles on Jewish thought have appeared in such journals as the Journal of Jewish Studies, Soundings, and the Harvard Theological Review. He is also Judaism editor for Religious Studies Review. Peter Ochs is the Edgar Bronfman Professor of Modern Judaic Studies at the University of Virginia, and co-founder of the Societies for Textual Reasoning, and for Scriptural Reasoning. He is the author of Pierce, Pragmatism, and the Logic of Scripture, and the coauthor of Reviewing the Covenant: Eugene Borowitz and the Postmodern Renewal of Theology. He is the author or editor of a number of works on the relations between rabbinic and American varieties of pragmatism and semiotics, and between Jewish and Christian theologies. Robert Gibbs teaches philosophy at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Correlations in Rosenzweig and Levinas, and most recently of Why Ethics: Signs of Responsibilities. His work addresses Jewish Philosophy in the tradition of Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, and Emmanuel Levinas and engages both contemporary Continental thought and American pragmatism.

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