Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $1.97 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Rebels Against The Future... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ex libris with a few markings. Solid text.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Rebels Against The Future: The Luddites And Their War On The Industrial Revolution: Lessons For The Computer Age Paperback – April 17, 1996


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.03
$7.93 $1.72


Frequently Bought Together

Rebels Against The Future: The Luddites And Their War On The Industrial Revolution: Lessons For The Computer Age + The Radical Reader: A Documentary History of the American Radical Tradition
Price for both: $36.78

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Interested in Cloud Computing?
Run virtually everything in the cloud. Web Apps, Big Data, and more. Get started for free!

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; Pbk. Ed edition (April 17, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201407183
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201407181
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #687,101 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Legendary Englishman Ned Ludd hated work so much that his master whipped him, whereupon he took revenge by destroying his knitting frame. In 1812, his followers, the Luddites?weavers, combers, dressers of wool and artisans?banded together to fight with pike and gun "progress, or what was held to be progress." With the introduction of the Industrial Revolution, their former way of life was ending. The Luddites took their stand in Nottingham at the factory of one William Cartwright. The retribution, according to the author, "called forth the greatest spasm of repression Britain ever in its history used against domestic dissent." Sale draws distinct portraits of both sides. The Luddites, reminiscent of the quixotic Irish Fenians of the 1860s, fought not only for survival but also for principle, sacrificing their lives for land and better conditions for laborers. The mill owners and politicians, on the other hand, were anti-union, pro-child labor, polluters of stream and sky and in favor of mass deforestation and demanded 10- to 18-hour workdays. Sale (The Conquest of Paradise) also displays the Luddites' situation in a modern context when he compares the Industrial Revolution to the information superhighway, situations "with unprecedented technological consequences." He has done a magnificent job of showing us the past and given us a peek into our future.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

For a brief 15 months from late 1811 to early 1813, the Luddites challenged central England's law and order. This unique attack by workers upon a segment of the first industrial revolution, the manufacture of textiles, is meticulously covered by Sale in a chronological manner. Sale, a founder of the New York Green Party and author of The Green Revolution (LJ 7/93), constructs a list of principles from the Luddites' actions and the political-economic-legal response, which he applies to our present time in the last quarter of the book. Here Sale attacks the computer and its intrusion into our lives and the world's environment and economics. Essential for history of science collections and recommended for others.
Michael D. Cramer, Virginia Polytechnic & State Univ. Libs, Blacksburg
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Barron Laycock HALL OF FAME on June 16, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Rebels Against The Future" is a book with an important, relevant, and timely message. Written by Kirkpatrick Sales, a long-time editor of "The Nation", the book describes the historical struggle for human rights against the forces of technological innovation by way of the saga of Ned Ludd & his followers. By detailing this example, the author illustrates how difficult it is, both historically and culturally, for individual workers & ordinary people to successfully come to terms with the anonymous and often overwhelming forces of an intractable and self-propelled technical dynamic; industrial progress.

I first came across this book last year by way of the internet; an excerpt of it was posted on a neo-Luddite site I was browsing through. Reading this short portion hooked me on Mr. Sales' writing style and substance. This is a book ostensibly devoted to the iconoclastic revolt by a small but determined group of nineteenth century English cottage workers against the hurtful introduction of new machines that, in essence, deprived them of an opportunity to make a living and support themselves and their families. It was the first documented account of a group rebelling against the enforced imposition by industrialists of new technology that was contrary to their own social and economic interests. It was not all machinery that the so-called "Luddites" rebelled against; it was only those technological innovations "but all Machinery hurtful to Commonality". He forwards an impressive, multi-faceted argument; each facet of the argument bearing on various aspects of what the author associates with various characteristics of technologies.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Dorn on February 12, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Years ago I was sitting in traffic on the South East Expressway in Boston, MA. I had just spent the better part of the day fixxing automobiles for people. That was my job. That is what I do. Trying to get home so I could "relax" was a chore. I lived maybe 30 min. away from my work but spent better than an hour just sitting in the hot July sun while the conjested traffic inched it's way along slowly, burning precious fossile fuel, spewing carbon & other noxious fumes into the air surrounding Boston. I was not happy. I called my wife on our ancient "Bag Phone". We discussed moving out of the Boston metro region so we could slow down the pace, relax a bit more and just enjoy life.

I had a Luddite moment. I realized then that I was working hard to keep all this technology together just so people could get to their own jobs to earn the money needed to keep their technology working. It dawned on me how futile all this stress and effort are... We are killing ourselves to support technology and all the time fooling ourselves with the idea that this modern life style is somehow better than in the good old days. I did not have an urge to smash any machines but I did want to stop the world and get off. Am I really any happier now than I would be if I were a village blacksmith in 1812? What do I really need to be happy? What does all this wonderful modern technology really cost me in blood, sweat and tears? I cash my paycheck, buy food and fuel, pay my bills, look at the remainder and wonder if that 1812 blacksmith was any worse off, realatively than I am today.

Sales book chronicles a moment in the history of labor struggle. Make of it what you will... He has documented a story that needs to be told if we as a society are to look at the big picture of ourselves and ask...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Barron Laycock HALL OF FAME on June 21, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Rebels Against The Future" is a book with an important, relevant, and timely message. Written by Sales Kirkpatrick, long-time editor of "The Nation", who describes the historical struggle for human rights against the forces of technological innovation by way of the saga of Ned Ludd & his followers. By detailing this example, the author illustrates how difficult it is, both historically and culturally, for individual workers & ordinary people to successfully come to terms with the anonymous and often overwhelming forces of an intractable and self-propelled technical dynamic; industrial progress.
I first came across this book last year by way of the internet; an excerpt of it was posted on a neo-Luddite site I was browsing through. Reading this short portion hooked me on Mr. Kirkpatrick's writing style and substance. This is a book ostensibly devoted to the iconoclastic revolt by a small but determined group of nineteenth century English cottage workers against the hurtful introduction of new machines that, in essence, deprived them of an opportunity to make a living and support themselves and their families. It was the first documented account of a group rebelling against the enforced imposition by industrialists of new technology that was contrary to their own social and economic interests. It was not all machinery that the so-called "Luddites" rebelled against; it was only those technological innovations "but all Machinery hurtful to Commonality". He
forwards an impressive, multi-faceted argument; each facet of the argument bearing on various aspects of what the author associates with various characteristics of technologies.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?