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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Different and Awesome. Open your mind.
This album is an obvious departure to what everyone knows 'Lil Wayne' for- that is, his unique rap vocals mixed with his hard-edged 'explicit' and sometimes extremely sexual lyrics. His creativity and talent is undeniable as he completely flips the script with his eccentric, yet vividly emotional collaboration with other well known artists. The tracks recorded for this...
Published on November 14, 2010 by Teddi

versus
70 of 83 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One of the worst albums ever made
Please believe me, I am not saying this is one of the worst albums ever made because I'm a Wayne hater. I really do like Wayne as a rapper. But this album is just plain messy and should never have been made.

The concept for this album clearly came about while Wayne was on an extended weed, ecstasy, and syrup binge, and he truly believed that he could become...
Published on February 4, 2010 by Dave


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70 of 83 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One of the worst albums ever made, February 4, 2010
By 
This review is from: Rebirth (Audio CD)
Please believe me, I am not saying this is one of the worst albums ever made because I'm a Wayne hater. I really do like Wayne as a rapper. But this album is just plain messy and should never have been made.

The concept for this album clearly came about while Wayne was on an extended weed, ecstasy, and syrup binge, and he truly believed that he could become the next big rock star. He couldn't have been more wrong. There are some artists that can expand beyond their original area of expertise and become successful in other artistic endeavors (Will Smith and Jamie Foxx for example). Wayne is not one of these artists.

Everything about this album just doesn't work. The music and lyrics are the embodiment of the most obvious of rock cliches, the mixing and sequencing are beyond sloppy, and Wayne's auto-tune-aided "singing" is downright horrible. Wayne decided to take the most superficial elements of mainstream modern rock radio, puree them in a blender, and record the result. Except instead of a delicious smoothie we're left with a glass of vomit.

Rebirth is an embarrassment, for the listener and especially for Wayne. This is truly one of those "WTF was he THINKING???" moments that comes around every few years when a successful artist vastly overestimates his abilities. It is a disturbing example of what can happen when an artist becomes delusional to the point of borderline psychosis and is given free reign to unleash his confused, drug-induced ramblings on the public.

Rebirth does have one redeeming quality, however. There is the William Hung novelty factor of listening to this. The album that is so horrendous that it becomes comical. Listening to this album, I couldn't help but laugh and laugh HARD. Rebirth would fare much better as a comedy album, and it should be marketed as such. The novelty factor is what elevates Rebirth from 0 stars to 1 star.
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36 of 43 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Lil Wayne - Rebirth 1/10, February 9, 2010
This review is from: Rebirth (Audio CD)
There's a scene in the 2009 documentary The Carter where the film's main subject, Lil Wayne, fresh off a cough syrup-fueled, barely coherent recording session, tells the interviewer just how he wants to become king of the music world: "To be an ultimate artist, I believe you have to be like me, I try to do everything . . . when you be lookin' for a Lil Wayne album, you gonna be lookin' for the best rap, the best singin', the best songs . . . full of music, I want you to look for that, not just what you look for now . . . I'm re-creating the face of music period . . . that's how I want to be, I do everything good." Throughout much of the documentary, Lil Wayne is incredibly hard to understand, but here the directive is painfully clear. It's the kind of hubris that allows an album like Rebirth to get made, the kind of egomania that causes studio heads to shut their mouths and let the pint-sized New Orleans rapper try to branch out like an overzealous marketer. The Carter shows a man oblivious to the opinions of those around him and confident only in that he is the best there is, wherever, whenever, in whatever. Likewise, Rebirth is the kind of album only the painfully oblivious could make.

His so-called "rock" album, it's clear right off the bat that Lil Wayne is not only deluding himself from everyday reality but also from what constitutes rock `n roll, at least in this day and age. From the hilariously `80s, Guitar Hero-esque solo intro of opener "American Star" to the obscenely grating breakup anthem "The Price Is Wrong," everything here points to Rebirth as a colossal f***up of the highest order, a misjudgment of talent and ideas that any label exec not blinded by Tha Carter III's huge sales should have vetoed within seconds. Listening to the entire twelve tracks, it's nearly impossible to see just how Wayne okayed this; then again, this is the same man who declared that, if he was President, he would "make prostitution legal in about five more states [and] put cocaine back in Coca-Cola," among many other revolutionary changes.

The rapping, the hilariously generic instruments and beats, the "singing;" everything here speaks to a man with only the vaguest idea of how rock `n roll really works. Going from an Auto-Tuned, maniacal version of Billy Corgan to his typically unintelligible Louisiana patois, Wayne runs the gamut from pimping drugs to pimping women to moaning over heartbreak to celebrating the rock star lifestyle with the same general speed and fury, shifting only a few degrees in tone over the course of the album and essentially making every vocal performance he puts down sound eerily the same. Needless to say, Wayne's vocals are hardly suitable for singing; listening to him moan out "oh no this ain't paradise" and squeal out his best pained Nickelback imitation on "Paradice" or try out nu-metal on "Ground Zero" is an exercise in grueling, herculean patience.

Even discounting Wayne himself, there's precious little to like here, largely due to the producers' insistence to make every track sound as bombastic and outsized as Creed on a stadium tour with absolutely zero attention to subtlety of any kind. Every guitar here screams out vulgar solos, the drums seem miked for an arena regardless of the song, and the unvarying verse-chorus-verse chorus would make Puddle of Mudd cringe in shame. Even the tracks that are mildly listenable succeed simply because Wayne stays away: Eminem's ace guest spot on "Drop The World" saves a forgettable song, and "Knockout" is easily the most enjoyable song on the album thanks to Nicki Minaj and not Wayne singing the majority of the verses. Or maybe it's just because the tune rips its riff right off blink-182's "Dammit." Hell, I'll take what I can get.

Perhaps the most telling line in The Carter comes near the three-quarter mark, when Lil Wayne, in response to a question about the explicit nature of some of his songs, remarks, "I don't care about no one's thoughts, no one's thoughts matter to me, at all." It's the purest definition of Lil Wayne himself, an enigma who drowns himself in cough syrup but retains the ability to memorize all of his many songs without a single notebook and recreate them flawlessly. In a way, Rebirth is a tragic album for a soon-to-be-tragic figure; now that Lil Wayne is facing numerous drug and weapon charges from the past two years, he will soon have to take responsibility for his increasingly reckless actions. Now if only the music industry could stand up and have him take responsibility for this abortion of a record, there might be some real justice in the world.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I waited almost 2 years for this?!, February 3, 2010
This review is from: Rebirth (Audio CD)
As the title of my review suggests, I am pretty disappointed. Of course some fans will like it, however this "crossover Rock album" just doesn't do it for me.

You have to give Lil Wayne credit for personally exploring new areas and styles, but this album is completely counter to his previous releases and what has made him popular/prolific. You no longer have Lil Wayne with catchy beats and explosive/clever/raw freestyles or verses. Instead you have a simple guitar tune with him whining the entire time. There are very few freestyles/actual verses... he just seems to mostly repeat the chorus over and over and over in what sounds like an Akon or Kanye West (808 album) wanna-be whining noise. I just don't understand...

The only good song in my opinion is the track he performed with Eminem during the Grammys... and even it is iffy.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why was this released after Prom Queen failed?, February 4, 2010
This review is from: Rebirth (Audio CD)
This album is medicore at best and horrible on any given day. The beats are very basic and I feel if he were going for a rock theme they could at least used better beat. My second problem with this ablum is that his lyrics are weak. I have heard Lil Wayne's mixtapes that were better, his metaphors are horrible also. It sounds as if he were making "high music". 1 of the 2 songs I actually like Drop the world, the only reason I like it was Em's verse inwhich he killed Lil Wayne. This album is not worth buying may while serving time The Carter 4 will be better since it cannot get worse.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars WTF Wanye!!!!, February 4, 2010
This review is from: Rebirth (Audio CD)
What is this? OMG im sorry but Lil Wayne is falling off. Somebody hit me up when the Carter 4 comes out, cause I enjoy rap IDK what this was. I can't stand when rapper turn into singers I just don't get it. O and whats make its worst he pushed the album back so many times and look at the outcome. If your a fan of Lil Wayne I don't blame you for supporting him, but if you are not a Lil Wayne fan don't buy this album. Prom Queen was wack and the new single On fire is worst.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Common Weezy...This Is Horrible It Sounds like A Dog Crying In Pain, February 2, 2010
This review is from: Rebirth (Audio CD)
Not really sure what Weezy was thinkin when he did this, but please stick with rapping, and get rid of thaat darn auto tune, please stay with rapping cause you are the best rapper and let the rock stars do the rock music
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars "Best Rapper Alive" should stick to Rap, February 3, 2010
This review is from: Rebirth (Audio CD)
Last year, Lil Wayne's No Ceilings mixtape, in which he took ownership of 2009 hits such as "Run this Town" and "Throw it in the Bag" away from his contemporaries, was highly regarded by critics and fans for its complete lack of auto-tune as much as its clever punchlines and obtuse metaphors. Wayne's newest release (as well as his first studio recording since Carter III) Rebirth is sort of an extension of the experimental side that was hinted at on that album and his other recent work. It's sort of like his inverse answer to Chris Cornell's Scream; it's am answer which no one asked for though, and sadly the ending result makes the comparison between the two albums uncomfortably appropriate.

Admirably, Wayne is anything but shy taking his brand in various unexplored directions on Rebirth, even doing his own instrumentation in some areas. However whatever novelty-factor that remains of hearing Lil Wayne singing thrash-metal or playing a guitar is quickly drowned out by its own outdated sound, running the gamut sonically from watered down and cheesy mid 1990s alternative radio jams to pre-Appetite For Destruction hair metal ballads. Production-wise, Rebirth is able to boast names such the The J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League and Travis Barker as well as other contributors, which makes it all the more disappointing that the songs seem to just run together.

Except of course for all of Rebirth's meddling excursions into new territory, which meet a similar level of mediocrity. The tragically corny "Get a Life" does a punk-polka dance in the dead middle of the album that doesn't need to be heard too many more times than once. "One-way-trip" has a light industrial influence and features a seething keyboard riff which sounds like a rehash of something from The Fragile.

The worst part is that all the monotonous clutter makes very little room for any standout tracks. One of those being "On-Fire" in which Wayne croons over an Amy Holland sample that any fan of Scarface or Grand Theft Auto 3 will instantly recognize. However its the anxiously-worked drums that qualify this as a long standing club favorite. "Drop the World" features a dauntless Eminem, whose double time flow is a welcome relief from whatever Wayne is doing for the rest of the song-even if his verse is only about "walls closing in" and various other long clichéd subject matter. If anything, its a reminder of how out-of-place Wayne sounds with this material, and how uneven the rest of the album is.

Grade: D
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars WTF Wayne!!!!, February 4, 2010
What is this? OMG im sorry but Lil Wayne is falling off. Somebody hit me up when the Carter 4 comes out, cause I enjoy rap IDK what this was. I can't stand when rapper turn into singers I just don't get it. O and whats make its worst he pushed the album back so many times and look at the outcome. If your a fan of Lil Wayne I don't blame you for supporting him, but if you are not a Lil Wayne fan don't buy this album. Prom Queen was wack and the new single On fire is worst.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars SELL OUT, February 8, 2010
This review is from: Rebirth (Audio CD)
Media sellout. He didnt stay true to his skill. The album is a futile attempt of trying to please everyone, but its just garbage if you like the old wayne. Two thumbs down
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Beyond Disappointment, February 3, 2010
Nothing really to say, other than it was such a let down. I have not found one song worth listening to more than once (once may be pushing it). Based the purchase decision from his past stuff. Should have listened online to see how much different it was compared to his past work. Think this is my last lil wayne purchase.

I'll listen to the whole CD a couple more times to see if anything sticks, just hard to listen to it without wanting to skip the songs after 20 seconds.

Make sure to listen to it prior to purchasing!
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Rebirth
Rebirth by Lil Wayne (Audio CD - 2010)
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