Recipe for America and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Recipe for America: Why Our Food System is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It [Paperback] Unknown Binding – January 1, 2009


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$18.00 $42.98
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • ASIN: B003TF25TM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Jill Richardson became interested in food initially as a way to stay healthy. At the same time, she was working in health care and she saw many patients who were sick with chronic diet-related illnesses. It occurred to Jill that preventing diet-related illness makes far more sense than sickening ourselves with food and then trying to cure them at great cost (in money and quality of life).

Jill's first book, Recipe for America, shows her plan to reform our food system. Jill is the founder of the sustainable food and agriculture blog La Vida Locavore and she serves on the policy advisory board of the Organic Consumers Association.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Any community food organizer would benefit from reading Jill's book.
Sherilin R. Heise
Her personal examples of how she came to make this topic her life's work were so easily readable and helped pull me in to the book.
J. D. Savage
Jill does a great job demystifying the political and economic influences and systems built around America's food system.
I. Miller

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Smith on July 23, 2009
Format: Paperback
Recipe for America: Why Our Food System is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It

Jill Richardson's new book is a must-read for anyone who puts food into their mouth. She daringly takes on Agribiz and all it entails (genetic modification, CAFOs, ecological damage and ridiculously inefficient petroleum-based fertilizers) and counters their claims with evidence that high-yield, sustainable organic methods are not only possible, but absolutely essential if we are to solve the problems of hunger and malnutrition worldwide. You won't look at your plate the same way after reading Recipe For America -- and your food is going to taste a whole lot better afterward too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Peter Flom on August 10, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is an outstanding book. It will do three things: Inform, enrage, empower. Unless you are a super-expert, I'm betting you will learn some things from this book. It will make you angry, but it will also empower you to take action on a variety of levels.

We can have a food system that is healthier, *much* better for the planet, and that produces food that is tastier. It needn't even be that expensive. It just takes some fundamental changes that Jill Richardson outlines in this book.

There are many good books on the disastrous state of our food system. This book has some features the others lack; for one thing, it's short. That's a good thing. You can always read more, and you can get hints of what else to read from this book. But it packs a lot into its 200 pages or so.

It's also well-written and not too technical. This isn't a book of minutiae or scientific detail (although it doesn't ignore science by any means!) it's a book for people who want to learn what's wrong and what they can do to fix it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By snowy owl books on August 18, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book gives us a brief overview of the food system and all it's inter-related problems with broad issues of health, environment, economy and politics. Each chapter is infused with good statistical information and first hand accounts by the author to explore and de-mystify some of the complex issues- labeling, GMOs , etc. The book ends abruptly with a short conclusion and appendix on encourageing web sites that advocate for sustainable food production in various ways. Though the information is well organized I find the political internet activisim for broad based policy isn't enough to handle the conclusion of such a book that offers a 'recipe' for a compendium of problems. What I want to know is more about the role of activisim- how people change and shape policy, what works well and hasn't. Get to the heart of the problem. Publicity. If we are going to write letters to congress we do so because someone has motivated and informed us of the urgent need to do so. Unfortunately, not all of us are exploring food issues on the internet. How do we get the word out most effectively?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By I. Miller on August 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
Jill Richardson is a young, new author, but her work in Recipe for America comes across as an experienced, well-read and savvy author. Jill does a great job demystifying the political and economic influences and systems built around America's food system. Unlike other authors, she is so bold as propose complete and viable solutions to the problems facing our society's relationships with food and health. It's clear that Jill speaks from the progressive voice of American politics, but food security and safety is something that anyone with children (or anyone that eats for that matter) can get behind.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Porter on July 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
[...]

Once upon a time in America we were all promised a future where there would be "better living through chemistry". Well here we are. It's the future. And the better living future we're experiencing is chock full of unexpected consequences.

Jill Richardson's new book, Recipe For America, is filled with stories about those consequences. As a contributor with Daily Kos and La Vida Locavore, she's made her mark covering issues that relate to the food chain. She gets the connections between obesity and the current health care crisis. She makes the connections between policy and reality. And she's offered up a paperback that backs up the horror stories with plans, goals and resources so that those of us who care about these issues can begin the process of taking our food chain out of the hands of those who put profits before people.

I sat down with Jill last week in San Diego to talk about the release of her book and her plans for the future. She explained to me that the purpose in writing the book was to help people make the connection between the sorts of personal actions they're making (like planting gardens & buying organic) and the broader policy issues that have led to a crisis that has implications for the entire planet.

All this better living we've been sold means that, along with the facade that we're "eatin' good in the neighborhood", the obesity rate for Americans more than doubled over the last three decades--and it tripled for children aged 6 - 11. Four of the top ten leading causes of death are directly related to diet. Our per-person expenditures for health care have also doubled over the last three decades.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search