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Comment: Shared Knowledge is a not for profit public charity! Check us out on facebook. We provide funding for educational programs in Richmond, Virginia. PLEASE READ FULL DESCRIPTION -USED GOOD- This book has been read and may show wear to the cover and or pages. There may be some dog-eared pages. In some cases the internal pages may contain highlighting/margin notes/underlining or any combination of these markings. The binding will be secure in all cases. This is a good reading and studying copy and has been verified that all pages are legible and intact. If the book contained a CD it is not guaranteed to still be included. Your purchase directly supports our scholarship program as well as our partner charities. All items are packed and shipped from the Amazon warehouse. Thanks so much for your purchase!
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Reclaiming the American Revolution: The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions and Their Legacy Paperback – March 4, 2008


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Reclaiming the American Revolution: The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions and Their Legacy + James Madison: Writings: Writings 1772-1836 (Library of America)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; First Edition edition (March 4, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230602576
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230602571
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,077,268 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"With historical knowledge that one can only wish more could possess, Watkins has brought our attention back to Jefferson's and Madison's constitutional commentary in the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions of 1798-1800 and their illuminating relation to American history."--Clyde N. Wilson, Professor of History, University of South Carolina
"With Reclaiming the American Revolution, we have a thorough, thoughtful, and important study of a significant subject that has been too long neglected."--Joyce O. Appleby, Professor of History, UCLA; past president of Organization of American Historians and American Historical Association
"William Watkins' important book, Reclaiming the American Revolution, is intriguing and controversial: it is based on much research, and it is full of interest for the questions it raises about federal-state relations."--Robert L. Middlekauf, Preston Hotchkiss Professor of American History, University of California, Berkeley

From the Inside Flap

“With historical knowledge that one can only wish more could possess, Watkins has brought our attention back to Jefferson’s and Madison’s constitutional commentary in the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions of 1798-1800 and their illuminating relation to American history.
--Clyde N. Wilson, Professor of History, University of South Carolina

“With Reclaiming the American Revolution, we have a thorough, thoughtful, and important study of a significant subject that has been too long neglected.”
--Joyce O. Appleby, Professor of History, UCLA; past president of Organization of American Historians and American Historical Association

“William Watkins’ important book, Reclaiming the American Revolution, is intriguing and controversial: it is based on much research, and it is full of interest for the questions it raises about federal-state relations.”
--Robert L. Middlekauf, Preston Hotchkiss Professor of American History, University of California, Berkeley

“Reclaiming the American Revolution is a provocative invitation to rethink the nature of contemporary American government in the light of the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions. William Watkins’ brisk and panoramic account of American constitutionalism reminds us of the political possibilities open to courageous and spirited citizens who are dedicated to responsible liberty under the rule of law.”
--Herman Belz, Professor of History, University of Maryland

“Those of us who are alarmed by the recent incursions into personal freedom are indebted to William Watkins for Reclaiming the American Revolution, his penetrating and insightful account of how Jefferson and Madison reacted to a situation of equal peril to liberty. We could not do better than to remind ourselves of how they responded when faced with a crisis no less grievous.”
--Ronald Hamowy, Professor of History, University of Alberta; editor, Cato’s Letters: Essays on Liberty by John Trenchard and Thomas Gordon

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By G. F Gori on April 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
William Watkins "Reclaiming the American Revolution" is a great study of the Alien and Sedition Acts and Jefferson and Madison's Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions. Watkins traces the conflict between the Federalist monocrats and the Jeffersonian republicans during the 1790's. Jefferson and Madison are shown in their true glory as liberatian defenders of the principles of the American Revolution, the "spirit of 1776" as Jefferson put it. As the Federalist Party began to institute tyrannical measures like the Sedition Act and Alien bill to cripple the Jeffersonians, Jefferson and Madison conceived of measures to defended the rights of the states and the people.
Watkins also goes into detail about the nature of the Federal government, the original intent of it's framers and the effect the Virginia and Kentucy Resolutions had on the Nullification dispute between South Carolina and the Federal government in 1832. Anyone interested in the principles of liberty, and the American founding will love this book.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By ZXZXZX on August 4, 2005
Format: Hardcover
It's difficult in the modern era, even with the internet and all the literature available, to gain an accurate and honest understanding of the early history of what would become the American Republic. As a product of the public school system, I had to work extra hard to unlearn all the nonsense I'd been taught in what I now see as government run indoctrination camps(the schools "teach" enough info to the kids to prevent them from someday thinking critically about the structure of their government).

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America (1776) essentially declared (aside from the slavery issue) that governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed. People have an unalienable right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and the people can throw off governments which become destructive of these ends and form new governments based on these principles. Essentially, the people are the "ultimate sovereigns" (in the words of Watkins), and elected respesentatives hold only legislative sovereignty. THESE ARE THE CORE PRINCIPLES OF SELF-GOVERNMENT.

The Principles of the Resolutions essentially answer a question which I believe is more relevant today than ever... what defense do the people have against a central government which doesn't abide by it's rules or by restraints and limitations on it's powers? The Answer, according to Jefferson primarily, was for the State houses to interpose between the Federal government and citizens and to declare Federal usurpations of power which overstep the enumerated powers outlined in Article I Section VIII as void and of no force (nullification).
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Aaron J. Baker on June 29, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Rarely do you hear about the critical importance of the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions. We hear of the Constitution, Declaration of Independence, and the Bill of Rights. But I would say the average American citizen is ignorant concerning these documents.

Watkins does a tremendous job combining the history of these resolutions with the political ingenuity of both Madison and Jefferson. I guarantee that when you finish reading this book your knowledge will increase regarding the Constitution and how our founding fathers systematically dealt with the issue of sovereignty. Where does it reside? The difference between legislative sovereignty and ultimate sovereignty. He presents a balanced presentation of both views: those who support a strong centralized government with a broad interpretation of the constitution, versus those who were strong States' Rights advocates and a limited interpretation of the constituion. After presenting a concise yet thorough history of the resolutions he describes the effects of resolutions and how succeeding presidential administrations and state legislatures appealed to the resolutions to prevent encroachments. And he ends with a beautiful application to our day and how the government has constantly overstepped its constitutional boundaries and what we should do. And then he adds his own ideas as to what we can do as a people to make sure our rights stay in tact. In other words, he presents the problem and the solution.

Watkins makes bold comments in relation to how the framers interpreted the Constitution and how to remedy the encroachments of the national government. But every, and I mean every bold assertion is backed by tangible evidence.
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