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Reclaiming the Bible for the Church Paperback – November 17, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 150 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury T&T Clark; 1 edition (November 17, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0567085333
  • ISBN-13: 978-0567085337
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.2 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,941,612 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In this polemical book, nine academically affiliated scholars respond to what they agree is a crisis of biblical authority that is also a crisis of interpretation and, more exactly, a struggle for control of the institutional authority to interpret Scripture. The problem, as they see it, is that historical-critical methods have come to be the province of scholars whose allegiance is to institutions other than the church. Biblical interpretation, they agree, is a theological matter, a matter of faith rather than of academic criticism. Some of their criticism aims at quite specific targets--the Jesus Seminar, Episcopal Bishop John Spong, and the recent Evangelical Lutheran Church in America statement on human sexuality. Most of it is a more diffuse, often defensive discussion of how to control the corrosive force of historical criticism. Interesting as a nonfundamentalist criticism of modern biblical scholarship, the collection may provoke useful thought on the possibility of critical space amid institutions (academic, religious, and otherwise) more inclined to be self-reproducing than to cultivate critical reflection. Steve Schroeder --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Review

"The various chapters in this excellent book, summarised as to leading themes by editors in the introduciton, orginated as conference papers which addressed the question: can the Bible still speak to the Church in an age of critical historical awareness? It is a book which will repay careful reading by all those concerned to maintain or restore an intergral connection between Bible and Church while retaining also a personal integrity of intellect and spirit. There are eight essays in all, each addressing the central question in its own unique manner."—Colm O Baoill, University of Aberdeen, Scottish Journal of Theology (Colm O'Baoill Scottish Journal Of Theology)

"The various chapters in this excellent book, summarised as to leading themes by editors in the introduciton, orginated as conference papers which addressed the question: can the Bible still speak to the Church in an age of critical historical awareness? It is a book which will repay careful reading by all those concerned to maintain or restore an intergral connection between Bible and Church while retaining also a personal integrity of intellect and spirit. There are eight essays in all, each addressing the central question in its own unique manner."—Colm O Baoill, University of Aberdeen, Scottish Journal of Theology (Sanford Lakoff Scottish Journal Of Theology)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By matt on September 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
In the listed review of this book, the reviewer states that this book is, "Interesting as a non-fundamentalist criticism of modern biblical scholarship [and that] the collection may provoke useful thought on the possibility of critical space amid institutions (academic, religious, and otherwise) more inclined to be self-reproducing than to cultivate critical reflection." Elsewhere he writes, "Biblical interpretation, they agree, is a theological matter, a matter of faith rather than of academic criticism."
In my reading of the book, the given reviewer both misses that point and proves the book's point. The authors, all well respected scholars of international standing, take issue with the current trend in many seminaries and universities of approaching the scriptures from the starting point that they cannot possibly be true in any real way. This is why the previous review misses the point. The authors are not against using their brains or modern scholarship, but they ask, "What exactly is scholarship?" I would ask the reviewer if he has ever actually read what Spong or the Jesus Seminar put out. If that is honest scholarship, then the academic community is serious trouble.
Donfried's essay, along with the others, takes issue with the politicization of scriptural interpretation. Is it honest scholarship to have an agenda that clearly is not based upon the text and then to read the bias into the meaning of the text only to act surprised that, in fact, the scriptures claim Jesus was just a pale Galilean who, had he lived just a bit more, would have seen things differently?
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Erica on March 13, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had to buy this book for a class. Though the information and ideas were good, I felt the book was rather academic when the point of it is to bring the Bible back into the church and out of academia.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark Blackstad on October 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
While I did not completely agree wit Spong's book, which is a major reason I picked this book up, I found many interesting things in his ideas. Reclaiming the Bible for the Church reeks of "everything that guy just said is wrong" with little critical insight. The remainder of the book is 20 years of Sunday school with the line carefully toed by the authors (plural... this is more of a compilation . It provides little of interest or unique to anyone who has been a regular church attender. That said, it is not badly written and flows pretty well in spite of the the different styles of writing from the different authors. If you like reruns then this may be the book for you. Frankly it is vastly overpriced for opinions you can find free on the web (even if less well written).
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