Customer Reviews


19 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lot like the first but plenty good
I basically love everything by this developer including any recycled mechanics and the implication that you will need to replay the game to get the true end. I prefer cross edge honestly, but overall this is a solid game. I am dissapointed that they did not add more from the first game, and the battle system gets repetitive if you overlevel. The review below goes into...
Published on February 7, 2012 by RKOFANT

versus
38 of 43 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Second verse (mostly) same as the First
Second in series from Aksys games, this is actually a prequel to 2010's Agarest War, though no knowledge of the first is needed. That game had a rather troubled existence and bungled release depending on which console you used or were willing to pay for imports. This time we're all on the same page at least, and it's good to see that Aksys pieced everything together...
Published on June 18, 2011 by D. A. Theisen


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

38 of 43 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Second verse (mostly) same as the First, June 18, 2011
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Second in series from Aksys games, this is actually a prequel to 2010's Agarest War, though no knowledge of the first is needed. That game had a rather troubled existence and bungled release depending on which console you used or were willing to pay for imports. This time we're all on the same page at least, and it's good to see that Aksys pieced everything together properly. This 3-star review is from a feeling of being completely underwhelmed, and in no way do I mean to imply that as a fan of things in-genre that I regret my purchase or didn't like it/have fun.

The premise here is, for all intents and purposes, the same as the original-- a rather epic (in length) adventuring campaign with a sizable cast of quirky characters and villains that spans generational gaps. This is achieved via the offspring of the original protagonist, and you get some ability to mold through your actions. Good versus evil, light versus dark, all that good stuff. Character offspring is the "hook" to the Agarest series, where decisions made in dialogue raise and lower virtual affection levels of heroines in a way akin to a stereotypical Japanese dating sim. Awkward for some players, certainly, but there are no 'right' or 'wrong' answers. The story progression is mostly the same regardless (see below), so just enjoy.

The other major selling point on the series, for better or worse, is a rather intricate battlefield system that will certainly cause some head-scratching amongst new players. The basic JRPG phase/turn system is mixed up with action points and varying action combinations. Team tactics play a large roll and using combined skills of all types add extra damage that's an absolute must as things get harder. There are ~150 skill combinations in total and over about a hundred abilities to learn, where every character can use a different set. It requires thought, forces the player to think ahead, and unless in a situation where facing very weak foes at high levels there's no one simple way to complete a fight... so no real slacking off allowed.

The learning curve isn't bad on standard difficulty, but that's partially because of the massively high number of total battles. There's the oft-inept "auto" battle mode, which is supposed to give the player a break on the easier stuff, but it's impossible to properly express the stupidity of the AI and it rarely saves any time and/or effort.

Here stands a large point of contention for me at least-- even though the hope is for combat to never really be entirely the same and for players to use all sorts of fancy attacks, it all feels so, so familiar as you move ahead. Drone-like, in fact. As you'll be fighting hundreds of times against what are essentially the same 20 types of baddie, it can become very draining. The sensation of "can we get on with the story now?" can become overwhelming at times. For players of the first, the combat system is almost completely unchanged and has only a few minor tweaks. Nothing particularly needed a "fix", so in that regard everything still works fine.

A minor reward from all the combat is that story scenes are fairly lengthy, are all fully-voiced (though in Japanese only), the narrative at least somewhat compelling (by video game standards), and characters develop some actual personality. The overhead world view is a rather nostalgic 2D wandering, and the moving character models in 'cutscenes' are still a major throwback to the 16-bit days and I find it rather endearing, even if astonishingly outdated and limited by the studio's production budget.

Another now-heavily recycled piece of the game is the equipment and upgrade/synthesis type. It's tried and true over several games now, and though there's nothing wrong with the user-friendly upgrading system, some kind of innovation or variation would be desperately welcomed. The interface is bland, items are notoriously hard to find materials for, and names of weapons and armor are a near copy-paste from the past.

Add things up and the end result is almost exactly that of the first Agarest with zero fundamental changes, and only a handful of surface adjustments. The sheer length of the game exasperates this all, though it does make the game a pretty good value assuming at least one play of 40+ hours. I'm not per say disappointed, but I may have hoped for more. Zero is by no means a "bad" game for RPG or strategy buffs, but it lacks a spark of something that would help to call it truly "special".

For anyone that enjoyed the first, there's no specific reason why they should stay away from Zero, at least if they know to expect virtually the same game with new scripts and fonts. For new players, it's a strategy challenge and a game where one full run through the storyline could feel rewarding, but split up your sessions. Going back to the "dating" bit from before-- though it's not like you can't finish the game if you choose certain options, just playing on normal mode without much extra thought gives, well, a really lousy ending, and the assumption is that you'll start a NewGame+ on "Extra" (difficult) for the more eventful stuff. This isn't new for JRPGs, but you're left flying blind here most of the time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lot like the first but plenty good, February 7, 2012
By 
RKOFANT (Chicago, IL) - See all my reviews
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
I basically love everything by this developer including any recycled mechanics and the implication that you will need to replay the game to get the true end. I prefer cross edge honestly, but overall this is a solid game. I am dissapointed that they did not add more from the first game, and the battle system gets repetitive if you overlevel. The review below goes into more detail, but it is a solid srpg that focuses on extending attacks by placing party members in certain poximate patterns. If you want, you can subtract a star for admitted fan effect.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Record of Agarest War Zero, June 4, 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
This is a great and very long strategy RPG with turn based combat. The enemies are varied, well, at least their colors look different for the various levels of the same monster, and that is nice. Battles also use different types of enemies, making the battles a little different each time. In combat, the first phase is move and the second is battle. However, characters and monsters will move in the second phase to use their abilities.

POINT SYSTEMS
XP = Experience points needed to level up, fight battles to get them based on the monsters
AP = Action points for movement and skills, character specific and can be enhanced with items
EP = Enhancement points used to upgrade equipment, given from battles based on the monster
TP = Tech points needed to purchase items from the Adventurer's Guild, given from battles based on maximum hit count
PP = Party points may be used to train any character's stats, given mainly from events
S-slots = Special slots on armor and enhancement items, convert other items to get these bonuses, examples STR+12, AGI+17. These do not affect level up.

Learning how best to use Extended Areas is crucial as this allows many characters, up to six, to gang up on an enemy. Also important is getting Overkills in order to get the best drops from the enemies. The Tutorials do well to explain these things but it is up to the player to become proficient with them.

Character development is a big part of the game. I like performing character development. I usually train Vitality for about 10 levels on all characters to increase their Health per level. Using Party Points, PP, helps in this regard. I concentrate on about six characters. Eventually all characters need to be levelled, however.

Creating a character is somewhat confusing. You choose five soul cards with two souls per card and a class (Warrior, Battle Mage, Sorcerer). You also choose your attack types. For those, I always go with Power-Power Light-Extra. The last two skills will not become available until level 45 when characters make a class upgrade.

Some people create a really great 1st Generation character only to find their 2nd Generation character is cruddy. Here are some insights on how this works:

Choosing Soul Cards at the beginning of the game will give the character 10 souls. Class choice adds 15 more souls, and special Event choices during the game will add a few more souls. Then, choice of bride will mix things up and give a 2nd Generation character. However, you get what you get, there area no soul card choices for 2nd Generation (or 3rd). If you choose the following cards you will get a great 1st Generation Battle Mage: 5, 24, 2, 19, 8. This will give the following stats and rankings: STR 16-B, VIT 10-A, AGI 16-B, INT 16-A, LUK 20-A, AP 17, MOV 4, weapon Sword. This will create a great 1st Generation character HOWEVER it will make a HORRIBLE 2nd Generation character!!! That is because this character has too many Dagger, Spear, Knuckle and other junky weapons (unless you like knuckle or dagger) and will also give horrible stats and rankings in STR and VIT no matter who you marry for 2nd Generation.

Instead, go with this: Cards 1, 5, 12, 21, 23, stats and rankings = STR 13-A, VIT 13-A, AGI 13-C, INT 11-C, LUK 13-B, AP 17, MOV 3, weapon Sword, as well as lots of Sword souls. The lower AGI can be overcome just by training. If you marry a certain warrior in 1st Generation, your 2nd Generation character will have S-S in STR-VIT and use Sword! The other stat areas are not too bad, either. Picking up another Gun, Dagger or Spear helps AGI, as well. Having a 4 MOV on the main character is a luxury not often needed. The AP is still 17, and that is nice! Also, equipment upgrades make more of an impact on attack, magic attack, and defense. Characters also get AP from equipment upgrades.

Training your stat areas is important in the long run, but in the short run Item Upgrades are far more useful. A warrior should not be training INT, anyway! As for Sorcerer, I was not able to make a 1st Generation Sorcerer that can use Staff, you get Scythe, instead. However, marrying the Mage girl, as a Sorcerer, will give a Mage for 2nd Generation, either with Staff or even Sword & Staff.

The game dialogue is in Japanese, but there are English translation dialogue boxes to read for the events. Frankly, I did not mind the language, I don't know Japanese, but it was no big deal to me.

Save Before Every Event In Case You Want To Re-choose Your Choices!!!

***** SPOILER Hints: *****
Converting Choziramaru = fiberglass.
During the first Vacation Day, go to the Shop when no one is there to get freebie items.
During the first Vacation Day at Night, go to the Adventurer's Guild when no one is there to get free PP and a 10% TP discount!
***** End Spoilers Hints *****

Record of Agarest War Zero is a lot of fun. The game is at least 80% battles. I really liked this game. Oh, and there are LOTS of Items to be had!!! This is a good game.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, August 8, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Excellent! Thanks.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Good RPG, March 7, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
The Agarest series reminds me of the Growlancer: Heritage of War game.
I like it very much, but less fanservice would do wonders to it... But that's just my opinion as a girl.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I like the strategy RPGs, February 5, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
I like the strategy RPGs, and I bought this one because I wanted a game with almost no story, that I could just slide in my console and battle without wait. I was quite wrong, if you strip your RPG out of any story, it gets boring after some time. I might give it a try again some time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, November 21, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Love it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Utter nonsense on every possible level, December 3, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
I bought this, foolishly thinking it might be a fun little tactical RPG. What I got was a game that LOOKS like a tactical RPG on the surface, but it's really just an exercise in lining up your mans on the glowing squares ("extended areas"). Nothing about any of it makes any actual sense; you're just fiddling around with a bunch of arbitrary positional bonuses that have no relevance to any kind of real tactics or strategy.

Not only that, but the initial character creation is done completely in the dark -- not even the slightest hint what any of it means. Seriously, you might as well just make your choices in your dark. It doesn't matter, though, because the differences are minimal and arbitrary. The game is going to be the same pointless follow-the-highlights tedium regardless of what you pick.

The graphics are weak (PS2 quality), and the special effects -- though they try to be "epic" -- are amateurish and cliched. Note to effects designers: when you try to make every single move look epic, what you end up with is none of it looking very interesting after the first fight.

Also, the story is super slow and boring. And I have a pretty high tolerance for silly stories. I won't even get into the relationship stuff, which to some, I suppose, is the meat of the game. I'd be fine with that if the battle gameplay were even marginally worthwhile, but it's not, so I feel comfortable dismissing the rest of it out of hand.

I hate to be a hater, I really do, but some games are just not good. This is one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What an utter mess, September 4, 2014
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Without a doubt, this is the single worst strategy RPG I've ever played. In general, that might mean that the game was still good (the SRPG has been one of the strongest categories of games, at least in my lifetime), but holy crap - is this bad. For now, let me ignore the creepy fanservice which is present throughout this game. It's such an easy target, but there is so much more to hate about this steaming pile.

Let me begin with the actual "tactical" gameplay. As everyone knows, the SRPG generally sets up turn-based-style tactics, where advantages and disadvantages are conferred on players through the use of terrain, position, and other factors. For example, in Final Fantasy Tactics, a player might gain advantage by positioning his archer on a mountain, in order to gain range with his attacks. Or, she might be put at disadvantage because an enemy attacks her from a flanking position. Even small details like Zodiac signs could play a role in the outcome of a battle. In a game like Suikoden Tactics, relative position of a character and his allies might allow for special unison attacks to be used. Of course, since people move at different times, setting up such an attack might be difficult, because an enemy might move out of the way of a carefully planned attack before all of your characters are in position.

Agarest War Zero plays at these ideas, but misses the point completely. Yes - advantages are granted based on relative position, but there is no rhyme or reason to exactly WHY such position matters. For example, one character might grant bonuses to allies who are situated within a sort-of "wing" formation to his right and left. Another character might grant positional bonuses for characters who are lined up directly beside her. These bonuses are absolutely vital to any success in this game - failure to utilize them appropriately will result in an early rage-quit. But it's completely arbitrary. It's not like a fighter seeks to have archers protecting his flanks, and thus the formation grants bonuses accordingly. It's just a series of lit-up squares. Further, there are no terrain bonuses whatsoever. All terrain is a flat grid.

Movement of characters is the biggest problem. Yes, you can attack an enemy from a flank and receive a bonus. However, each individual character doesn't get his own turn to move. Rather, you determine the movements of ALL characters in your party, completely oblivious to the enemy movements. That is, you will put in the movements for six characters, and only after making the decisions will you see where any enemy goes.

It's hard to describe just how stupid this is, but this is my best effort: imagine you are playing chess. However, instead of alternating movements, each of you have to make...6 movements, all at once, and only afterwards can you see where the pieces fall. It kind of defeats the purpose.

Thus, your movements are pretty simple: you will move your characters within the "good" squares (and hopefully, you were able to pick an appropriate formation and memorized the "good" squares of a character, because the game certainly isn't going to help you with that). Then, you hope that an enemy doesn't use an attack which moves one of your characters, since if he does, your ENTIRE strategy for that round is shot. That's how important those bonuses are. The boggling stupidity of this is incredible to me.

Thankfully (tongue-in-cheek), the game provides you with hundreds of battles to fight. It is absolutely mind-numbing. Further, while winning battles does carry rewards in the form of experience, leveling is actually pretty useless in this game. Most of your attack and defense prowess comes from the equipment you carry, and not your level. That's not to say stats are unimportant. For example, if you aren't getting hit points, you should have pumped vitality. If you can't hit enemies, your luck and agility are lacking. And if you pumped strength without realizing this, well, it sucks to be you! After all, far be it from the developer to explain it to you - you should have bought the guide!

Speaking of equipment, ugh. Most of the stuff you can find/buy is useless. In order to get the good stuff, you'll need to investigate the game's item creation system. If you've ever played Cross Edge, you know what a pain that's going to be. Again, nothing is explained in the least. Good luck figuring it out without a guide. My advice for anyone who is still considering this: download the free gear from PSN. It's much better than pretty much anything you'll stumble over or create in your fumbling manner. If you insist, prepare to grind. Of course you didn't think that materials would be purchase-able? Mostly, you'll need drops from enemies.

And so now, we get to the story. What a slog. There is one redeeming value: the localization is so amateurish that it actually comes off sounding (or, more precisely, reading) hilariously. It feels like an undergrad majoring in Japanese translated this script. Of course, that novelty wears off quickly, but we take our victories where we can. The story itself is standard Japanese dreck. Forces of light and darkness are clashing. You are a chosen one (completely by accident). After a few boring betrayals and a LOT of boring interpersonal relationship, you get to save the world. HOORAY!

The graphics are a joke. Enough said.

And that finally leaves the fanservice, which I won't badmouth. I don't even need to. This game is plenty disastrous. If you think this is good SRPG, you haven't played good SRPG. I would recommend something like Tactics Ogre, or Final Fantasy Tactics, or Vandal Hearts (PS1). Or even lesser titles like Dynasty Tactics and Gladius (PS2).

Heck, if you're one of those creepy people who can't get enough of seeing underage cartoon characters in various states of undress, there are much better titles out there that will satisfy that urge AND keep you entertained in between.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars mom, January 4, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
I bought this for my mom and she loves it. She has a PS3 in her room. She's an avid gamer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Record of Agarest War Zero - Standard Edition - Playstation 3
Used & New from: $12.99
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.