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Record of a Living Being


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DVD
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1-Disc Version
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Product Details

  • Actors: Takashi Shimura
  • Directors: Akira Kurosawa
  • Format: NTSC, Black & White, Full Screen
  • Language: Japanese
  • Subtitles: English, Taiwanese Chinese, Mandarin Chinese
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: MEI AH Laser Disc Co., Ltd.
  • DVD Release Date: August 12, 2003
  • Run Time: 101 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0002JC60G
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #547,339 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By PSPORTOVELOCE on September 29, 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Unique and unforgettable ! Scenes that will literally haunt you with beauty, shock, and raw emotion. Unfortunately, rather contemporary due to its threatening storyline of fear by nuclear attack. Superb ensemble acting with MIFUNE actually believable as an old man despite his relative youth at the time of filming. This was not uncommon among Japanese directors of the period, c.f. OZU Yasujiro's frequent use of the same hair dye-job on RYU Chishu in many of his excellent works. Not a wasted shot with hypnotic direction by Kurosawa.

Trivia: The music score was completed by SATÔ Masaru when composer HAYASAKA Fumio died during production. -----------------------------------------------------------

LIKE "WARUI YATSU..." AKA "THE BAD SLEEP WELL", THIS MEI AH (CHINESE 'TRANSLATED') VERSION OF ONE OF KUROSAWA'S OLDER WORKS SEEMS TO HAVE HAD ITS CHARACTERS' NAMES 'TRANSLITERATED' INTO THEIR CHINESE "ON" READINGS RATHER THAN KEEPING THEIR JAPANESE "KUN" READINGS. ACCORDINGLY, WE NEVER KNOW THEM BY THE NAMES THAT THE OTHER REVIEWERS AND THE OTHER EXTANT REFERENCES TO THE MOVIE MAKE. AFTER A WHILE PERHAPS YOU REALIZE THIS AND THAT THE "CHUNGS" ARE IN ACTUALITY THE 'NAKAJIMAS' IF YOU'VE DONE ANY READING BEFORE HAND AT BEST... OR SIMPLY WONDER WHY EVERYONE IN THE MOVIE HAS A CHINESE NAME AT WORST. BUT MOST DISTURBING OF ALL IS THE NONSENSE SENTENCES THAT RESULT FROM A "TRANSLATION" BY SOMEONE(s) WHO SPEAKS NEITHER THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE (JAPANESE) NOR THE INTENDED OBJECT LANGUAGE (ENGLISH) WELL.

I SUPPOSE IT SHOULD GO WITHOUT SAYING, BUT THE MEI AH VERSIONS OF OLDER KUROSAWA MOVIES SHOULD BE AVOIDED UNLESS ONE HAS A VERY HIGH TOLERANCE FOR CONFUSION AND FRUSTRATION.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Major Kong on March 6, 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This version of Kurosawa's powerful meditation on death, guilt, and the nuclear age is disgraceful. The audio and video quality are poor and the story suffers from the inexplicable "Sinozation" of the characters (I know, that isn't a real word, but I cannot find the right one! By it I mean the characters are given Chinese names, possibly to appeal to the Taiwan market. So, why can't we get a Nipponese version of this uniquely Japanese story?).

There has never been an adequate dramatization of the atomic attacks on Hiroshima. Kiiji Nakazawa's "Barefoot Gen: The Movies 1 & 2" is brilliant, although the live action version is not available in the United States. The animated version is quite good, but still not definitive. Robert Greenwald's Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes is a complete embarrassment.

There have been a few efforts to bring Toyofumi Ogura's Letters from the End of the World: A Firsthand Account of the Bombing of Hiroshima to the screen, which would be much appreciated. But nothing has happened yet.

It took filmmakers nearly 20 years to give a dramatic account of the Holocaust. Sixty-five years after Hiroshima, filmmakers have yet to produce a film worthy of the subject. I wonder why?
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