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The Record of a Quaker Conscience, Cyrus Pringle's Diary - With an Introduction by Rufus M. Jones Paperback – July 12, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 36 pages
  • Publisher: Qontro Classic Books (July 12, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003YL3DVU
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.5 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,745,543 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joe Schenkman on April 17, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Of all the primary-source letters and diaries from the Civil War I’ve read, Cyrus Pringle’s is one of the best. When Pringle, a Vermonter, was drafted, his family paid the computation fee so he wouldn’t have to serve. But Pringle believed he had a “higher duty than that to country,” gave back the $300 fee. On the train through northern Virginia, he witnesses the Dresden-like destruction and knows he stance is justified. Pringle’s challenge of the system included not even working in hospitals as other Quakers did, since he saw this as aiding and prolonging the war. He believed “liberty of conscience is granted us by the Constitution of Vermont as well as that of the United States,” but found those freedoms to be challenged every mile of his journey. At one point, Cyrus was tied spread-eagled on the ground, crucified and forced to a day in the sun to break him. The enlisted men—the foot soldiers—accepted Cyrus and were sympathetic to his view, as well as the hard time he was given by officers. Pringle did not consider it his “job” or “duty” to convert others to his views, or to “preach” them. This powerful and courageous diary was kept in part because Pringle thought it necessary, in case he did not survive the ordeal, as a record. Abraham Lincoln was sympathetic to Quakers, and finally granted Cyrus Pringle a hearing at the White House on October 7, 1861. He was pardoned, and afterwards “seized with delirium.”
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. E. Weeks on June 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am not sure which is better RUFUS JONES introduction or young Pringles reflective personal diary and reflections. When the goal of a war is in agreement with a religious view - in Jones case WW 2 was on his mind, while in Pringles the civil war slavery issue - than the decision not to fight becomes intensely personal demon.

A short classic on the discipline of nonviolence from the rare perspective of youth engaged, rather than the comfort of the armchair of reflective and seasoned age.
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By Texas Tilly on December 18, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book should be standard reading for college students everywhere. Right from the beginning the difference between doing what's right and doing what's wrong is a moral concern. The diary brings us into the life of a Quaker, of course, but it also demonstrates what life is like for those around him. The struggles everyone faced during the Civil War can not be ignored or glamorized after reading this book.
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