Start reading Red Alert (RosettaBooks into Film) on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

Red Alert (RosettaBooks into Film) [Kindle Edition]

Peter Bryant
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: $8.99

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $1.99 (Save 78%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $8.99  
Paperback $13.85  
Mass Market Paperback --  
Unknown Binding --  
Highly Rated Kindle Books
Discover your next great read with these literature & fiction picks and more. Learn more

Book Description

Peter Bryant's 1958 novel Red Alert tells the terrifying tale of just how close to nuclear destruction the world can be. Here, we are faced with the worst possible of all worst-case scenarios in the Cold War; an American general loses his reason and orders a full-scale nuclear attack on the Soviet Union. Air Force Brigadier General Quinten is a dying man suffering from the paranoid delusion that he can make the world a better place by setting in motion this catastrophic attack with Strategic Air Command bombers armed with nuclear weapons.

Once they get wind of it, the President of the United States and his advisors work frantically in all efforts to stop the attack. They order the American bombers shot down, and they succeed - all but with one frightening exception - a lone bomber called the "Alabama Angel" escapes destruction. The crew of the Angel ignore the President's orders and continue on with their deadly mission.

This book was originally published in the U.K. under the title Two Hours to Doom (written by Peter Bryant, the penname of writer Peter George). This intricately plotted and well-thought out novel conjures the vision of apocalyptic threat of nuclear war and illustrates just how absurdly easy such an attack can be triggered.

A virtual genre of such fiction sprang up in the late 1950s, led by Nevil Shute's On the Beach, of which Red Alert was among the earliest and finest examples. Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler's later bestseller, Fail Safe, so closely resembled Red Alert in premise and tone that George sued on plagiarism charges and actually won an out-of-court settlement. Both novels would inspire very different films that were both released in 1964.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Peter Bryant was the pen-name of author Peter George. George's reputation rests largely on his novel Red Alert and the screenplay of the film that it inspired, Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying, which George co-wrote with Stanley Kubrick and Terry Southern. A pessimistic Englishman deeply committed to the campaign for Nuclear Disarmament in the 1950s, George has previously served in the Royal Air Force. He drew on this first-hand knowledge of the new age of nuclear defense and felt compelled to publish under a pseudonym. With the interest in such stories peaking around the time of Stanley Kramer's film version of On the Beach in 1959, the film rights to Red Alert were sold that same year but only to be handed off from producer to producer until Stanley Kubrick bought the rights in 1962, reportedly for as little as $3,500.

In the beginning, George collaborated with Kubrick on writing the film's script; Terry Southern's involvement and satirical overhaul would come later. Apparently, George disliked the ironic tone of Kubrick's film, though he wrote a new novelization of it that he directed to the director.

For the rest of his life, the threat of nuclear catastrophe continued to haunt George. He later wrote about life after nuclear war in a book entitled Commander-I and was at work on a novel entitled Nuclear Survivors when he ultimately committed suicide in 1966.

SERIES DESCRIPTIONS

From classic book to classic film, RosettaBooks has gathered some of most memorable books into film available. The selection is broad ranging and far reaching, with books from classic genre to cult classic to science fiction and horror and a blend of the two creating whole new genres like Richard Matheson's The Shrinking Man. Classic works from Vonnegut, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, meet with E.M. Forster's A Passage to India. Whether the work is centered in the here and now, in the past, or in some distant and almost unimaginable future, each work is lasting and memorable and award-winning.


Product Details

  • File Size: 283 KB
  • Print Length: 166 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 159654581X
  • Publisher: RosettaBooks (January 9, 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003XVYLA8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #122,295 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dr. Strangelove without the dark humor June 23, 2011
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Note: This review was originally published on Red Adept Reviews on June 1, 2011.

Overall: 4 3/4 stars

Plot/Storyline: 5 stars

Okay, let's this out of the way right now. My favorite movie of all time is the dark comedy classic "Dr. Strangelove." Red Alert was the novel that Dr. Strangelove was loosely based upon. Very loosely, I have to add. The essential story was carried over to the film, but the comedy elements were added in the screenplay. In other words, in the novel, there was no Dr. Strangelove, there was no breaking-into-the-Coke-machine scene, and Slim Pickens didn't ride the bomb down.

But don't be too upset. Aside from the comedy stuff, the storyline of Red Alert was carried over to the movie fairly accurately. As a fan of the movie, I even recognized much of the dialogue.

Instead of the psycho General Jack Ripper, there was General Quinten, commanding officer of the 843rd Bomb wing based at Sonora AFB, who decided to take out the Soviet Union with a massive first strike against their airfields and ICBM launch complexes. He issued "Wing Attack - Plan R" orders to his B-52s, and as in the movie, only he knew the recall code prefix ("OPE") that would bring back the planes. Inside the Pentagon's War Room, the President and his military and civilian staff argued the merits of sending in every SAC bomber to finish the job the 843rd had started. And on the B-52 "Alabama Angel," commanded by Captain Clint Brown, the crew went about their deadly business of delivering two hydrogen bombs.

And the Soviets did have a Doomsday Device that would destroy the world if it was triggered.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic May 15, 2011
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I don't know how it is I never got around to reading this before. It's a classic novel and part of the foundation for the entire genre of Apocalyptic novels. This a cautionary tale of how failsafes can be breached and the system itself can be used against itself to spiral out of control.

It reads like any novel written in the 50's complete with main characters who are all white men and fine upstanding examples of duty and valor. But, that doesn't detract from the overall story, it actually makes the story more believable since the everyone is doing their duty to the best of their abilities. Its fast paced and relatively short - only 2600+ locations - and makes for a pleasant read. Unlike most modern novels in the genre, there is no gore, no panic in the general population and a comparably small body count.

If you're a fan of Apocalyptic fiction, this is a must read.
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Study of Fear and Paranoia November 19, 2008
Format:Paperback
Before you start to read this book it might be a good idea (especially if you are under thirty years old) to do a little reading about 1958 in an almanac or encyclopedia supplement for that year. For those of us who as elementary school students, were taught to turn our desks to the window and cower behind it, or hide in the halls; this could have been a true story. There were more than one or two scares in those days that could have led to a "Nuclear Exchange".

Of little note today is that SAC (the Strategic Air Command) had air fleets of B-52s armed and in the air from the 1950s until the early 1990s. During that time there were many 'incidents' that could have triggered a 'bombing' should there not have been numerous "failsafes" that kept this from happening. One of the major protections was the 'red phone' lines directly between the US President and the General Secretary of the USSR.

While Kubrick decided to turn this into a satire, most of what happens in the book does happen in the movie, without the comedy. What prevented this disaster from actually happening was that 'Plan R' was NEVER a scenario that was approved for use by the Joint Chiefs. One of the reasons that no one person (except for the President) could order a strike was to prevent some one going off the deep end and ordering a nuclear strike. In most cases it took two or more people to arm a missile and fire it. The 'Minuteman' sites were set-up so that one person couldn't turn both keys at once and the two men in the silo were armed so as to able to shoot each other should it become necessary to stop any attempted launch.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
22 of 29 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars You Can't Fight in Here! This is the War Room! May 29, 2010
Format:Paperback
"Nucular combat toe to toe with the Russkies". Red Alert is the book that Dr. Strangelove was based on. The only thing is that the book is not a comedy, not even a black comedy. Red Alert is a book written in the 1950s in the Cold War period about the US/Soviet stand-off. This book is played for real.

It's not a great book, but a good flashback to the mood of the Cold War. It's interesting that Stanley Kubrick took this book as his starting point. He exaggerated the themes of the book to construct his black comedy. It didn't take much. The logic of General Quinten (General Ripper in the movie) is something deeply rooted in the Cold War. A first strike made sense, within the logic of a death match between the US and the Soviet Union. And the movie, and the book, follow that logic to its conclusion. Not good.

There's no "Dr. Strangelove" in the book. He is a brilliant invention of Kubrick. The disturbing thing is that, without Strangelove, and without the exaggerations, the logic proceeds to its disastrous conclusion.

"Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!"
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read
Great read scary to think it could happen, hopefully additional precautions are in place.
Keeps you on the edge of your seat.
Published 4 days ago by mecrazysteve
5.0 out of 5 stars great read
As a fan of the Dr Strangelove film, really enjoyed this book. It's a quick read but really delves into the intricacies about how the system works and how it can all go awry.
Published 3 months ago by ds
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Story, Poor Editing
Not having lived during the height of the Cold War, it interests me to read about it as much as possible. Read more
Published 4 months ago by John Mishoe
5.0 out of 5 stars All Americans Need to Read This Book
Gripping 1960s story - this is not Dr. Strangelove - it's the story on which Dr. Strangelove was based. There's no comic relief in Red Alert. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Bennett E. Werner
5.0 out of 5 stars Take the time to read this book
As they say, even better than the movie (and I loved the movie). Characters are fascinating and the action is all over the place. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Mark Nicholas
5.0 out of 5 stars Serious version of Dr. Strangelove
It is amazing how closely Dr. Strangelove followed this Book -- except that Peter Sellers and others added so much humor that this one is awfully serious by comparison. Read more
Published 6 months ago by Lloyd SoCal
5.0 out of 5 stars Much Darker Than the Movie
I love the movie Dr Strangelove with its dark humor. The book has the darkness but little of the humor. Read more
Published 6 months ago by SifuJon
4.0 out of 5 stars fun read
Takes me back to a time of nuclear paranoia that I had almost forgotten. I recommend it for nostalgic baby-boomers and any explorers of that strange post-war culture.
Published 6 months ago by Rev. Judith Kelsey-Powell
5.0 out of 5 stars Great vintage sci-fi
Simply a vintage sci-if read that no one should miss. The movie's almost as good as the book (rare), but the book still wins out. Read more
Published 6 months ago by Colorado
4.0 out of 5 stars A Five Star Story with 1 Star Editing
Red Alert is an excellent story that became the basis for the satirical film, Dr. Strangelove. Red Alert is a very serious book, discussing the dangers that arise from living with... Read more
Published 7 months ago by Joel Crowden
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category


ARRAY(0xa4d74bdc)