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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is amazing portrait of a Sioux woman, Zikala-Sa, recreated through her own stories ...
The Quaker missionaries had come to the Yankton Sioux reservation in South Dakota where little Gertrude Simmons and her family made their home. When Gertrude, later known as Red Bird or Zitkala-Sa, was a young child she played freely with her friends and celebrated their Indian heritage in games. It wasn't until the decision was made that she would ride the iron horse...
Published on October 10, 2011 by D. Fowler

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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Amazing
I choose this book for a school reading assignment it turned out to be a great great great book get this book
Published 13 months ago by GRACE 0101


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is amazing portrait of a Sioux woman, Zikala-Sa, recreated through her own stories ..., October 10, 2011
This review is from: Red Bird Sings: The Story of Zitkala-Sa, Native American Author, Musician, and Activist (Hardcover)
The Quaker missionaries had come to the Yankton Sioux reservation in South Dakota where little Gertrude Simmons and her family made their home. When Gertrude, later known as Red Bird or Zitkala-Sa, was a young child she played freely with her friends and celebrated their Indian heritage in games. It wasn't until the decision was made that she would ride the iron horse like her older brother, Dawée, had a few years before, that things would change forever. She too would receive an education, but when she "looked back and watched the lonely figure of [her] mother vanish in the distance," the young eight-year-old began to have reservations. It was 1884 and when little Gertrude rode the train headed to White's Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, people stared and pointed at them.

Her new found friend Judéwin mentioned that they were planning to cut their hair, in preparation for this new boarding school. Gertrude was strong-willed and claimed, "No, I will not submit! I will struggle first!" Her struggles would prove to be futile as strong ropes held her fast to a chair. A lone tear made its way down her cheek as she beheld a hand holding one of her precious braids. It was then that her spirit flew, a spirit that would not return to her heart for many years until she was known as Zikala-Sa. The Anglos soon set them to work learning and keeping to a strict schedule. The "girls were shown how to be housekeepers" and the "boys were trained to be farmers." The little lost Sioux child was learning many things, but when would her spirit return to her? Would she be able to hold onto her heritage or would it fall to the wayside like a string of broken promises?

This is amazing portrait of a Sioux woman, Zikala-Sa, recreated through her own stories. When Zikala-Sa, Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was an adult she became a well-known writer, musician, and an activist, dedicating her "life to the Native American cause." The short stories and vignettes in this book were pieced together so well the reader will instantaneously get a feel for Zikala-Sa's inimitable personality and zest for any cause she adopted. Although time can sometimes erase the memories we have of famous people of their time, the book revives them perfectly. It puts that one piece of the puzzle back into place so we can understand Native American culture as she saw it. The artwork meshes perfectly with the tale and brings out the emotional nuances of Zikala-Sa's struggles with every brush stroke. In the back of the book are two photographs of Zikala-Sa, a brief biographical sketch, a selected bibliography, references to some of her writing, and additional recommended book and website resources to explore. This is an excellent, heartwarming biography you may wish to add to your shelves!

This book courtesy of the publisher.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A powerful tale, December 19, 2011
In this paraphrase of original texts by Red Bird, author Gina Capaldi retells the stories of this Native American girl who grew up between the world of her native people and the white people.

A powerful story. I especially loved how the author used the words of Red Bird to tell the story of her difficult life. I got the sense that this was a fascinating person, full of the wonderful contradictions that intrigue us about others.

"It was night when we reached the school grounds and were led toward an open door. The noisy hurrying of hard shoes upon a bare wooden floor whirring in my ears frightened me, and I began to cry. The Angos could not understand the cause of my tears and placed me at a table loaded with food. Because of my sobs, I could swallow very little that evening. I was tucked into bed with one of the tall girls. She talked to me in my mother's tongue and soothed me. Many events would follow, which would force me to be brave in a cold, unknown world."
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Red Bird Sings - THe Story of Zitkala-Sa, August 20, 2013
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This review is from: Red Bird Sings: The Story of Zitkala-Sa, Native American Author, Musician, and Activist (Hardcover)
This book is just as wonderful as Gipaldi's other Indian biography A Boy Named Beckoning. Both tell the stories of the Indian children in ways that children can relate to and understand. In both books, the artwork is splendid. These two books are great to use in the classroom.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars She still sings!, December 16, 2013
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This review is from: Red Bird Sings: The Story of Zitkala-Sa, Native American Author, Musician, and Activist (Hardcover)
It's amazing how much of our history we never encounter until someone takes time to put it together in such a presentable fashion.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Red Bird Sings is an inspiring book for young readers., November 15, 2012
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This review is from: Red Bird Sings: The Story of Zitkala-Sa, Native American Author, Musician, and Activist (Hardcover)
Because Red Bird Sings: The Story of Zitkala-Sa, Native American Author".uses autobiographical material published early in the 20th Century, sometimes the language is somewhat stilted; however, Red Bird's life tells of a remarkable woman who used her talents and life to lift up not only her own people, but to stand for equal rights for all. Guided by a teacher or parent the story can be used for discussion.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, January 15, 2014
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I choose this book for a school reading assignment it turned out to be a great great great book get this book
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Red Bird Sings: The Story of Zitkala-Sa, Native American Author, Musician, and Activist
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